Author Topic: Is there sound in space?  (Read 5451 times)

Offline Solitary

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #15 on: August 17, 2013, 11:41:18 AM »
Quote from: "SilentFutility"
Quote from: "Solitary"
Did you read the definition of sound? "(2) definition: energy of vibration sensed in hearing. It doesn't have to be heard to be a sound, it just has to be an energy of vibration that may be heard or not. It's like the sound of one hand clapping.  :shock:  =D>  Solitary

Did you read it?


You are talking about hearing not sound. There are 25 definitions of sound, and you have just supported what I said about words having different meaning and cause problems in logic and philosophy.

From another dictionary:

Definition Sound (2) Mechanical vibration transmitted through an elastic medium , traveling in air at a speed of approximately 1087 ft. (331 m) per second at sea level.

What part of that am I not understanding? Space is an elastic medium. Solitary
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #16 on: August 17, 2013, 06:52:00 PM »
If I have to hear another gun or laser go off in space in a movie or video game I'm going to just kill myself. 2001: A Space Odyssey is the only movie that realized that a what is essentially a vacuum can't carry sound.
[size=150]Circumcision? HIS body, HIS decision.[/size]

[size=150]Your liberty to swing your fist ends just where my nose begins. This is very simple reasoning that is applied to everything, EXCEPT infant circumcision for some stupid fucking reason.[/size]

Offline Colanth

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #17 on: August 17, 2013, 10:08:23 PM »
Quote from: "Solitary"
From another dictionary:

Definition Sound (2) Mechanical vibration transmitted through an elastic medium , traveling in air at a speed of approximately 1087 ft. (331 m) per second at sea level.

What part of that am I not understanding? Space is an elastic medium. Solitary
The part about you cherry-picking.  Did you miss the words "traveling in air at a speed of approximately 1087 ft. (331 m) per second at sea level"?  There's no "or" in there.
Afflicting the comfortable for 70 years.
Science builds skyscrapers, faith flies planes into them.

Offline Solitary

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #18 on: August 18, 2013, 01:00:05 AM »
Quote from: "Colanth"
Quote from: "Solitary"
From another dictionary:

Definition Sound (2) Mechanical vibration transmitted through an elastic medium , traveling in air at a speed of approximately 1087 ft. (331 m) per second at sea level.

What part of that am I not understanding? Space is an elastic medium. Solitary
The part about you cherry-picking.  Did you miss the words "traveling in air at a speed of approximately 1087 ft. (331 m) per second at sea level"?  There's no "or" in there.


I'm not blind and I didn't cherry pick, you did to support your position. Like I said, you are talking about hearing, not sound. Are you saying sound doesn't travel through space or any other elastic medium that it only travels through air? When you are in a fully enclosed house your saying the sound doesn't travel through the walls? Just because sound travels through air at that speed doesn't mean it doesn't travel through other elastic mediums. In fact sound travels through water faster.


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Solitary
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Offline SilentFutility

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #19 on: August 18, 2013, 09:04:36 AM »
Quote from: "Solitary"
Quote from: "SilentFutility"
Quote from: "Solitary"
Did you read the definition of sound? "(2) definition: energy of vibration sensed in hearing. It doesn't have to be heard to be a sound, it just has to be an energy of vibration that may be heard or not. It's like the sound of one hand clapping.  :shock:  =D>  Solitary

Did you read it?


You are talking about hearing not sound. There are 25 definitions of sound, and you have just supported what I said about words having different meaning and cause problems in logic and philosophy.

From another dictionary:

Definition Sound (2) Mechanical vibration transmitted through an elastic medium , traveling in air at a speed of approximately 1087 ft. (331 m) per second at sea level.

What part of that am I not understanding? Space is an elastic medium. Solitary

I am talking about the definition which you posted, along with asking if people had read it, which didn't match up with what you were trying to say, and nothing else...

I don't recall delving into philosophy to support what you said.
 :rollin:

Also:
[youtube:3r8mqlvz]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VC9hbibesY[/youtube:3r8mqlvz]

Offline Solitary

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #20 on: August 18, 2013, 10:11:49 AM »
Quote
I am talking about the definition which you posted, along with asking if people had read it, which didn't match up with what you were trying to say, and nothing else...

I don't recall delving into philosophy to support what you said.
:rollin:


That's your opinion. I said in the first post that the definition of words is a problem in philosophy and logic and you proved me right.  :rollin:  Did you learn anything from the video, or do you think she is wrong too by being a pedantic ass?  :P   Solitary
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Offline SilentFutility

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #21 on: August 18, 2013, 10:27:00 AM »
Quote from: "Solitary"
That's your opinion.
No it isn't. If you can't quote me as saying something, I didn't say it.

