Author Topic: Conspiracy theories  (Read 1649 times)

Re: Conspiracy theories
« Reply #75 on: February 23, 2021, 03:54:44 PM »
Secondly, there’s the fact that Bill Gates has actually floated the idea of using weather control to battle climate change. The idea is to spray calcium carbonate into the atmosphere so that it can reflect some of the sun’s rays back and hopefully cool down the Earth, as Forbes explains. ...

I heard about that. It delays global warming, but it also turns the atmosphere into a ticking timebomb, if we don't take action to actually reduce carbon emissions. Rather than see the effects gradually over many years, it would hit us all at once like an apocalypse.
"Oh, wearisome condition of humanity,
Born under one law, to another bound;
Vainly begot, and yet forbidden vanity,
Created sick, commanded to be sound."
--Fulke Greville

Online Hydra009

Re: Conspiracy theories
« Reply #76 on: February 23, 2021, 04:21:30 PM »
Snow is apparently a lot cheaper to make than ski resorts let on.  Also, you have to wonder at what anyone could gain by an unusually large snowstorm.  Aside from the power companies charging Texans ludicrous bills, not a whole lot of people are benefiting.

This seems like yet another example of a systemic failure covered up by conspiracy theory.  Can't find someone to blame, so blame Canada Bill Gates.

Re: Conspiracy theories
« Reply #77 on: February 27, 2021, 01:24:33 AM »
That is interesting.  I like to think that I have not developed or believed in any conspiracy theory.  But I've always been skeptical of most things, until I've had a chance to figure something out for myself.  But I have a close friend who believes JFK was killed because LBJ wanted him dead.  We have talked about this at some length (I have tried not to attack him but tried to figure out what he thinks is proof) and he still persists that LBJ had it done. 

So, you believed in a conspiracy(s) theory.  What caused you to not believe it anymore?

I did analyzed what say the debunkers and I did concluded what say debunkers is more sensical that what say conspiracy theories.
When I deconvert from Christianity to became an Atheist I understood than my beliefs about my destiny were false

1.Between my 4 years old until my deconversion at age of 19 or 20 I always had the feeling that I will take part to the last battle (Armageddon not the film but the place).

2.Between my 4 years old until my deconversion at age of 19 or 20 I had often this weird sensation in my Thorax , a sensation to be like a empty memory card that was a physical sensation of my faith.

3.Between my 4 years old until my deconversion at age of 19 or 20 I always had the feeling that I will have the chance to see the second coming of Christ.

4.Conspiracy theories make me believe I was on the good side and reinforced my belief in religion.

5.When I began to deconvert from Christianity. I began to understand my beliefs in conspiracy theories weren't true.

Offline aitm

Re: Conspiracy theories
« Reply #78 on: February 27, 2021, 08:09:21 AM »
My wife’s aunt sent her a notice straight from Quacker-non...this one was from mid Jan. They claimed there were some 375,000 Chinese troops “surrounding us...75,000 in Canada and the rest in Mexico....but DONT WORRY Trumps general are ready to wipe them out...

Keepers, you’d think some folks in Canada would notice 75,000 chinks....

Supposedly the space force has been in existence for years only under a old name. Now it is up and running and they have already shot down a dozen Chinese missies off the coast of Florida...but DONT WORRY...Trumps general are all over it...you won’t even hear about it.

LOL...jesus fucking christ...these followers are some really really stupid people...and THAT makes them dangerous.
A humans desire to live is exceeded only by their willingness to die for another. Even god cannot equal this magnificent sacrifice. No god has the right to judge them.-first tenant of the Panotheust

Offline drunkenshoe

Re: Conspiracy theories
« Reply #79 on: February 27, 2021, 11:18:53 AM »
Snowfake videos! AHAHAAH I'm sure sombody thought of that before. 

