Atheistforums.com

Humanities Section => History General Discussion => Topic started by: Cassia on March 18, 2021, 10:44:11 PM

Title: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 18, 2021, 10:44:11 PM
Could be fun and instructive even to have a history quiz.. Here's one for ya
Who is this hot guy and what happened to him?
(https://preview.redd.it/za32jk24ian61.jpg?width=640&crop=smart&auto=webp&s=ef4d6168485cfac0710454239850304b6276c3d5)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Hydra009 on March 18, 2021, 10:45:52 PM
Lincoln assassination co-conspirator Lewis Payne.  Hanged to death.

Clarification: his target was US Secretary of State William Henry Seward, whom he wounded but didn't kill.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 18, 2021, 10:48:19 PM
Lincoln assassination co-conspirator Lewis Payne.  Hanged to death.
Wow..impressed. Yes !!!
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SoldierofFortune on March 19, 2021, 12:11:36 AM
I am in no way an expert on the English language, but I have an observation that there is a transition in English into gender-neutrality in the use of adjectives. But still there is no consensus in the English-speaking world about the standardized form.

In the historical English when you say men, you mean all the people in the world including men, women and even gays... and when you say mankind, you mean humankind or humanity...

and for about 3-4 decades there has been a trend to avoid using his or her, but using their is the pronoun of preference even if you indicate a singular person.

now quiz, who is the name of the feminist person who claimed that the word " history " is actually the phrase "his story", to prove that the society is actually patriarchal? Because even the history of mankind is the history of man! can you believe that, it's his story, bro!? :)))))







Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Hydra009 on March 19, 2021, 01:34:27 AM
I am in no way an expert on the English language, but I have an observation that there is a transition in English into gender-neutrality in the use of adjectives. But still there is no consensus in the English-speaking world about the standardized form.

In the historical English when you say men, you mean all the people in the world including men, women and even gays... and when you say mankind, you mean humankind or humanity...
??  To the best of my knowledge, gay men are still considered men.

And english is only partially gender-neutral.  Policeman/postman are being phased out, but there are a bunch of gendered words that aren't going anywhere:  actor/actress, waiter/waitress, host/hostess, tiger/tigress, hero/heroine, and blond/blonde.  Ships are female (and handsome) and all dogs are, without exception, good boys.  Just the other day, I was reading about a female comedienne and practically did a double-take because I didn't even know there was a gendered version of the word comedian.

Personally, I try to avoid gendered words when possible for simplicity and convenience.  Everyone's a hero (in their own way), actor, comedian, etc.  Because I find the idea of having to look up their gender every time I refer to someone exhausting.  It's like french counting or imperial units of measurement - there's no real reason to do it and you're just making more work for yourself.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 19, 2021, 04:52:58 AM
What the heck is this and who the heck is that..?
(https://i.ibb.co/bNffZhJ/5b3117da5e48ec4b008b458e.jpg)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: PopeyesPappy on March 19, 2021, 07:34:46 AM
The first US Treasury Note. Secretary of the Treasury Salmon Chase.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 19, 2021, 07:51:19 AM
The first US Treasury Note. Secretary of the Treasury Salmon Chase.
A "George-less" dollar. Imagine that. A worker would be doing well to get two per day for their wages in the 1790s.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on March 19, 2021, 12:15:52 PM
Who was this, and what was his mission?

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48239105411_21ee481c70_c.jpg)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on March 19, 2021, 12:37:05 PM
SGOS--are you MAD????  One of my all time favs.  Mad magazine was a staple growing up.  And Alfred E. Neuman was THE best nerd of all time!  If I remember right, Sick Magazine came out soon after I discovered MAD.  That was followed by one later called Cracked.  Loved all three.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 19, 2021, 02:04:38 PM
SGOS--are you MAD????  One of my all time favs.  Mad magazine was a staple growing up.  And Alfred E. Neuman was THE best nerd of all time!  If I remember right, Sick Magazine came out soon after I discovered MAD.  That was followed by one later called Cracked.  Loved all three.
I always got MAD confused with National Lampoon. My brother used to have them around with some Playboys in the middle of the stack. Geez we used to get 'Life' and National Geographic delivered. So cool.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: PickelledEggs on March 19, 2021, 04:42:59 PM
I am in no way an expert on the English language, but I have an observation that there is a transition in English into gender-neutrality in the use of adjectives. But still there is no consensus in the English-speaking world about the standardized form.

