Author Topic: reclaiming privacy  (Read 6152 times)

reclaiming privacy
« on: February 09, 2014, 02:20:32 PM »
People nowadays are not grasping what has actually happened to their privacy as they slowly give it up using almost thing or where everywhere they go on the internet. There is defiantly some giving up your privacy so that you can obtain something they want.

If you take the cell phone companies they log your texts for 2+ years and hold your information as theirs but you paid for a service yet they are on the take. Look at the social media sites as they scarf up all your personal data as you volunteer in giving it to them free and they are making money off of it at the same time. Free email accounts, no I think not you are giving them more than you could ever imagine about yourself that you may want to think as private or would like to keep private. I know I could go further in what privacy has been taken from even me as I use certain electronic devices or even buy goods at a store using a debit card as they can track actually who you are by your last four digits of the card and zip code you freely give them.

This is just some of the the ways we are loosing our privacy I just wonder how easy it will be to get it back, where as I see it will never be able to get it back. Our younger generation is not the only one as guilty over it but as I see it they are the ones they target to open the door to what a norm of giving this private information up for free.

The floor is open to why it is a good thing for this free private information given to others as nothing but is really a commodity or even something that can really came back to hurt someone later in life. How would we ever win against giant corporations to change this habit that they have of this invasion of privacy when we give it to them freely? The only thing that is halfed assed private nowadays is medical records that is supposedly protected by the federal government, yet I know my not only state violates these privacy laws everyday but the federal government themselves.

In end I feel that it would really take a lot of money and efforts in reclaiming our privacies and protection of our personal information, if we ever could anymore.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2014, 02:26:54 PM by barbarian »

Offline Plu

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2014, 02:24:10 PM »
The only way to get your privacy back is to not send personal information over a network that involves external parties to resolve.

Read: get off the internet, stop using your credit cards, don't use the phone, and possibly stop using the postal services.

The only reason we've ever had privacy is because there was no feasible way to collect all that data before. They tried with churches and confessions, and whatever else they could, but it just didn't work as well.

Offline AllPurposeAtheist

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2014, 02:28:38 PM »
The government has argued as have companies and many others there is a distinct difference between voluntarily giving information and illegal search and seizure of property. There is a difference between the government or any other entity breaking down your door and taking your stuff and Google storing email messages.
All hail my new signature!

Admit it. You're secretly green with envy.

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2014, 03:09:24 PM »
Quote from: "AllPurposeAtheist"
The government has argued as have companies and many others there is a distinct difference between voluntarily giving information and illegal search and seizure of property. There is a difference between the government or any other entity breaking down your door and taking your stuff and Google storing email messages.

If you noticed in the op i stated very clearly that this is the position of corporations and the government of volunteering the information for free. There is perhaps a blurred line being crossed what was and is now of how business is done and where voluntary isn't always the case anymore and exactly why I also stated reclaiming privacy not giving up privacy. It really is to them as simple as you state, unfortunately we now live in a digital era where this changes dynamics of definitions, or not as you stated.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2014, 03:13:08 PM by barbarian »

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2014, 03:10:48 PM »
Quote from: "Plu"
The only way to get your privacy back is to not send personal information over a network that involves external parties to resolve.

Read: get off the internet, stop using your credit cards, don't use the phone, and possibly stop using the postal services.

The only reason we've ever had privacy is because there was no feasible way to collect all that data before. They tried with churches and confessions, and whatever else they could, but it just didn't work as well.

Is this your final answer?

Online Hydra009

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2014, 03:21:49 PM »
Quote
I know I could go further in what privacy has been taken from even me as I use certain electronic devices or even buy goods at a store using a debit card as they can track actually who you are by your last four digits of the card and zip code you freely give them.
Information that is used for rewards programs and marketing.  Not particularly malicious, imo.

Quote from: "barbarian"
The floor is open to why it is a good thing for this free private information given to others as nothing but is really a commodity or even something that can really came back to hurt someone later in life.
Actually, the whole point of some services (particularly social services and online forums) is to broadcast information on purpose, even a simple birthday post is giving away personal information.  And there are legitimate reasons for handing over personally-identifiable information - Amazon needs to know your address to send you your package, after all.  Plus, a reason why some companies log personal data is that this information can be subpoenaed for criminal proceedings.

Obviously, this information should be protected from abuse (selling to third parties, orwellian snooping, etc) and private correspondence should generally be kept private, but 100% privacy is not realistically possible save for the methods Plu described and Google's Opt Out service.

That said, there are ways of minimizing the flow of private information to the internet (i.e. don't post it) and various privacy tools are freely available.  But even then, giving out personal information is inherently risky.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2014, 03:31:10 PM by Hydra009 »

Offline Plu

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2014, 03:27:00 PM »
Quote
Is this your final answer?

Pretty much. If you want stuff to remain private, don't give it to companies whose business model is to sell all the information you give them to third parties, and don't post it on the internet for everyone to see.