E: posted to the wrong thread before...
« Last Edit: February 27, 2021, 11:47:45 AM by drunkenshoe »
"I believe you find life such a problem because you think there are good people and bad people. You're wrong, of course. There are, always and only, the bad people, but some of them are on opposite sides." Havelock Vetinari

Re: Conspiracy theories
« Reply #80 on: March 18, 2021, 10:34:09 AM »
Interesting article on conspiracy theories and the strategy of engaging people's doubts rather than challenging their beliefs.

What Conspiracy Theorists Don’t Believe - Distinguishing excessive doubt from excessive belief can help inform how to bring a conspiracy theorist back to reality.

... Is the line between excessive doubt and excessive belief a distinction without a difference? I don’t think so, because it helps inform how to bring a conspiracy theorist back to reality. One must recognize that this is a person who already mistrusts what most authoritative sources say. One should ask calm questions, inviting the conspiracy theorist to explain and reflect on his beliefs, rather than advance evidence or quote the experts. The evidence and the experts, remember, are exactly what the conspiracy theorist has already rejected.

When someone has dismissed the obvious facts, repeating them will not persuade him to see sense. But when people are given time and space to explain themselves, they may start to spot the gaps in their own knowledge or arguments. The psychologists Leonid Rozenblit and Frank Keil coined the phrase “the illusion of explanatory depth” to refer to the way our self-assurance crumples when we are invited to explain apparently simple ideas.

A focus on excessive credulity distracts from the problem of excessive doubt, which is everywhere in our modern information ecosystem. We are all capable of motivated reasoning, of believing what we want to believe. But we are all also capable of doubting what we want to doubt, and studies have found that motivated reasoning has a special power when it takes the form of doubt. ...

Propagandists have long understood this quirk of human psychology. In the 1950s, when Big Tobacco faced growing evidence that cigarettes were deadly, the industry turned doubt into a weapon. Realizing that smokers dearly wished to believe that their habit wasn’t killing them, Big Tobacco concluded that the best approach was not to try to prove that cigarettes were safe. Instead, it would merely raise doubts about the emerging evidence that they were dangerous. The famous “Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers” from 1954 managed to look socially responsible while simultaneously reassuring smokers that “research scientists have publicly questioned” the significance of the new findings. ...

« Last Edit: March 18, 2021, 11:06:18 AM by GSOgymrat »
"Religions are like fireflies. They require darkness in order to shine." - Arthur Schopenhauer

Offline drunkenshoe

Re: Conspiracy theories
« Reply #81 on: March 18, 2021, 11:22:03 AM »
OK. But these people do not make researches or readings about what experts say on some subject and decide according to that. They are opinions and ideas are not really built. They only listen what few people in their circle says, whoever in the most powerful position and repeat that to each other and others to have a standing, to be accepted in that group. Religious, nationalist groups are closed groups with strong hierarchies by thier nature and definition. They are not tolerant, diverse groups.

If you join one of these groups and ask them to explain their beliefs, nobody would try to explain something but hand you some source telling what it is the truth and that it is the truth. Chances are high that you won't have conversations and probably won't last long if you insist and at some point, you'll be told to leave. You would even be in danger of some sort. 

If you join some tolerant, diverse, democratic group in general and try to argue about conspiracy theories, people would argue back with different ways, styles, sources, books and at most laugh at you some point, if you insist on it.

Also, I've missed this one somehow: "...airplane GPS is rigged to fool pilots into thinking otherwise. ..." LOL
"I believe you find life such a problem because you think there are good people and bad people. You're wrong, of course. There are, always and only, the bad people, but some of them are on opposite sides." Havelock Vetinari

Online Hydra009

Re: Conspiracy theories
« Reply #82 on: March 18, 2021, 03:00:20 PM »
Quckoos find special significance in the White House having a green light on St. Patrick's Day

Two possibilities:
1) celebrating St. Patrick's Day (pretty straightforward and obvious)
2) a secret signal to a band of nutjobs to *do something* cause green street lights mean go
« Last Edit: March 18, 2021, 03:32:20 PM by Hydra009 »