In the historical English when you say men, you mean all the people in the world including men, women and even gays... and when you say mankind, you mean humankind or humanity...

and for about 3-4 decades there has been a trend to avoid using his or her, but using their is the pronoun of preference even if you indicate a singular person.

now quiz, who is the name of the feminist person who claimed that the word " history " is actually the phrase "his story", to prove that the society is actually patriarchal? Because even the history of mankind is the history of man! can you believe that, it's his story, bro!? :)))))








Next time you post something so off-the-wall, please put it in the "random internet dafuq" thread lol
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on March 19, 2021, 06:24:18 PM
I always got MAD confused with National Lampoon. My brother used to have them around with some Playboys in the middle of the stack. Geez we used to get 'Life' and National Geographic delivered. So cool.
Somehow I missed National Lampoon.  Don't think I have even seen a copy of one.  I do remember my grandpa and great uncle (lived on the same farm) having Popular Mechanics and Popular Science around.  And my grandpa subscribed to Fate and Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Mag.  Fun reading!

Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on March 19, 2021, 06:44:31 PM
I was visiting my cousin in Texas one time, and seeing the sites we ended up one time in a nostalgia shop, which is not quite an antique store, but on the counter there was a stack of very old Mad Magazines.  I think they were being sold for a reasonable price of $1 each <collectors copies?>  I was overcome by a wash of old memories, but I'm not an impulse buyer, so regrettably, I didn't buy them.  I wish I would have bought the whole stack, even if it turned out that I no longer thought Mad Magazine was the end all be all of literary publications.  It would be nice to just have them around.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on March 19, 2021, 08:12:53 PM
Gonna have to dig out my old Sick--dates from the 60's I think and has a picture story featuring Tom Poston (remember him???).  I found Sick to be almost as good as MAD.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on March 19, 2021, 11:29:14 PM
I remember Tom Poston, but haven't thought about him for years.  I can't imagine Sick doing a story on him.  Was it satire?  I didn't follow Sick or Cracked.  If one was laying around, I would read it of course, but I was loyal to Mad.  It was a almost a devotion.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on March 20, 2021, 12:16:34 AM
I remember Tom Poston, but haven't thought about him for years.  I can't imagine Sick doing a story on him.  Was it satire?  I didn't follow Sick or Cracked.  If one was laying around, I would read it of course, but I was loyal to Mad.  It was a almost a devotion.
I have that issue around here somewhere--have to dig it out.  Yeah, it is a satire publication, but a bit darker than MAD, I think.  It was not a story about Poston, but I don't remember what it was about.  MAD was cartoons.  Sick was with pictures of actual people.  I agree, MAD was/is the gold standard.  Sick and Cracked were clearly trailing behind--but funny in their own ways.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 20, 2021, 08:46:03 AM
Somebody is apologizing. Why? (love the hats)
(https://i.ibb.co/1QZxVKR/Ph6x6p94uzn61.jpg)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on March 20, 2021, 08:54:53 AM
Orson Wells, for scaring the shit out of everyone.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on March 20, 2021, 08:55:10 AM
Orson Welles, had a radio show in the late 30's.  The War Of The World was broadcast and many thought it was for real.  The Martians were here!!  He is talking about the show and its effects it had.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on March 20, 2021, 09:00:28 AM
And I grew up with those hats.  I never had one, because they were for adults.  When I got to be that age, the hats were out, and long hair was in.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 20, 2021, 10:39:01 AM
And I grew up with those hats.  I never had one, because they were for adults.  When I got to be that age, the hats were out, and long hair was in.
When you look back at historical film and photos of people out-and-about I am often struck by how "well dressed" they are. The shift towards casual attire seems to have started in the 1960s. I guess we can view dressing up as just a superficial act, however when I do dress-up, perhaps I behave with just a bit more care, maybe subconsciously. I am sometimes accused for "overdressing", LOL. If you dress like a slob, do you act the part, I wonder?
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on March 20, 2021, 11:57:14 AM
When you look back at historical film and photos of people out-and-about I am often struck by how "well dressed" they are. The shift towards casual attire seems to have started in the 1960s. I guess we can view dressing up as just a superficial act, however when I do dress-up, perhaps I behave with just a bit more care, maybe subconsciously. I am sometimes accused for "overdressing", LOL. If you dress like a slob, do you act the part, I wonder?
I wonder that, too.  It has been shown in studies, that if one is in a bad mood and do forced smiles, that after awhile your mood will improve to the point where you want to smile.  Is dressing up sort of like that?  If you dress well, do you feel better about yourself?  Off the top of my head, my guess would be that it does.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on March 20, 2021, 12:48:06 PM
Orson Welles, had a radio show in the late 30's.  The War Of The World was broadcast and many thought it was for real.  The Martians were here!!  He is talking about the show and its effects it had.
Every commercial break included a statement that this was a dramatization of H.G. Wells' "War of the Worlds." The UFO nuts didn't care about that awkward taint of reality.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on March 20, 2021, 12:49:52 PM
I wonder that, too.  It has been shown in studies, that if one is in a bad mood and do forced smiles, that after awhile your mood will improve to the point where you want to smile.  Is dressing up sort of like that?  If you dress well, do you feel better about yourself?  Off the top of my head, my guess would be that it does.
If you look at photographs from the era you see men dressed in suits doing jobs that would call for t-shirts and blue jeans today. Getting caught "just in his vest" meant he took his jacket off to do something. So glad I missed that era.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: aitm on March 20, 2021, 12:55:36 PM
My father was a mason. He did everything associated with that trade. Almost always dirty when he came home. Obviously, he did not dress up for work but he told me that in the past masons and the laborers would wear a jacket ties, and slacks to work as if to church. Removed the jacket during work, dusted themselves off and put the jacket on to return home.