Offline AllPurposeAtheist

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2014, 03:43:45 PM »
You're worried about privacy yet posting on a quite public forum. That seems odd.  #-o
OK, so you haven't posted your social security number or banking information,  but we know now you may be one of those crazy saboteurs of IT infrastructure.  Better be careful what you post.  [-X
All hail my new signature!

Admit it. You're secretly green with envy.

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2014, 04:51:44 PM »
Quote from: "AllPurposeAtheist"
You're worried about privacy yet posting on a quite public forum. That seems odd.  #-o
OK, so you haven't posted your social security number or banking information,  but we know now you may be one of those crazy saboteurs of IT infrastructure.  Better be careful what you post.  [-X

 :rollin: this is pretty much why I had posted this in the informal debate section, it isn't meant to be all serious and shit, yet I think you are pretty much in tune of what I have posted on the subject. I know there really isn't much I or anyone else can undo. I do have a certain level of information that I do supply as far as personal information goes and at least at least i try to limit this.

don't fret none I am not going to hack the website down or steal wikipedias information. I may build a backyard bunker like those crazy ass yokels.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2014, 05:01:11 PM by barbarian »

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2014, 04:54:20 PM »
Quote from: "Plu"
Quote
Is this your final answer?

Pretty much. If you want stuff to remain private, don't give it to companies whose business model is to sell all the information you give them to third parties, and don't post it on the internet for everyone to see.


 I see you got thanks for this post and it is in the informal sections yet people are taking it all serious off the get go. :rollin:

Better protect that facebook account and set those privacy settings higher or it would seem though it would be really more private, lol. Don't over skirt the real topic. You may understand this pretty well but a 13 year old? Again, don't troll on the subject but I will challenge you on a more comprehensive view on it, as again you are smart enough to see what the topic at hand actually is.

May I hang this camera outside your house to keep you nice and safe, How far are you willing to let it ride before you actually have something to say that has some nuts and bolts to it.

Offline Plu

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2014, 05:00:24 PM »
My Facebook only exists because other people are idiots who cannot be reached without it, and contains as little personal information as I can get away with. And even then I realise I'm giving them more than I really want to, it's just that I prefer being able to talk with friends over not giving any data to Facebook  :roll:

Offline AllPurposeAtheist

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2014, 05:38:35 PM »
I'm calling the NSA on you.  Oh wait, they already know you posted this anti establishment rant.. :-$
All hail my new signature!

Admit it. You're secretly green with envy.

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2014, 07:27:54 PM »
Quote from: "AllPurposeAtheist"
I'm calling the NSA on you.  Oh wait, they already know you posted this anti establishment rant.. :-$

As your statement may fit this, I thought you may like this segment from a public television show I watch. I know it may not be youtube but if you have the time to watch the entire segment you may actually like it over a mainstream news channel like FNN or MSNBC.

Deep State

Offline stromboli

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2014, 08:03:14 PM »
The amount of inroads into your privacy has more to do with how much you put yourself out there to be seen as anything. If you buy large quantities of stuff over the internet from dubious sources, participate in radical websites, espouse radical things on the internet, you are going to get noticed. Despite the potential threats like NSA surveillance, there is a limited amount of time/energy versus personnel they can focus on you. If you don't give them anything to focus on, I wouldn't worry too much. I've personally never heard of any teenagers getting arrested for viewing porn or grandpa getting busted for calling Obama the "N" word.

As long as you take precautions like keeping an eye on your bank account, destroying personal information, deleting browser histories, avoiding obvious high interest websites like kiddie porn or other things and don't get really blatant in your actions, you might get noticed, but to seriously come after you they have to have a good reason to do so.

Re: reclaiming privacy
« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2014, 11:45:37 PM »
Quote from: "stromboli"
The amount of inroads into your privacy has more to do with how much you put yourself out there to be seen as anything. If you buy large quantities of stuff over the internet from dubious sources, participate in radical websites, espouse radical things on the internet, you are going to get noticed. Despite the potential threats like NSA surveillance, there is a limited amount of time/energy versus personnel they can focus on you. If you don't give them anything to focus on, I wouldn't worry too much. I've personally never heard of any teenagers getting arrested for viewing porn or grandpa getting busted for calling Obama the "N" word.

As long as you take precautions like keeping an eye on your bank account, destroying personal information, deleting browser histories, avoiding obvious high interest websites like kiddie porn or other things and don't get really blatant in your actions, you might get noticed, but to seriously come after you they have to have a good reason to do so.

Yeah, you really missed the point.  I am not worried about being arrested. Some of the wild shit you mentioned really isn't what I was trying to say and also I wasn't asking for advice like you seem to be giving. This was suppose to be more of an informal debate on what people actually think about the topic. When reading this I would guess you to be part of the baby boomer or older generation. Well, at least you got a post count for it.