Author Topic: Texas Taliban  (Read 2460 times)

Offline Colanth

Texas Taliban
« on: August 14, 2013, 01:49:07 PM »
If Texas has its way, all science books in the US will include Creationism as science.  There's a petition to the publishers to publish science, not religious pseudoscience, in science texts.

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Afflicting the comfortable for 70 years.
Science builds skyscrapers, faith flies planes into them.

Offline SGOS

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2013, 03:26:08 PM »
Signed it.

Offline stromboli

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2013, 04:02:52 PM »
Quote from: "SGOS"
Signed it.

Ditto.
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2013, 05:47:53 PM »
Signed and shared on Facebook.
???  ??

Offline AllPurposeAtheist

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2013, 07:29:22 PM »
They'll get their way, but the horse left the barn long ago and is still wondering out where no vegetation grows so the horse is now starving and is nothing but skin and bone.
All hail my new signature!

Admit it. You're secretly green with envy.

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2013, 07:55:11 AM »
Signed and shared.
I am currently experiencing life at several WTFs per hour.

Offline Thumpalumpacus

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2013, 11:46:33 AM »
Texas residents, write directly to your board member and let them know that you intend to vote against them if they support the stupidization of textbooks:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

This is the letter I sent to my SBoE representative:

Quote
Sir:

I believe that religion ought to be kept out of public schooling.  I also believe that because religion is faith-based, it is inherently unscientific.  

In accordance with those simple principles, I hope that you reject any attempts to insert any creation theology from any religion into the state science curriculum, and textbooks.

"Creation Science" has been ruled unConstitutional  for teaching in public schools by the United States Supreme Court.  Likewise, "Intelligent Design."  Aside from any skepticism concerning the truth-value of the religious claims, allowing them into the curriculum will result in expensive litigation, financed in part by tax dollars -- including my own. This issue has been hashed out in several cases, most notably McLean v Arkansas and  Kitzmiller v Dover Area School District. Does it not strike you as very wasteful to provoke litigation on a matter which has already been settled?

Furthermore, even if such a policy could withstand court scrutiny -- and surely you can read those tea-leaves as well as I, and see that it cannot-- even if it was upheld, the state would likely then face lawsuits asking why this religion's creation tale is taught, but the litigant's is not taught.

For these reasons, I urge you to reject any insertion of any religious creation myth into the state curriculum, and textbooks.

Your vote on this matter will directly affect my vote if and when you stand for re-election.

Yours sincerely,
<insert witty aphorism here>

Offline Solitary

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2013, 12:11:19 PM »
Quote from: "jansnyder"
Sometimes I think the people down south are not so much Christian but perversely trying to get revenge on the rest of the USA from losing the civil war by forcing religion onto the greater population of America, and that if Texas were to secede and become a Republic, their religious mania would dwindle out, having lost the focus of its vengefulness. They are like idealistic children that, as long as they have an establishment to rebel against, will be rebellious.

Sort of like in the 1960s, there were a lot of hippies that were Christians as a part of a rebellion against the establishment or "system".

And I read a book called "A Maggot", by John Fowles, and he made a point that the Quakers and Puritans and such that rebelled against England were merely enacting a rebellion against the establishment of the UK. And history shows, when the Puritans in New England lost the focus of their rebellion, namely the UK, they became extremely liberal, and their descendants now allow gay marriage in the Unitarian Universalist church.

My sister and her husband were Quakers. They even accept atheist into the church.  =D>  Solitary
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Offline Mathew

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2013, 01:55:27 PM »
Quote from: "Thumpalumpacus"
Texas residents, write directly to your board member and let them know that you intend to vote against them if they support the stupidization of textbooks:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

This is the letter I sent to my SBoE representative:

Quote
Sir:

I believe that religion ought to be kept out of public schooling.  I also believe that because religion is faith-based, it is inherently unscientific.  