Quote from: "Solitary"
I said in the first post
...that I didn't respond to

Quote from: "Solitary"
that the definition of words is a problem in philosophy and logic and you proved me right.  :rollin:
I made no attempt to agree nor disagree with this.
You posted a definition stating that sound has to be heard.
You wrote:
Did you read the definition of sound? "(2) definition: energy of vibration sensed in hearing. It doesn't have to be heard to be a sound, it just has to be an energy of vibration that may be heard or not.
ie. you posted a definition saying that sound had to be heard, then right after it wrote that it doesn't have to be heard to be a sound.

Whether or not you think it boils down defining individual words or not is irrelevant of the fact that you said two contradictory things in one sentence, while at the same time accusing someone else of doing the same thing, which is what I picked up on.

Quote from: "Solitary"
Did you learn anything from the video, or do you think she is wrong too by being a pedantic ass?  :P   Solitary
Which video? The only video I can see in this thread is the one I posted of a HE jokingly doing a one hand clap.

Offline Solitary

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #22 on: August 18, 2013, 11:22:22 AM »
I have no idea why the video wasn't posted. I can't find it again for some reason, but I have this one that doesn't explain as well as the other one.  The other one showed that space is not a complete vacuum so can carry sounds. Does the universe have a soundtrack? Physicist Janna Levin explains the idea behind what she calls, the sounds of space.

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There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #23 on: August 22, 2013, 05:35:26 PM »
There is no such thing as "sound".  What you hear is your brains interpretation of input from your ear, which is stimulated by changes in pressure.



Technically, when a tree falls in the woods and no one is around to hear it, it DOESN'T make a sound.  It does make pressure waves in the surrounding mediums though.
"Death can not be killed." -brq

Offline Solitary

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #24 on: August 22, 2013, 05:48:16 PM »
Quote from: "The Whit"
There is no such thing as "sound".  What you hear is your brains interpretation of input from your ear, which is stimulated by changes in pressure.



Technically, when a tree falls in the woods and no one is around to hear it, it DOESN'T make a sound.  It does make pressure waves in the surrounding mediums though.


Thanks for your response! You are correct, that can be definition of sound, but you are incorrect to think there is no sound when nobody is around to hear it by the scientific definition of sound 2. Sound has more than one definition, and this is why there is a problem here.The modern science dictionary: 2. the energy that produces the stimulus of hearing. Solitary  :-D
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #25 on: August 22, 2013, 06:38:19 PM »
Then the question has different answers, depending on how you define "sound".

The confusion has to do with the fact that we developed the ability to hear before we understood exactly what it was we were hearing.  We identify sounds as "sounds" instead of waves of differing pressure.  But the "sounds" we hear are only impulses in your brain that give you a certain experience (about a great philosophical discussion), and "sound" is the word we give to that experience.  The differing pressure is what causes sound.  If there is no one to hear the differing pressure waves caused by a falling tree then it has not made a sound, since it has not stimulated that part of a brain.

If you're going to equate sound with the differing pressure waves themselves, then anything that produces a pressure wave makes a sound.
"Death can not be killed." -brq

Offline Nonsensei

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #26 on: August 22, 2013, 08:31:44 PM »
Only sci-fi show to acknowledge no sound in space: Babylon 5.
And on the wings of a dream so far beyond reality
All alone in desperation now the time has come
Lost inside you\'ll never find, lost within my own mind
Day after day this misery must go on

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #27 on: August 22, 2013, 08:36:59 PM »
Do we really care?  Only being a lil sarcastic. But seriously, who the fk cares?   Google it.
If you don't chew big red then FUCK YOU!

Offline Solitary

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #28 on: August 22, 2013, 11:51:24 PM »
Quote from: "The Whit"
Then the question has different answers, depending on how you define "sound".

The confusion has to do with the fact that we developed the ability to hear before we understood exactly what it was we were hearing.  We identify sounds as "sounds" instead of waves of differing pressure.  But the "sounds" we hear are only impulses in your brain that give you a certain experience (about a great philosophical discussion), and "sound" is the word we give to that experience.  The differing pressure is what causes sound.  If there is no one to hear the differing pressure waves caused by a falling tree then it has not made a sound, since it has not stimulated that part of a brain.

If you're going to equate sound with the differing pressure waves themselves, then anything that produces a pressure wave makes a sound.


Actually that is true by the number 2 definition. Can you hear a dog whistle? Are you saying that just because you can't hear it and a dog can it isn't making a sound? You are confusing the process of hearing with what a sound is.  {Then the question has different answers, depending on how you define "sound".} YES! Solitary
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Offline Solitary

Re: Is there sound in space?
« Reply #29 on: August 22, 2013, 11:54:20 PM »
Quote from: "Nonsensei"
Only sci-fi show to acknowledge no sound in space: Babylon 5.


How about 2001 Space Odyssey? Solitary
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

 

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