Author Topic: Is Evolution Predictable?  (Read 2151 times)

Offline stromboli

Is Evolution Predictable?
« on: February 21, 2013, 09:26:17 AM »
this:
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Quote
Understanding how and why diversification occurs is important for understanding why there are so many species on Earth. In a new study published on 19 February in the open access journal PLOS Biology,

Quote

The second quote to me is the question- given that we see similar development in E Coli over time, with different environments, where then do we encounter diversity? In the case of E Coli, we are talking a very short lifespan. In larger organisms with longer age and even wider spread- with rats, for example- what are the factors that drive diversity?
Any geneticists on here I'd love some input.
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Offline bennyboy

(No subject)
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2013, 02:35:34 PM »
I'm not a geneticist, but I don't find this result all that surprising.  Given that a phenotype must be represented at the genetic level, and that in a strongly-controlled environment, the same phenotype may provide a statistical advantage every time, especially in simpler organisms.  I'm curious-- when you say "different environments," do you just mean they were isolated from each other, or were they different in composition?

Also, go UBC!  (my alma mater)
Insanity is the only sensible response to the universe.  The sane are just making stuff up.

(No subject)
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2013, 02:43:22 PM »
It may not be predictable now, but I think we will soon not only be able to predict it, but to control it!!

Why do I say this?  Easy, We have figured out how DNA is contructed (not completely but) enough to store data on DNA strands!!

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

If they can watch changes in the DNA and unlock the mytery of what configurations do, we could arguably change that to eraticate things such as AIDS and Down Syndrome. (I pick these because they are two negative effect of evolution.)

Re:
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2013, 02:44:05 PM »
Quote from: "bennyboy"
I'm not a geneticist, but I don't find this result all that surprising.  Given that a phenotype must be represented at the genetic level, and that in a strongly-controlled environment, the same phenotype may provide a statistical advantage every time, especially in simpler organisms.  I'm curious-- when you say "different environments," do you just mean they were isolated from each other, or were they different in composition?

Also, go UBC!  (my alma mater)

Not necessarily, the colour of a siamese cats coat is dependent on the temperature it was raised in. The same genotype produces different phenotypes based solely on the environment.

"The pointed pattern [1] is a form of partial albinism, resulting from a mutation in tyrosinase, an enzyme involved in melanin production. The mutated enzyme is heat-sensitive; it fails to work at normal body temperatures, but becomes active in cooler areas of the skin.[11] This results in dark colouration in the coolest parts of the cat's body, including the extremities and the face, which is cooled by the passage of air through the sinuses. All Siamese kittens, although pure cream or white at birth, develop visible points in the first few months of life in colder parts of their body."

It is also possible to have different genotypes producing the same phenotype, there are many cases when you have two or more genes contributing to a phenotype so you can have different combinations of genotypes for the one phenotype.

Offline bennyboy

Re: Re:
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2013, 09:09:31 AM »
Quote from: "Icarus"
Quote from: "bennyboy"
I'm not a geneticist, but I don't find this result all that surprising.  Given that a phenotype must be represented at the genetic level, and that in a strongly-controlled environment, the same phenotype may provide a statistical advantage every time, especially in simpler organisms.  I'm curious-- when you say "different environments," do you just mean they were isolated from each other, or were they different in composition?

Also, go UBC!  (my alma mater)

Not necessarily, the colour of a siamese cats coat is dependent on the temperature it was raised in. The same genotype produces different phenotypes based solely on the environment.

"The pointed pattern [1] is a form of partial albinism, resulting from a mutation in tyrosinase, an enzyme involved in melanin production. The mutated enzyme is heat-sensitive; it fails to work at normal body temperatures, but becomes active in cooler areas of the skin.[11] This results in dark colouration in the coolest parts of the cat's body, including the extremities and the face, which is cooled by the passage of air through the sinuses. All Siamese kittens, although pure cream or white at birth, develop visible points in the first few months of life in colder parts of their body."

It is also possible to have different genotypes producing the same phenotype, there are many cases when you have two or more genes contributing to a phenotype so you can have different combinations of genotypes for the one phenotype.
For sure.  Another example I've heard is that sexual the development of some gender characteristics is very sensitive to the environment as early as the womb.
Insanity is the only sensible response to the universe.  The sane are just making stuff up.

(No subject)
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2013, 11:25:48 AM »
Quote
Is Evolution Predictable?

Only if you're really really into statistics and markov chains :D
Winner of WitchSabrinas Best Advice Award 2012


We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real
tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. -Plato

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk