Author Topic: The Problem of Information  (Read 375 times)

Offline SGOS

Re: The Problem of Information
« Reply #30 on: April 27, 2021, 04:34:22 PM »
I don't think about it.  It's a fiction, so why dwell upon it?  It simply does not enter into my mind.
The problem for me is that there just too many wonderful real things to learn about.  And I can't even do all of them.

Re: The Problem of Information
« Reply #31 on: April 27, 2021, 06:05:53 PM »
The problem for me is that there just too many wonderful real things to learn about.  And I can't even do all of them.
Hear you on that one!
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Offline Hydra009

Re: The Problem of Information
« Reply #32 on: April 27, 2021, 07:39:02 PM »
You will often hear that our genes are a blueprint or a software algorithm for life, especially if someone wants to argue an intelligent god has created us. Yet DNA is not at all like software code or a set of blueprints. Nobody is reading the blueprint and nothing like a computer chip is executing 'code'. There is no centralized set of instructions that controls the development and maintenance of the human body.
IIRC, Richard Dawkins explains DNA as more like a recipe than a blueprint.  And of course, that's just an analogy, so that's not completely accurate, either.

Re: The Problem of Information
« Reply #33 on: April 28, 2021, 03:06:17 AM »
I don't think about it.  It's a fiction, so why dwell upon it?  It simply does not enter into my mind.

So, works of fiction do not deserve study? Do you know that there is an entire field called ''Tolkien research'', for example?

Re: The Problem of Information
« Reply #34 on: April 28, 2021, 09:13:16 AM »
So, works of fiction do not deserve study? Do you know that there is an entire field called ''Tolkien research'', for example?
Did not say fiction did not deserve study.  Unless I have a specific reason to study religious fiction (as all of it is), I don't.  My personal 'hobby' is the study of the fiction of Jesus.  But other than that, I don't feel the desire to look into that type of fiction.  I am not aware of 'Tolkien research' nor am I much interested.  That does not mean you can't be interested.  Joseph Campbell made a career studying the fiction of myth and the purpose it serves in our societies.  At one time, I was very interested. 

I guess my actual point is that you pull some obscure topic off the shelf, as if we are aware of it and what is our opinion.  And you don't give us your opinion.  They way you word these questions of yours feels like you are trying to set some kind of 'trap' for us.  I find that annoying.
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?