Author Topic: Woodworking  (Read 13567 times)

Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Woodworking
« on: February 13, 2016, 05:49:07 PM »
Might as well start a thread for the topic..
So I'm fixin to make a rocking chair based on the design of the chairs here except instead of the Walmart method of screwing crap together I'm trying to decide what types of joints to use. I'll probably use a few different types of wood, maple and perhaps oak,but figuring out which joints to use where is kind of stumping me right now..

Any suggestions from you other wood workers out there?

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Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2016, 05:53:09 PM »
Oh yeah..finished the towel rack.. I used some danish oil and topped with linseed oil.. Turned out ok..
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Re: Woodworking
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2016, 07:35:57 PM »
Watch "The Patriot" (Mel Gibson) first.

Plans available online.
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers

Offline kilodelta

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2016, 08:02:18 PM »
Nice rack.
Faith: pretending to know things you don't know

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2016, 08:34:28 PM »


Any suggestions from you other wood workers out there?
Well the design of it kind of begs for mortice and tenon joinery. At least for most of those joints. Of course mortice and tenon isn't easy. Easier with the right tools ($$$$) but still not easy.

Forstner drill bits and wood dowels would also work for most of it and would be easier than mortice and tenon while still a nice upgrade in craftsmanship over just screwing it together.

A pocket screw jig would also work and do a nice job if you happen to have one and you're not opposed to cheating a bit (i.e. taking the easy way out) on your joinery. I have the $100+ Kreg pocket jig kit and I use it all the time. Well worth the investment.

But yeah, a set of forstner bits and dowels would work and wouldn't be too expensive. For the back, you could run a dado in the top and bottom pieces with either a router table or dado blade in a table saw, then set the spindles and use flush insert pieces to fill the gaps in the dado between the spindles.
Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false and by the rulers as useful

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2016, 09:29:32 PM »
http://chairplandiy.com/

 I built some Adirondack chairs from a kit years ago. What I did was buy 1 cheap kit and use it as a pattern for the parts, with better material (Redwood). You could try that, but another approach is just go to where they sell fine furniture and measure the chairs and take pictures. If you use mortise and tenon/tongue and groove joinery, like Johan said, really requires special tools, unless you are really into careful chisel work and a lot of patience. The problem with that is you slip up and you can ruin a piece of wood. I am pretty well set up tool wise, with a table saw and most of the necessary hand tools including Forstner bits if I chose to do that.

I'm planning to build a picnic table this summer but don't have a pattern or style of table picked out yet. If I build one I'll put pictures on here.

Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2016, 11:54:05 PM »
I'm ok with the chisels for the tenon and mortises.. Yep, easy to mess up, but the joints fit nicely usually.. The only part that I really have reservations about is the seat which I may carve out with an angle grinder and a set of KA chainsaw wheels IF I can get up the nerve to do it without chopping off more body parts.. I have some forstner bits so I'm good to go there.. I really need to work on getting my chisels sharper.. They're fairly sharp, but I need them much sharper.  I'm going to get a leather strop sooner or later..
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Re: Woodworking
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2016, 12:05:29 PM »
.... without chopping off more body parts.. .. I really need to work on getting my chisels sharper.. They're fairly sharp, but I need them much sharper.
You've already chopped off Body Parts?!   
 Eeek... 
Are you sure you want to go sharper?

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2016, 01:25:39 PM »
Dull chisels split wood instead of shaving it.
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2016, 01:28:49 PM »
Dull chisels split wood instead of shaving it.

^ this.

Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2016, 01:34:30 PM »
I'm currently at about 400 grit on my chisels and know that will dull rather quickly and does.. I saw some diamond plate on ebay cheap 400, 800 and 1200. I'm not sure what difference, if anything beyond 1200 will really make, but I don't suppose 18000 grit can hurt, but I do have other things to do with my life than just sharpen chisels..lol
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Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2016, 01:40:55 PM »
You've already chopped off Body Parts?!   
 Eeek... 
Are you sure you want to go sharper?
Cutting them isn't nearly as bad as ripping them.. I'm missing about 1/4 inch from my finger.. That happened about 2 weeks ago. Yesterday I banged the same finger into a vise and it hurt a hell of a lot more than when I first cut it.. I could feel the tip of my finger hurt all the way down to my little toes.. Somehow I have the feeling that my finger tip is going to give me a lot of grief in the years to come..
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Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2016, 01:46:06 PM »
So... Anyone ever use one of these monsters? It's basically a chain saw for an angle grinder.. I also read they're good for grinding stumps and I have a few of them to get rid of as well..
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Offline AllPurposeAtheist (OP)

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2016, 01:48:00 PM »
Watch "The Patriot" (Mel Gibson) first.

Plans available online.
Sorry..Gibson is a moron or as the rubes would say, "Get a life moran!"  Lol
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Admit it. You're secretly green with envy.

Re: Woodworking
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2016, 02:39:38 PM »
I'm currently at about 400 grit on my chisels and know that will dull rather quickly and does.. I saw some diamond plate on ebay cheap 400, 800 and 1200. I'm not sure what difference, if anything beyond 1200 will really make, but I don't suppose 18000 grit can hurt, but I do have other things to do with my life than just sharpen chisels..lol

Grit is complicated because it means different things to different types of surfaces. It isn't even the same across different manufactures of the same type of sharpener. A 1200 grit DMT diamond hone is courser than a 1200 grit waterstone. A Norton x-fine diamond is probably equal to about 900 grit US sandpaper. A DMT x-fine diamond is about the same as 1200 sandpaper. The only real way to tell is if you know the micron size of the abrasive.

I've got 3 combo stones I use on chisels along with a Garret Wade guide. A DMT diamond x-course/course combo (60/45 micron). A DMT diamond fine/x-fine combo (25/10 micron). A Lee Valley 4000/8000 combo Japanese waterstone (2/1 micron). I almost never use the diamond stones unless I'm removing a chip or changing an angle. The 8000 grit waterstone is about the equivalent of jeweler's rouge. I try to keep the final bevel at about 25 degrees because it stays sharper longer and doesn't require as much maintenance. A dozen passes on the 4000 and twice that on the 8000 after use keeps them shaving sharp once you've got your initial edge on them. A good chisel is high carbon steel so it will rust. I use carnauba car wax on mine to keep that from happening.
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