But aside from that story, Dad was usually a jovial person, at the worst in fair spirits, don’t remember him ever being angry or bitter or just down. But on the occasional weekend where he and mom were dressing important, it felt like he was getting dressed to get an award. Whistling, singing, joking, everything about just putting on nice clothes was like a soul lifting experience. Although we rarely went to church, when he did, the same reaction, just putting on nice clothes seemed like it was an escape from the worn, stained, faded clothes that made his persona him, into a completely new person. He was no longer just a mason, he got to be himself.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on March 20, 2021, 12:59:43 PM
When you look back at historical film and photos of people out-and-about I am often struck by how "well dressed" they are.
My grandfather died in the late 60s at the age of 90.  He owned a two flat apartment, lived upstairs and rented the downstairs to my family, so I saw a lot of him.  I cannot remember him not wearing a suit and tie.  If he was working in the basement with his tools, he may have taken his jacket off, although I can't remember seeing him like that.  Just sitting in the house smoking his cigar, he would have a suit and tie on, even after he retired.

My father always wore a suit and tie to work.  He was a commercial artist, but I suppose he took off his jacket at work, and he dressed casual on weekends (the transition generation), but my grandfather never did that.  My father owned two or three of those hats too.  They were made by the Stetson company, who is now known only for cowboy hats.  My grandfather had similar hats, but they were woven straw or straw like material.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Hydra009 on March 20, 2021, 04:06:43 PM
When you look back at historical film and photos of people out-and-about I am often struck by how "well dressed" they are. The shift towards casual attire seems to have started in the 1960s. I guess we can view dressing up as just a superficial act, however when I do dress-up, perhaps I behave with just a bit more care, maybe subconsciously. I am sometimes accused for "overdressing", LOL. If you dress like a slob, do you act the part, I wonder?
I doubt they affect how people act as much as how people are perceived to be acting.  You can take a homeless person, clean them up, and put them in a nice suit and you'd be surprised how differently they're treated.

