Author Topic: Cancel Culture: a case study  (Read 1718 times)

Cancel Culture: a case study
« on: December 24, 2020, 08:54:41 AM »
I find the the phenomenon of cancel culture on social media interesting. The push towards egalitarianism is such a worthy cause, however there is collateral damage for sure as people navigate the slippery slopes. Curious to see what you think of this situation where a talented singer/songwriter releases a song and there are attempts at cancelling her because a year ago she covered a song by a black artist and kept the n-word in the lyrics.
She commented.....
also I’m sorry for saying the n word really didn’t want to offend anyone
I wasn’t aware of the fact that it would be so offensive, I just sang the lyrics



In her new video at first so many comments were cancels..
-girl we ain’t forget
-wheres the n word in this one😻?
-TAKE THE DAMN MOONLIGHT COVER DOWN
However, many have come to her rescue.

« Last Edit: December 24, 2020, 09:04:27 AM by Cassia »

Offline SGOS

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2020, 11:10:02 AM »
I had to google cancel culture, and I'm not getting what this all about.  These videos didn't help either.   I take it she made a social error by mistake or something that I didn't catch, I listened to half of the first, but I listened to all of the second.

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2020, 11:41:29 AM »
I had to google cancel culture, and I'm not getting what this all about.  These videos didn't help either.   I take it she made a social error by mistake or something that I didn't catch, I listened to half of the first, but I listened to all of the second.

I'm not sure what exactly "cancel culture" entails either. In this case, it seems some people were offended by her use of the n-word, and publicly criticized her for it. She obviously wasn't kicked off YouTube. Am I missing something?

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2020, 11:48:59 AM »
I'm not sure what exactly "cancel culture" entails either. In this case, it seems some people were offended by her use of the n-word, and publicly criticized her for it. She obviously wasn't kicked off YouTube. Am I missing something?
Yeah, if you go to the YT app and read the comments, I found them interesting and it raised questions in my mind. Is it ethical for a white person to quote the n-word from a black person's lyrics? Is there artistic license for this? Cancel culture (via social media) has been called out by conservatives as "virtue signaling", as in that liberals are just trying to make themselves seem ultra ethical without actually doing anything. Does this stuff drive a bunch of moderates to the right? I do wonder about that.

Offline Baruch

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2020, 12:24:16 PM »
Part of SJW culture, part of 21st century Marxism.  People shouldn't talk, they should kill each other ;-)
Ha’át’íísh baa naniná?
Azee’ ła’ish nanídį́į́h?
Táadoo ánít’iní.
What are you doing?
Are you taking any medications?
Don't do that.

Offline SGOS

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2020, 12:48:23 PM »
Is it ethical for a white person to quote the n-word from a black person's lyrics?
I don't know.  Is it ethical for a black person to use the n-word?  I see it in Hollywood flims all the time.

Quote
Is there artistic license for this?
It would probably depend on some context.

Quote
Cancel culture (via social media) has been called out by conservatives as "virtue signaling",
Other people's virtues seem to be a problem for conservatives.  This why we have Prozac.

Offline Draconic Aiur

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2020, 03:23:50 PM »
 People play the racist card unless it's by the own "race".



Edit:
However when one "race" uses the same word repetitively in the whole culture like in songs it becomes standard in all they do regardless of where the word came from. But if someone from a different race uses it even just quoting, that "race" goes batshit crazy.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2020, 03:33:28 PM by Draconic Aiur »

Offline aitm

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2020, 03:31:39 PM »
Cancel culture is a biggie on social media’s....for the rest of the country/world.....it’s a hyped up fad that they know nothing, care nothing about.
A humans desire to live is exceeded only by their willingness to die for another. Even god cannot equal this magnificent sacrifice. No god has the right to judge them.-first tenant of the Panotheust

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #8 on: December 24, 2020, 05:12:38 PM »
A long time ago at a dinner party I said something stupid. Something racist. Almost before my words left my mouth I knew I had fucked up and was sorry for being such an ass. I searched their faces to learn the extent of the damage. To my surprise it was OK. They knew me well and knew it was just a beer too much and a very bad day. Some shitty impulsive ideas that I absorbed from racist friends in my youth. I was so relieved. There were no cameras, no phones and no FB to make my crime go viral. No worry of canceling my famous future, LOL.  I never forgot that crappy feeling.

Offline Baruch

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #9 on: December 24, 2020, 05:24:46 PM »
You can treat all people like shit, some people like shit, or one person like shit.  Depends on if you are married ;-)

My daughter and I had an intelligent conversation about this today.  Identity politics.  Bigots of a feather flock together.  White haters join up ... Black haters join up and a thousand other dividing lines.  There will always be differences in social status.  There will always be bigotry over a thousand things, most of them stupid.  The reality is we are psychological and social.  This is the cause of everything.

One can be descriptive, but not proscriptive.  Sociologists are supposed to be descriptive, not social advocates.  But that isn't how sociology departments started on college campuses in the late 19th century.  It was part of the early Progressive movement, that peaked around 1920 with women's vote and Prohibition.  Everything in the last 100 years happened because of the unforeseen consequences from then.  Some good some bad.

