Author Topic: Woodworking  (Read 7965 times)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2016, 02:47:05 PM »
Lancelot the chain saw. Lol.

Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2016, 02:42:26 AM »
Thanks for the tip Pappy..
So I got this Chinese made plough plane and it works surprisingly well for cheap, but the irons on this thing are much harder than I expected which is good and bad I guess. The good is once I have them honed well they're likely to stay that way, but holy bajoly this stuff barely scratches on the coarse grit stone and being from China it's of course not flat as it should be. It's tempting to try to straighten with a hammer, but I know that isn't going to lead anywhere good..

The reason I bought it was some of the reviews were pretty good and the price was right on Amazon..
These Asian planes are tough to set straight initially, but once they're set they cut well and straight and a hell of a lot cheaper than the heavy cast iron planes.
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Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #17 on: February 16, 2016, 02:44:28 AM »
Lancelot the chain saw. Lol.
King Arthur tools.. I guess someone was into monty python or something..
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Re: Woodworking
« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2016, 07:38:07 AM »
^ this.
A knife "steel" would be the thing, I think, for very sharp edges. I used to shave with a Gerber Mk. I.

« Last Edit: February 16, 2016, 07:41:39 AM by Gawdzilla Sama »
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers

Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #19 on: February 16, 2016, 11:45:04 AM »
A knife "steel" would be the thing, I think, for very sharp edges. I used to shave with a Gerber Mk. I.

(Image removed from quote.)
I have one plane iron I just couldn't get an edge on no matter how long I stood there at the stone so I made a jig and used the kitchen steel..sharpest iron I have now..Stone helps keep the edge, but the steel got it there.. A kitchen steel is really nothing more than a file  oriented different from a flat file..Don't underestimate a good kitchen steel..lol
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Re: Woodworking
« Reply #20 on: February 16, 2016, 02:41:25 PM »
As this project goes along, it would be great if you could post some pics.

Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #21 on: February 18, 2016, 10:16:17 AM »
As this project goes along, it would be great if you could post some pics.
Well,  just for practice I like to make tenon and mortise joints by hand..it's all done with a chisel and mallet..if that helps..


With a bit of practice most anyone should be able to cut a mortise (the hole) with a chisel in about 20 minutes or less. Now you could go buy a dedicated motising machine for about $300 OR spend about $8 for a good sharp chisel..
« Last Edit: February 18, 2016, 10:21:09 AM by AllPurposeAtheist »
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Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #22 on: February 18, 2016, 10:25:56 AM »
So I was wondering if anyone has ever tried their hand at steaming wood to bend it..
I ran across this site that describes a cheapo steam box..  I've never tried it, but it's interesting anyway..
http://www.wood-w.com/wood-materials/quick-tips-questions-answers-6.html
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Re: Woodworking
« Reply #23 on: February 18, 2016, 12:06:48 PM »
Well,  just for practice I like to make tenon and mortise joints by hand..it's all done with a chisel and mallet..if that helps..
With a bit of practice most anyone should be able to cut a mortise (the hole) with a chisel in about 20 minutes or less. Now you could go buy a dedicated motising machine for about $300 OR spend about $8 for a good sharp chisel..

Thanks for the pics.  This summer I hope to make a new aquarium stand, but its still in my head, so I will be watching this thread for ideas and buzz words so I can look up more info.

*Just watched a youtube vid on tenon / mortise joints. 

Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #24 on: February 18, 2016, 02:40:05 PM »
Nice site for plans for aquarium stands perhaps..  However, I just got a warning that the site may contain malware and phishing stuff.. Use your better judgment
http://www.woodworkersworkshop.com/resources/index.php?search=Aquarium+stand+

I've never had a problem with the site so it could just be someone who doesn't like the site reporting it as a malware site.. I've been there many times before with no problems at all until today..

Watch how Paul Sellers chops mortises. It might take several tries to get it right so be willing to practice with wood scraps till you get it down pat..
« Last Edit: February 18, 2016, 02:43:26 PM by AllPurposeAtheist »
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Re: Woodworking
« Reply #25 on: February 18, 2016, 08:34:48 PM »
Well,  just for practice I like to make tenon and mortise joints by hand..it's all done with a chisel and mallet..if that helps..
(Image removed from quote.)
(Image removed from quote.)
With a bit of practice most anyone should be able to cut a mortise (the hole) with a chisel in about 20 minutes or less. Now you could go buy a dedicated motising machine for about $300 OR spend about $8 for a good sharp chisel..
:c029: I bow to you sir. I believe you when you say its easier than I probably think, but I still bow to you none the less. That is some very nice looking joinery.
Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false and by the rulers as useful

Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2016, 03:37:28 AM »
:c029: I bow to you sir. I believe you when you say its easier than I probably think, but I still bow to you none the less. That is some very nice looking joinery.
Thanks, but it's not as good as the picture may indicate. The shoulder cuts aren't true.  I used a plain old back saw,but I did make another recently with a chisel for the shoulder cuts and through its much more time consuming they turn out very crisp.
It's something like this (just scrap) bevel side down and just make short cuts up to the knife wall to the depth you want then turn it length wise and split it with the same chisel. The mortise is simple. Just cut from both sides and your cuts meet somewhere in the center of the board so you don't get tear out.. Don't try to cut it all from one side or you'll ruin the wood.  An inexpensive marking gauge is pretty much mandatory, but I suppose you could do that with a knife and steel rule, but the marking gauge it much more accurate. I like this round gauge, but you can grab a square one at harbor freight for just a few bucks..


Man, I really need to get a cabinet makers vise. The vise I've been using is a cheapo Pony bench vise .I cut the wood faces to replace the steel faces and it works for the most part, but definitely has limitations.
Sometime soon I'm going to build a laminated bench. I'm probably going to use the design from the Paul Sellers videos.
  I don't know that I'll go quite as extreme as Paul, but the basic principles are there..He makes everything look a whole lot easier than it is at first, but practice practice practice..
« Last Edit: February 19, 2016, 03:52:15 AM by AllPurposeAtheist »
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Re: Woodworking
« Reply #27 on: February 19, 2016, 07:13:34 AM »
As stated most joints can be drilled out at a size slightly larger than a screw head. The piece being joined should be tapped to a size small we than the ace thread. Use wood glue for additional support and dowels with alligned wood grain to hide screw holes, glueing them as well sand, stain, poly if you so choose.

Good luck.

Faith in selfless Unity for Good.


Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #28 on: February 19, 2016, 08:49:55 AM »
As stated most joints can be drilled out at a size slightly larger than a screw head. The piece being joined should be tapped to a size small we than the ace thread. Use wood glue for additional support and dowels with alligned wood grain to hide screw holes, glueing them as well sand, stain, poly if you so choose.

Good luck.

Faith in selfless Unity for Good.


Just watched a video using what he calls Green and Green style which uses screws hidden with plugs.. Interesting stuff..
It's basically box joints with an Asian twist which I like by the way.. I might just make a jewelry box for my granddaughter with the style and lock in place with pegs instead of screws..
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Admit it. You're secretly green with envy.

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #29 on: February 19, 2016, 09:17:07 AM »
Don't remember if I posted this here before, but whatahey. (No, I didn't do the entire building, just the sign.)

We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers