Author Topic: Why Religious People Ignore Facts  (Read 1640 times)

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Why Religious People Ignore Facts
« on: April 29, 2015, 10:00:26 AM »
Image credit: Adam Maida
By T. M. Luhrmann

Most of us find it mind-boggling that some people seem willing to ignore the facts — on climate change, on vaccines, on health care — if the facts conflict with their sense of what someone like them believes. “But those are the facts,” you want to say. “It seems weird to deny them.”

And yet a broad group of scholars is beginning to demonstrate that religious belief and factual belief are indeed different kinds of mental creatures. People process evidence differently when they think with a factual mind-set rather than with a religious mind-set. Even what they count as evidence is different. And they are motivated differently, based on what they conclude. On what grounds do scholars make such claims?

First of all, they have noticed that the very language people use changes when they talk about religious beings, and the changes mean that they think about their realness differently. You do not say, “I believe that my dog is alive.” The fact is so obvious it is not worth stating. You simply talk in ways that presume the dog’s aliveness — you say she’s adorable or hungry or in need of a walk. But to say, “I believe that Jesus Christ is alive” signals that you know that other people might not think so. It also asserts reverence and piety. We seem to regard religious beliefs and factual beliefs with what the philosopher Neil Van Leeuwen calls different “cognitive attitudes.”

Second, these scholars have remarked that when people consider the truth of a religious belief, what the belief does for their lives matters more than, well, the facts. We evaluate factual beliefs often with perceptual evidence. If I believe that the dog is in the study but I find her in the kitchen, I change my belief. We evaluate religious beliefs more with our sense of destiny, purpose and the way we think the world should be. One study found that over 70 percent of people who left a religious cult did so because of a conflict of values. They did not complain that the leader’s views were mistaken. They believed that he was a bad person.

Third, these scholars have found that religious and factual beliefs play different roles in interpreting the same events. Religious beliefs explain why, rather than how. People who understand readily that diseases are caused by natural processes might still attribute sickness at a particular time to demons, or healing to an act of God. The psychologist Cristine H. Legare and her colleagues recently demonstrated that people use both natural and supernatural explanations in this interdependent way across many cultures.

They tell a story, as recounted by Tracy Kidder’s book on the anthropologist and physician Paul Farmer, about a woman who had taken her tuberculosis medication and been cured — and who then told Dr. Farmer that she was going to get back at the person who had used sorcery to make her ill. “But if you believe that,” he cried, “why did you take your medicines?” In response to the great doctor she replied, in essence, “Honey, are you incapable of complexity?”

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http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/19/opinion/sunday/t-m-luhrmann-faith-vs-facts.html?_r=2
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Re: Why Religious People Ignore Facts
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2015, 07:26:26 PM »
  Sometimes I get the impression , they have a certain amount of pride being able to believe in something, without having the evidence for it.

 Maybe it's due to bible verses like this ?

Quote
Jesus saith unto him, Thomas, because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed.

Termin 1:1

 Evolution is probably the slowest biological process on planet earth, the only one that comes close is the understanding of it by creationists.

Re: Why Religious People Ignore Facts
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2015, 07:43:10 PM »
  Sometimes I get the impression , they have a certain amount of pride being able to believe in something, without having the evidence for it.

 Maybe it's due to bible verses like this ?
Yeah, I think you are right.  The babble is full of verses such as these.  The strongest faith is faith that has no foundation in reality.  So, the most faithful, are the most blind.  Only they don't call it being blind, but that the scales fell from their eyes and they could finally rightfully see.  So, the flock is always praised for being blind and ignorant.  And proud of it!
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?