Personally, I dislike formal attire and actively avoid ties.  Not comfortable, constrict at odd places, and impair mobility.  And practically a death sentence in the increasingly hot Southern USA.  I'm glad we went more casual, though I draw the line at Juicy pants, crocs, and whatever the Idiocracy people wear.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 20, 2021, 05:07:21 PM
I doubt they affect how people act as much as how people are perceived to be acting.  You can take a homeless person, clean them up, and put them in a nice suit and you'd be surprised how differently they're treated....
That's an interesting point. I bet both the homeless persons ~and~ the people they encounter will behave differently based on the upgraded attire. I think uniforms of all kinds, for example carry high expectations for behavior.

Sometimes I will give up comfort for impact (even on a hot day) but yeah at the rate the planet is heating up...we may very well see clothing get even more casual as the norm.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 21, 2021, 09:06:52 PM
WTH is this?
(https://i.ibb.co/pLY7wJ8/35daaba0-4.jpg)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Hydra009 on March 21, 2021, 09:18:03 PM
Tasmanian tiger
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 21, 2021, 10:00:13 PM
Since 1996,7 September (the date in 1936 on which the last known Tasmanian Tiger (AKA, the thylacine) died) has been commemorated in Australia as National Threatened Species Day.

In 1983, the American media mogul Ted Turner offered a $100,000 reward for proof of the continued existence of the Tasmanian Tiger.

In March 2005, Australian news magazine The Bulletin, as part of its 125th anniversary celebrations, offered a $1.25 million reward for the safe capture of a live thylacine.

And there is talk of un-extinct-ing the Tasmanian Tiger, the wolf-like carnivorous marsupial was a bit odd in that both males and females had pouches..how sweet! Brilliant idea to put a bounty on their heads.


Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on March 21, 2021, 11:37:15 PM
Tasmanian Tiger.  Must be related to Taz of Looney Tunes fame. :)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Hydra009 on March 22, 2021, 12:26:19 AM
I have one: world's oldest joke (that we know of)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on March 22, 2021, 07:58:38 AM
Thylacine.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 22, 2021, 08:04:50 AM
I have one: world's oldest joke (that we know of)
IDK, but I hope a priest or witchdoctor is involved.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 22, 2021, 08:07:45 AM
Thylacine.
I had to look up the correct pronunciation. With the "hard-i" it does sound "Australian".
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: drunkenshoe on March 22, 2021, 10:23:04 AM
When you look back at historical film and photos of people out-and-about I am often struck by how "well dressed" they are. ...

And I grew up with those hats.  I never had one, because they were for adults.  When I got to be that age, the hats were out, and long hair was in.

My paternal grandfather have pictures dressed in the same style -with friends and people dressed the same- and it looked always unreal to me. Like a movie shot but taken badly, lol. Those hats, the shoes... And they were not some high class family living in some big city. They lived in a small city in middle Black Sea. Imagine that, it is Northern Anatolia. But then probably my perception of the past is pretty distorted because how backwards things have gone in different ways.

But then mom's university photos look the same in a very different way. Obviously, it is the 68, but my folk didn't dress casual in the fashion except out or in some concert, house party, club according to the pics. But their faces, the way they all look is so different. They all have this earnest, bright, original looks. It's hopeful. And those days were so bad around here too. They all look individual in the real sense to me. Maybe because pics are so spontenous and selfies didn't exist. I have no idea, but I'm kind of jelaous.

E: Love this thread...Thanks, Cassia. I was just able to guess Welles and Tazmanian kitty, but looking up others and learning stuff.

Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 22, 2021, 10:27:52 AM
They all have this earnest, bright, original looks.
YES ! That is exactly the same as our old photos. People not so jaded. Almost a bit more innocent and hopeful than we see in today's photos.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on March 22, 2021, 02:08:43 PM
Blackleaf, you said this in another thread:  Texas is practically its own country. It's only the Southern part of Texas that's shit. The rest is fine. And if we could get rid of Abbot, we'll be much better. Florida is the place that, after a school shooting that made national news, decided not to even discuss gun control at all, instead choosing to discuss the "dangers of pornography." Florida has such a reputation for craziness, they turned it into a meme with Florida Man. lol

Did not feel my response would be appropriate for that thread content.  So, I'll post here.  My dad was from Texas, and I still have a bunch of relatives in Texas, mainly in and around Houston.  I've been in Texas several times.  Not impressed--too hot.  And being from Oregon, a state with a much better history than racist Texas.  After all, we never had those 'colored' and 'whites' signs all over the place.  Well, more scales dropped from my eyes in the past week.  Saw an article that had this info:

Oregon’s history of racism
While we may think of Oregon as a progressive state, our history is steeped in racism. The territorial legislature passed a Black exclusion law in 1844. When Oregon became a state in 1859 in the run up to the Civil War, the original constitution banned slavery, but it also prohibited Black people from residing here or owning real estate. Black and Chinese people were originally denied the right to vote. In 1923, Oregon prohibited Japanese Americans from owning real property and allowed cities to deny them business licenses. Two decades later, federal internment camps held approximately 4,000 Oregonians of Japanese ancestry, despite their citizenship. More recently, banks and real estate professionals engaged in a racist lending practice known as “redlining” to keep people out of neighborhoods because of race or nationality. The effects of Oregon’s systemic racism are still felt today.

The above illustrates how my awareness is shaped.  Even with a history degree from college, I did not realize the above.  I should have been very aware of those facts.  I have visited two Oregon towns that had extensive tunnels dug under the city by Chinese workers.  Why?  Because there was a law on the Oregon books that allowed a Chinese person who is out after dark to be gunned down with impunity.  The tunnels were so extensive that the Chinese had a little town in them--jails, barber shops, laundries, shops, opium dens, meeting places, etc.  The prostitutes also used those same tunnels frequently.  Anyway, it shocked me when I learned those facts, and it shouldn't have.  I guess for me to fully understand the extent of just how very, very racist this country is and has been, I have to be slapped up-side the head to get my attention. 
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on March 22, 2021, 02:30:11 PM
I had to look up the correct pronunciation. With the "hard-i" it does sound "Australian".
No real Australian would worry about "correct" pronunciation.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 22, 2021, 02:46:16 PM
Blackleaf, you said this in another thread:  Texas is practically its own country. It's only the Southern part of Texas that's shit. The rest is fine. And if we could get rid of Abbot, we'll be much better. Florida is the place that, after a school shooting that made national news, decided not to even discuss gun control at all, instead choosing to discuss the "dangers of pornography." Florida has such a reputation for craziness, they turned it into a meme with Florida Man. lol

Did not feel my response would be appropriate for that thread content.  So, I'll post here.  My dad was from Texas, and I still have a bunch of relatives in Texas, mainly in and around Houston.  I've been in Texas several times.  Not impressed--too hot.  And being from Oregon, a state with a much better history than racist Texas.  After all, we never had those 'colored' and 'whites' signs all over the place.  Well, more scales dropped from my eyes in the past week.  Saw an article that had this info:

Oregon’s history of racism
While we may think of Oregon as a progressive state, our history is steeped in racism. The territorial legislature passed a Black exclusion law in 1844. When Oregon became a state in 1859 in the run up to the Civil War, the original constitution banned slavery, but it also prohibited Black people from residing here or owning real estate. Black and Chinese people were originally denied the right to vote. In 1923, Oregon prohibited Japanese Americans from owning real property and allowed cities to deny them business licenses. Two decades later, federal internment camps held approximately 4,000 Oregonians of Japanese ancestry, despite their citizenship. More recently, banks and real estate professionals engaged in a racist lending practice known as “redlining” to keep people out of neighborhoods because of race or nationality. The effects of Oregon’s systemic racism are still felt today.