In accordance with those simple principles, I hope that you reject any attempts to insert any creation theology from any religion into the state science curriculum, and textbooks.

"Creation Science" has been ruled unConstitutional  for teaching in public schools by the United States Supreme Court.  Likewise, "Intelligent Design."  Aside from any skepticism concerning the truth-value of the religious claims, allowing them into the curriculum will result in expensive litigation, financed in part by tax dollars -- including my own. This issue has been hashed out in several cases, most notably McLean v Arkansas and  Kitzmiller v Dover Area School District. Does it not strike you as very wasteful to provoke litigation on a matter which has already been settled?

Furthermore, even if such a policy could withstand court scrutiny -- and surely you can read those tea-leaves as well as I, and see that it cannot-- even if it was upheld, the state would likely then face lawsuits asking why this religion's creation tale is taught, but the litigant's is not taught.

For these reasons, I urge you to reject any insertion of any religious creation myth into the state curriculum, and textbooks.

Your vote on this matter will directly affect my vote if and when you stand for re-election.

Yours sincerely,

Well-stated. Unfortunately, I doubt they'll listen. The only way to deal with these people is to vote them out, but as if that's going to happen in this red-as-a-baboon's-ass state.

Offline Colanth

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2013, 05:09:57 PM »
Quote from: "jansnyder"
Sometimes I think the people down south are not so much Christian but perversely trying to get revenge on the rest of the USA from losing the civil war by forcing religion onto the greater population of America
Having lived in the south, you should know better.  Most of these people actually believe the crap (as much as someone with that much lack of intelligence can be said to believe anything).
Afflicting the comfortable for 70 years.
Science builds skyscrapers, faith flies planes into them.

Offline Thumpalumpacus

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2013, 02:18:12 AM »
Quote from: "Mathew"
Well-stated. Unfortunately, I doubt they'll listen. The only way to deal with these people is to vote them out, but as if that's going to happen in this red-as-a-baboon's-ass state.

Well, you can vote, or not.  

Not voting doesn't seem to be a promising solution.
<insert witty aphorism here>

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2013, 06:17:23 AM »
No offense but I am not familiar with this company, or the url. I am very picky about who I give my personal info to.
"We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus -- and nonbelievers." Obama
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2013, 06:19:16 AM »
Quote from: "Thumpalumpacus"
Texas residents, write directly to your board member and let them know that you intend to vote against them if they support the stupidization of textbooks:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

This is the letter I sent to my SBoE representative:

Quote
Sir:

I believe that religion ought to be kept out of public schooling.  I also believe that because religion is faith-based, it is inherently unscientific.  

In accordance with those simple principles, I hope that you reject any attempts to insert any creation theology from any religion into the state science curriculum, and textbooks.

"Creation Science" has been ruled unConstitutional  for teaching in public schools by the United States Supreme Court.  Likewise, "Intelligent Design."  Aside from any skepticism concerning the truth-value of the religious claims, allowing them into the curriculum will result in expensive litigation, financed in part by tax dollars -- including my own. This issue has been hashed out in several cases, most notably McLean v Arkansas and  Kitzmiller v Dover Area School District. Does it not strike you as very wasteful to provoke litigation on a matter which has already been settled?

Furthermore, even if such a policy could withstand court scrutiny -- and surely you can read those tea-leaves as well as I, and see that it cannot-- even if it was upheld, the state would likely then face lawsuits asking why this religion's creation tale is taught, but the litigant's is not taught.

For these reasons, I urge you to reject any insertion of any religious creation myth into the state curriculum, and textbooks.

Your vote on this matter will directly affect my vote if and when you stand for re-election.

Yours sincerely,

Well said with precedence to back it up.
"We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus -- and nonbelievers." Obama
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Offline Solitary

Re: Texas Taliban
« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2013, 11:11:18 AM »
Quote from: "Brian37"
No offense but I am not familiar with this company, or the url. I am very picky about who I give my personal info to.




You and me both. Solitary
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk