Author Topic: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution  (Read 1670 times)

Offline TonyT (OP)

Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« on: November 04, 2015, 02:33:31 PM »
I'd like to share my new website with you all:

http://AtlasoftheHumanJourney.com/

It uses interactive maps to chart the story of hominid evolution and migration over the course of 7 million years. You can click on different dates to see the maps change over time and you can click on the archaeological finds on the maps to see pictures and link to more information.

Please give me any feedback with regards to any errors, site design, functionality, and content. Thanks.



Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2015, 03:11:11 PM »
Thanks. Be aware that we have rules about videos that might be deemed self promoting; especially since this is your first post. Might want to read the faq. But I certainly applaud your effort and I'd like to see it kept.

Offline TonyT (OP)

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2015, 03:33:47 PM »
Thanks. I am not promoting a product, just a personal website I made about human evolution.

Offline SGOS

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2015, 04:25:09 PM »
The Museum of Natural History (The Field Museum) in Chicago was one of my favorite haunts until I left Chicago at the age of 17.  There was a display called The Dawn of Man which featured a series of dioramas of perhaps 7 or 8 cases of life sized wax figures depicting mostly family groups, showing the evolution of man doing things in life like natural habitats.  While it was no doubt inaccurate by todays standards (much of we know about physical anthropology has greatly changed since the early 1960s, as recent readings have surprised me a great deal from what I learned in college), it was fascinating and one of my favorite exhibits.

I revisited the place a couple of years ago, and it cost me a $100 membership to get me and 3 other guests in.  It used to be free.  It was disappointing that the display was gone and replaced by a comparatively informative display, but quite lackluster in comparison.  When I inquired about the old display to an attendant, a younger woman who probably had never seen it, told me it was removed, not because it was inaccurate (according to her), but because it was racist, although I certainly didn't recall anything racist about it.  I'm not sure she had her information correct.  However, it WAS inaccurate by todays standards.  Many of the prehistoric groups which were thought to be direct ancestors, are now considered branches that went extinct, but were not part of our direct evolutionary chain.

Replacing it with an up to date series of finely detailed wax figures is probably too expensive for the best of museums today.  I can't imagine what the original display would cost in today's dollars.  I'd guess in the millions of dollars.

None the less, thanks for the link to your site.  I like this kind of stuff.

Offline Baruch

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2015, 08:14:21 PM »
SGOS ... probably PC racist ... since most cave man displays showed darker skinned ancestors, and they get more Nordic as you get to the present time.  Given our shared African origins, it is likely that Australopithecines were pretty dark.  Only those early Europeans that followed the retreating glaciers north after 10,000 BCE ... developed paleness to survive the hardy conditions of the far north ... their ancestors were probably more of the Mediterranean type, since that was where they were living during the height of the last Ice Age.

TonyT ... do they still have something similar ... on the National Geographic website?  It was pretty informative 10 years ago.  You might want to compare.
שלום

Offline SGOS

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2015, 09:18:28 PM »
SGOS ... probably PC racist ...



That was my assumption also.

Offline TonyT (OP)

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2015, 01:21:48 PM »
TonyT ... do they still have something similar ... on the National Geographic website?  It was pretty informative 10 years ago.  You might want to compare.

The National Geographic page you are referring to is about tracing the migrations of modern man using DNA. It is not about earlier hominids like Homo erectus, Australopithecus, etc.

I don't believe there is any other site quite like this one. At least I have not come across it. There are of course some book atlases about human evolution, but nothing interactive on the web like this.

Offline aitm

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2015, 01:35:51 PM »
Very nice. Seems that there is a problem with the pages HE and HS, can't seen to get the Sapien map, its shows erectus instead?
A humans desire to live is exceeded only by their willingness to die for another. Even god cannot equal this magnificent sacrifice. No god has the right to judge them.-first tenant of the Panotheust

Offline TonyT (OP)

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2015, 09:28:51 AM »
Really? The first time period for the map entitled "Age of Homo sapiens" is 130,000 years ago. This first map still shows the range of Homo erectus in Asia because they still existed there. Perhaps that is what you mean?

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2015, 02:13:15 PM »
Wow. I like this!

Gerard
The Historical Atlas of Europe
But as man exists in nature, I am not authorized to say that his formation, is above the power of nature.
Paul Henri Thiry Baron d' Holbach, (1723-1789)

Offline josephpalazzo

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #10 on: December 13, 2015, 02:16:08 PM »
Nicely done.

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #11 on: December 13, 2015, 02:16:25 PM »
SGOS ... probably PC racist ... since most cave man displays showed darker skinned ancestors, and they get more Nordic as you get to the present time.  Given our shared African origins, it is likely that Australopithecines were pretty dark.  Only those early Europeans that followed the retreating glaciers north after 10,000 BCE ... developed paleness to survive the hardy conditions of the far north ... their ancestors were probably more of the Mediterranean type, since that was where they were living during the height of the last Ice Age.

TonyT ... do they still have something similar ... on the National Geographic website?  It was pretty informative 10 years ago.  You might want to compare.
Australopithecines didn't need to be dark. They had fur.

Gerard
The Historical Atlas of Europe
But as man exists in nature, I am not authorized to say that his formation, is above the power of nature.
Paul Henri Thiry Baron d' Holbach, (1723-1789)

Offline TonyT (OP)

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2016, 12:47:40 PM »
TonyT ... do they still have something similar ... on the National Geographic website?  It was pretty informative 10 years ago.  You might want to compare.

The National Geographic page you are referring to is about tracing the migrations of modern man using DNA. It is not about earlier hominids like Homo erectus, Australopithecus, etc.

I don't believe there is any other site quite like this one. At least I have not come across it. There are of course some book atlases about human evolution, but nothing interactive on the web like this.

To avoid confusion with the existing National Geographic website called “Atlas of the Human Journey”, I decided to rename my site “Atlas of Human Evolution” and move it to the URL AtlasofHumanEvolution.com.

The site is also now available in Spanish, click on the flag in the top-right corner.

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2016, 02:21:02 PM »
Australopithecines didn't need to be dark. They had fur.

Gerard
I thought it was feathers. Who had feathers? I'm quite lost.
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers

Re: Interactive Atlas of Human Evolution
« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2016, 04:57:04 PM »
I thought it was feathers. Who had feathers? I'm quite lost.

Australian aborigines have vestigial quills? I'm not sure......