The above illustrates how my awareness is shaped.  Even with a history degree from college, I did not realize the above.  I should have been very aware of those facts.  I have visited two Oregon towns that had extensive tunnels dug under the city by Chinese workers.  Why?  Because there was a law on the Oregon books that allowed a Chinese person who is out after dark to be gunned down with impunity.  The tunnels were so extensive that the Chinese had a little town in them--jails, barber shops, laundries, shops, opium dens, meeting places, etc.  The prostitutes also used those same tunnels frequently.  Anyway, it shocked me when I learned those facts, and it shouldn't have.  I guess for me to fully understand the extent of just how very, very racist this country is and has been, I have to be slapped up-side the head to get my attention.
My family is from New England and NYC originally. After moving around some (including Florida and Georgia) we went back to NY and holy crap those people were not exactly the liberal "melting pot" I expected. Archie Bunker was everywhere. Spent time working out in Kansas as well. Never saw so many rebel army flags in my life. Yeah I am hesitant to use that wide brush anymore. Trump is not from Alabama yet they like him down there just the same.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: aitm on March 22, 2021, 06:15:55 PM
Unfortunately the racist have not only crawled out of their holes, been a shit load of them sitting next to us all along jes playing nice. Massive disappointment in my life.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on March 22, 2021, 06:23:44 PM
Unfortunately the racist have not only crawled out of their holes, been a shit load of them sitting next to us all along jes playing nice. Massive disappointment in my life.
!!!
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 24, 2021, 08:47:41 PM
What does this little girl....
(https://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Linda_Morgan_on_stretcher-Andrea-Doria.jpg)
have to do with this mess?
(https://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/andrea-doria-Stockholm_following_Andrea_Doria_collision.jpg)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on March 24, 2021, 09:16:38 PM
The ship is the Andrea-Doria.  I assume the girl is one of the survivors.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Hydra009 on March 25, 2021, 02:24:20 AM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linda_Morgan

Her husband became the mayor of San Antonio in 2005.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 25, 2021, 07:59:18 AM
Yeah, the girl actually got 'transferred' from one ship to the other during the collision. To call it a miracle is nonsense but I would like to ask those using this description about why gawd didn't just cancel the accident instead of helping one person, since he knew that 51 others were being crushed or drowned. I think the Andrea Doria was a beautiful ship that took 11 hours to sink after getting rammed by the Stockholm.
(https://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints-depot-restricted/ships/ships-other/ss_andrea_doria_1956_ocean_liner-89679.jpg)

Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on March 25, 2021, 08:48:46 AM
Yeah, the girl actually got 'transferred' from one ship to the other during the collision. To call it a miracle is nonsense but I would like to ask those using this description about why gawd didn't just cancel the accident instead of helping one person, since he knew that 51 others were being crushed or drowned. I think the Andrea Doria was a beautiful ship that took 11 hours to sink after getting rammed by the Stockholm.
(https://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints-depot-restricted/ships/ships-other/ss_andrea_doria_1956_ocean_liner-89679.jpg)


I had to read up on the Andrea-Doria to learn that this girl was identified as the "Miracle Girl."  I didn't stop to think about miracles when I read it. But it's true that unusual circumstances of survival are often referred to as miracles.  For the deeply religious, they become actual miracles.  Most readers probably recognize the explanation as just an exaggeration of a wonderful event and accept it as an unusual good fortune.  But even that is wrong.  It is not unusual to find survivors in disasters.  It happens all the time.

