Author Topic: The feeling of belonging to nowhere  (Read 196 times)

The feeling of belonging to nowhere
« on: May 11, 2021, 03:43:04 PM »
I am an outsider in this world.
I am always a foreigner.
Some times like this it strikes stronger.

Cannot say here or there, is my country.
Because of my parents' job, I spent my childhood years 4 different cities and havent got any connection with the friends from them. And it has been so until now, the university I went was in another city, the job I am working is in another.


I am not a religious man and cant feel closer any of them.

I dont support any political party or ideology...

I am not even a fan of a football team.

It is hard, man...


Re: The feeling of belonging to nowhere
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2021, 03:48:14 PM »
I am an outsider in this world.
I am always a foreigner.
Some times like this it strikes stronger.

Cannot say here or there, is my country.
Because of my parents' job, I spent my childhood years 4 different cities and havent got any connection with the friends from them. And it has been so until now, the university I went was in another city, the job I am working is in another.


I am not a religious man and cant feel closer any of them.

I dont support any political party or ideology...

I am not even a fan of a football team.

It is hard, man...
“Follow your bliss.
If you do follow your bliss,
you put yourself on a kind of track
that has been there all the while waiting for you,
and the life you ought to be living
is the one you are living.
When you can see that,
you begin to meet people
who are in the field of your bliss,
and they open the doors to you.
I say, follow your bliss and don't be afraid,
and doors will open
where you didn't know they were going to be.
If you follow your bliss,
doors will open for you that wouldn't have opened for anyone else.”

― Joseph Campbell

Easy to say, easy to read, hard to do--but worth the effort.
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Re: The feeling of belonging to nowhere
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2021, 03:54:20 PM »
Follow your bliss.  My motto.  For me, it is what makes me feel good.  Not what I think should make me feel good; not what society says is worthy enough to make one feel good--but what actually makes me feel good.  Find it and do it.  I love playing games (video games) that I like--I don't care if people say it is frivolous of kid stuff.  I like it!
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Re: The feeling of belonging to nowhere
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2021, 04:01:09 PM »
“Follow your bliss.
If you do follow your bliss,
you put yourself on a kind of track
that has been there all the while waiting for you,
and the life you ought to be living
is the one you are living.
When you can see that,
you begin to meet people
who are in the field of your bliss,
and they open the doors to you.
I say, follow your bliss and don't be afraid,
and doors will open
where you didn't know they were going to be.
If you follow your bliss,
doors will open for you that wouldn't have opened for anyone else.”

― Joseph Campbell

Easy to say, easy to read, hard to do--but worth the effort.

Thanks Mike,
that is full of wisdom.

There is a saying that: I am translating,
one understands how he actually should have lived his life, in his lifetime closer to death.

I wish regretlessness...

Re: The feeling of belonging to nowhere
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2021, 05:07:04 PM »
Thanks Mike,
that is full of wisdom.

There is a saying that: I am translating,
one understands how he actually should have lived his life, in his lifetime closer to death.

I wish regretlessness...
You are welcome.  I find solace in two philosophical places.  One of Joseph Campbell--'follow your bliss' and 'the purpose of life is life!'.  Two little phrases that seem almost frivolous at first glance.  Yet, there are depths of meaning there.  I guess, the bottom line is to know yourself.  Don't judge, just know.  If you like something, do you really like it or do you like it because you are supposed to?  The real job is finding out.  And don't lie to yourself.  Find out what you really like--then do it.

Gibran is another source, especially The Prophet.  Read it if you have not.  Good luck in your search. 
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Online Mr.Obvious

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Re: The feeling of belonging to nowhere
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2021, 06:56:12 PM »
Thanks Mike,
that is full of wisdom.

There is a saying that: I am translating,
one understands how he actually should have lived his life, in his lifetime closer to death.

I wish regretlessness...

I don't. Regret is the inevitable byproduct of making any choice. For before you make it, you have nigh unlimited pathways to choose from. And even if you choose the best one, you'll never experience all the other routes you could' ve taken.

The only people who truly live without regret are those that never choose. A man chooses, a slave obeys.

Live and conquer. Regret and cherish as you carve your own path.

Best of luck, soldier.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2021, 06:59:48 PM by Mr.Obvious »
"If we have to go down, we go down together!"
- Your mum, requesting 69 last night.

Atheist Mantis does not pray.

Re: The feeling of belonging to nowhere
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2021, 09:05:57 PM »
I don't. Regret is the inevitable byproduct of making any choice. For before you make it, you have nigh unlimited pathways to choose from. And even if you choose the best one, you'll never experience all the other routes you could' ve taken.

The only people who truly live without regret are those that never choose. A man chooses, a slave obeys.

Live and conquer. Regret and cherish as you carve your own path.

Best of luck, soldier.
Very well put.  And I quite agree. 

An example.  My first marriage was a mistake; a huge one on some levels.  Yet, it lasted 22 years and gave me two things; a vast schooling in what I did not want in a mate and a daughter.  I don't regret those 22 years.  I lived and I learned and my daughter has turned out to be a huge blessing.  There are a huge number of choices I could have made but did not.  I like to think that I have made the best (or at least sound ones) choices with the data I had at the time.  I could go back and rehash many of them and regret those that I have understood as mistakes.  But one cannot do that, so I strive to move on and not beat myself up for making the choices that I did.
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?