Author Topic: The Scariest Books Ever  (Read 3287 times)

Offline SGOS

Re: The Scariest Books Ever
« Reply #15 on: January 09, 2015, 07:42:45 AM »
The Old Testament about going to hell for eternity when you die is the only book that ever scared me reading it. Next would be reading that the sun will engulf the world in a fireball some day, and wondering where I will be before that.  :eek: Neither brings much comfort.  :fU: :kidra:
Personally, I don't find the Bible scary.  Perhaps I would have when I was younger, like before I could read well enough to tackle the Bible.  There are certainly horrific and violent parts, but they are poorly written.  They lack character development, and continuity, and the writers are unskilled.  It lacks a lot of character background.  Why is God described as such a dick head, and at the same time claimed to be merciful?  It makes no sense.   Why is he like that?

I have to force myself to pay attention when I read it because it has this rhythm of bla bla blabbity bla.  It's just not interesting.  I think the Book of Revelations is supposed to be scary, but it just comes off as wildly strange.  I can't read it without wondering what the fuck the writer was thinking that caused him to write such utter nonsense.

I was somewhat moved by the Gospels, but I read them at a time when I believed Jesus was real.  As soon as I stopped believing in magic, the life of Christ was no longer interesting to me.  Compare the Bible to other well know inspirational works of fiction.  For example, the Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens.   That story is inspirational even to me as an atheist, because a skilled word smith put some thought it to the project.

Re: The Scariest Books Ever
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2015, 03:26:23 PM »

I was somewhat moved by the Gospels, but I read them at a time when I believed Jesus was real.  As soon as I stopped believing in magic, the life of Christ was no longer interesting to me.  Compare the Bible to other well know inspirational works of fiction.  For example, the Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens.   That story is inspirational even to me as an atheist, because a skilled word smith put some thought it to the project.
I think you said that quite well.  The Bible was not written nor was it cobbled together with poetry in mind, but with politics.  Politics has always driven the bible and it's contents.  And that was from the very beginning until this very moment.
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Offline dtq123

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Re: The Scariest Books Ever
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2015, 06:00:07 PM »
I think you said that quite well.  The Bible was not written nor was it cobbled together with poetry in mind, but with politics.  Politics has always driven the bible and it's contents.  And that was from the very beginning until this very moment.

So wait... they had politics way back then?
I thought there was just a king who ruled on all the Israelites or whatever.
 
A dark cloud looms over.
Festive cheer does not help much.
What is this, "Justice?"

Offline Mr.Obvious

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Re: The Scariest Books Ever
« Reply #18 on: January 10, 2015, 10:59:22 AM »
If game of thrones is any indication; monarchies involve quite a lot of politics.
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Offline Deidre32

Re: The Scariest Books Ever
« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2015, 04:36:47 PM »
Oddly, I thought Misery, by Stephen King was terrifying...scarier than the movie, and there were differences in the book as compared to the movie. I remember the ending was surprising to me, and I couldn't sleep for a few nights. ^_^
The only lasting beauty, is the beauty of the heart. - Rumi