Why is an infant the sole survivor of an airplane crash?  Does god love babies?  If so, why not ask why he hated all the other people on the plane?
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on March 25, 2021, 09:54:52 AM

Why is an infant the sole survivor of an airplane crash?  Does god love babies?  If so, why not ask why he hated all the other people on the plane?
This question occurred to me fairly early.  And later, when someone said--'There but for the grace of god, go I!', struck me as not a statement of humility, but was a form of bragging.  God loves me and granted me grace, but did not like you and fucked you up.  The christian mind is just empty except for a bunch of platitudes.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on March 25, 2021, 10:45:15 AM
This question occurred to me fairly early.  And later, when someone said--'There but for the grace of god, go I!', struck me as not a statement of humility, but was a form of bragging.  God loves me and granted me grace, but did not like you and fucked you up.  The christian mind is just empty except for a bunch of platitudes.
The question occurred to me early too.  It's the kind of question a child would ask before a parent hushes him and teaches that it is impolite to ask such questions to a person of belief (as if beliefs are sacred).  Asking simple questions like that to a theist can evoke defensive reactions, like becoming patronizing and superior, or it could evoke the playing of the victim card, because there are no logical responses to such simple questions, and deep down we all know that.  "There, but for the grace of God, go I," is especially illogical, because it is irrelevant and doesn't even address the question.  But it does avoid the question, which is probably the intention, along with making it clear that the person believes himself to be superior.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 31, 2021, 09:19:00 PM
Who dat?
(https://preview.redd.it/etza2bqnl8q61.jpg?width=640&crop=smart&auto=webp&s=48bffcc2c4525441edabd92d2ae87b59f67f7184)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Hydra009 on March 31, 2021, 09:50:10 PM
A young Bill Clinton meeting JFK.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on March 31, 2021, 10:09:14 PM
A young Bill Clinton meeting JFK.
Isn't that crazy !?! Neither one could know that two presidents were shaking hands.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on April 03, 2021, 10:02:23 PM
Lasting from 1299 to 1922, but he was the last _________
(https://www.msxlabs.org/forum/attachments/61988d1487456588-osmanli-padisahlari-sultan-mehmed-vahdetdin-sultan-mehmed-vahdetdin.jpg)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on April 03, 2021, 10:29:50 PM
The last Ottoman sultan????
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on April 03, 2021, 11:16:12 PM
The last Ottoman sultan????
How was that for a run? Think the USA will outlast that?
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: drunkenshoe on April 04, 2021, 04:33:52 AM
Vahdettin. (Mehmed VI)

On empires and the evolution of their life spans... I think history is trying to tell us something. (Lassie appeared in front my eyes for a sec... :p)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on April 05, 2021, 07:39:04 PM
What is this device called? Was it a good idea?
(https://i.ibb.co/QN4cDYc/418.jpg)
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on April 05, 2021, 08:07:26 PM
I can't tell you what it's called but I remember being told what it was for.  Do I have to explain?
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on April 05, 2021, 08:25:05 PM
Bundle board, I think. 
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: aitm on April 05, 2021, 08:33:41 PM
Naturally, he has his hand on his sword.....😏
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on April 05, 2021, 09:39:28 PM
I think it was sweet. The idea of "bundling" was to talk all night and get to know each other. And also the trust the parents had in their kids. If the best you could do was stare at the ceiling you might be "out". Better have a few sonnets ready, LOL.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 06, 2021, 08:39:13 AM
Actually, in bundling they sewed the young man into a bundle so he couldn't do ... anything. Allowed for "pillow talk" and not much else. One hopes he remember to hit the chamber pot before that.

The open door is another part of the gimmick. "No proper lady should ever be behind closed doors with her suitor."
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on April 07, 2021, 10:42:46 AM
Actually, in bundling they sewed the young man into a bundle so he couldn't do ... anything. Allowed for "pillow talk" and not much else. One hopes he remember to hit the chamber pot before that.

The open door is another part of the gimmick. "No proper lady should ever be behind closed doors with her suitor."
The good old days.  How we all yearn for a return to normality.  <sigh>
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 07, 2021, 12:40:54 PM
As I understand it the young lady secreted a needle and a bit of thread so as to close  up any holes that mysteriously form in the bundle during the night. I'm sure the place where the hole would form could be found easily in the dark.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on May 01, 2021, 05:39:36 PM
(https://daily.jstor.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/sophie_scholl_1050x700.jpg)
Her bust is located in the Walhalla memorial along the Danube. Who, Why?
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on May 01, 2021, 08:02:40 PM
Was she a member of The White Rose?  I don't remember her name.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Hydra009 on May 01, 2021, 08:45:40 PM
Yes, Sophie Scholl.  Executed along with her brother and friend by the nazis for distributing antiwar leaflets.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on May 01, 2021, 09:03:26 PM
Brave gal. Sometimes I wonder what I would have under the same circumstances.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on May 01, 2021, 09:59:42 PM
She was not as heroic as it seems.  After all, she is antifa!!  It was right to execute her--just a rabble rouser.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Hydra009 on May 01, 2021, 10:07:52 PM
Her last leaflet was smuggled out of Germany and dropped by allied planes.  Aside from making the students widely known in Germany, it didn't have much of an effect on the actual war.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Hydra009 on May 02, 2021, 03:38:49 PM
Here's a question for you history buffs, which hat(s) did historical cowboys actually wear?
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: aitm on May 02, 2021, 04:07:52 PM
Here's a question for you history buffs, which hat(s) did historical cowboys actually wear?
Don’t know the name of it, but I think it’s the type that is associated with Bat Masterson. Kind of a derby thing?
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Cassia on May 02, 2021, 06:14:14 PM
Don’t know the name of it, but I think it’s the type that is associated with Bat Masterson. Kind of a derby thing?
Another case where Hollywood movies define our collective idea of history.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: SGOS on May 02, 2021, 06:40:44 PM
In googling old pictures, the most common cowboy hats kind of resemble today's most common "rodeo style" hats, but look like they have been dragged through dust and swept downstream.  I don't know if these photos show actual cowboys or just dudes dressed up for pictures.  One article suggested the bowler Bat Masterson hat as common, along with some funny looking things worn by Billy the Kid and Jessie James.  However a comment from one guy who kind of seemed like he knew what he was talking about said the photos were not representative of actual cow punching cowboys.  So I'm waiting for hydra to settle the issue, if he can.

Apparently there are modern innovations in cowboy hats, probably mostly the work of Hollywood.  Those black  flatish Bad Lands hats that the bad guys wear, are kind of cool, but I don't think were common.  Having spent 45 years in Montana I've tried on a few cowboy hats in western shops, but I don't think they suit me at all.  I wear glasses, and real cowboys don't wear glasses; They just squint.  Then I take off my glasses, and I can't see what I look like in the mirror.  OK, I'm not that bad, but I still don't look at home in a cowboy hat.  Fortunately I come from the mountains and forests, where hard hats are worn in bars and restaurants, and cowboy hats are seldom seen.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Hydra009 on May 02, 2021, 07:07:09 PM
It's kind of a trick question, since historical cowboys wore a variety of hats, so there isn't one right answer.    Bowlers, derbies, sombreros, caps, and what we now consider "cowboy" hats (at the time, they were called Stetson hats after its inventor).  The last one really caught on and nowadays has become synonymous with cowboys, but that wasn't always the case.  It'd be like considering crossbows to be the quintessential medieval european weapon.

Also, a great many historical cowboys were ethnically Hispanic or native American (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cowboy#Spanish_roots) and about 1 in 4 were black (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/lesser-known-history-african-american-cowboys-180962144/).
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on May 02, 2021, 08:55:33 PM
Sombreros were popular. Remington's paintings are considered accurate insofar as I remember.
Title: Re: da History Quiz Thread
Post by: Mike Cl on May 02, 2021, 09:08:25 PM
It's kind of a trick question, since historical cowboys wore a variety of hats, so there isn't one right answer.    Bowlers, derbies, sombreros, caps, and what we now consider "cowboy" hats (at the time, they were called Stetson hats after its inventor).  The last one really caught on and nowadays has become synonymous with cowboys, but that wasn't always the case.  It'd be like considering crossbows to be the quintessential medieval european weapon.

Also, a great many historical cowboys were ethnically Hispanic or native American (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cowboy#Spanish_roots) and about 1 in 4 were black (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/lesser-known-history-african-american-cowboys-180962144/).
More stuff that our schools mislead us about, especially in the area of history.