So some Black people can be more White than some White people, and vice versa.  This basically proves the complete BS that activist politics is.  Whoever you are related to, work with, are friends with, encounter with ... be kind to them.  Otherwise, labels aside, you are part of the problem, not a part of the solution.
Ha’át’íísh baa naniná?
Azee’ ła’ish nanídį́į́h?
Táadoo ánít’iní.
What are you doing?
Are you taking any medications?
Don't do that.

Offline Baruch

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2020, 08:06:11 AM »
"The New York Times helps a vindictive teen named Jimmy Galligan get a girl named Mimi Groves CANCELED and kicked out of college for an Instagram video she made when she was 15." ... on the other hand, it is OK to burn, loot and murder today's people, nobody will miss the "total depravity".
Ha’át’íísh baa naniná?
Azee’ ła’ish nanídį́į́h?
Táadoo ánít’iní.
What are you doing?
Are you taking any medications?
Don't do that.

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2020, 08:40:43 AM »
I don't know if this qualifies as "cancel culture" but I thought it was interesting.

A Cheerleader’s Vulgar Message Prompts a First Amendment Showdown

WASHINGTON — It was a Saturday in the spring of 2017, and a ninth-grade student in Pennsylvania was having a bad day. She had just learned that she had failed to make the varsity cheerleading squad and would remain on junior varsity.

The student expressed her frustration on social media, sending a message on Snapchat to about 250 friends. The message included an image of the student and a friend with their middle fingers raised, along with text expressing a similar sentiment. Using a curse word four times, the student expressed her dissatisfaction with “school,” “softball,” “cheer” and “everything.”

Though Snapchat messages are ephemeral by design, another student took a screenshot of this one and showed it to her mother, a coach. The school suspended the student from cheerleading for a year, saying the punishment was needed to “avoid chaos” and maintain a “teamlike environment.”

The student sued the school district, winning a sweeping victory in the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, in Philadelphia. The court said the First Amendment did not allow public schools to punish students for speech outside school grounds.

Next month, at its first private conference after the holiday break, the Supreme Court will consider whether to hear the case, Mahanoy Area School District v. B.L., No. 20-255. The Third Circuit’s ruling is in tension with decisions from several other courts, and such splits often invite Supreme Court review.

In urging the justices to hear the case, the school district said administrators around the nation needed a definitive ruling from the Supreme Court on their power to discipline students for what they say away from school. “The question presented recurs constantly and has become even more urgent as Covid-19 has forced schools to operate online,” a brief for the school district said. “Only this court can resolve this threshold First Amendment question bedeviling the nation’s nearly 100,000 public schools.”

Justin Driver, a law professor at Yale and the author of “The Schoolhouse Gate: Public Education, the Supreme Court and the Battle for the American Mind,” agreed with the school district, to a point.

“It is difficult to exaggerate the stakes of this constitutional question,” he said. But he added that schools had no business telling students what they could say when they were not in school.

“In the modern era, a tremendous percentage of minors’ speech occurs off campus but online,” he said. “Judicial decisions that permit schools to regulate off-campus speech that criticizes public schools are antithetical to the First Amendment. Such decisions empower schools to reach into any student’s home and declare critical statements verboten, something that should deeply alarm all Americans.” ...

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2020, 08:50:17 AM »
"The New York Times helps a vindictive teen named Jimmy Galligan get a girl named Mimi Groves CANCELED and kicked out of college for an Instagram video she made when she was 15." ... on the other hand, it is OK to burn, loot and murder today's people, nobody will miss the "total depravity".

I have been thinking about cases like this. If I examine my own family a few members of the previous generation were outwardly racist against all nonwhites. Slurs were an everyday thing. Blaming immigrants, Blacks, and Hispanics for their lack of success. Others, usually female aunts would give them some grief about their shitty attitudes. My generation is inwardly racist. The price to pay for slurs becoming high. The youngest generation of the family is virtually race-blind. I think this may be partly because they didn't have to hear and learn slurs all day. This is progress.

African Americans in order to blunt the impact, have incorporated a modified version of the n-word into common usage. This is genius. However now we have a clueless young girl who may have been oblivious to this entire tragedy. What happened to her is probably not fair. Is it some sort of justification for the racism that continues? No way.

Offline Baruch

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2020, 09:07:06 AM »
To stop racism, kill all the Whites ;-)

Cyber-bullying isn't new.  What is new is political parties and governments using cyber-bullying as a weapon against the People.  Don't worry about college educated people, they aren't human.  Tastes like chicken ;-))
Ha’át’íísh baa naniná?
Azee’ ła’ish nanídį́į́h?
Táadoo ánít’iní.
What are you doing?
Are you taking any medications?
Don't do that.

Re: Cancel Culture: a case study
« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2020, 09:21:37 AM »
Do Americans have a right to be racist? Do Americans have a right to say hateful things about individuals or groups of people? Should what people say on their own time allow employers and schools to fire them? There doesn't appear to be a consensus. The temptation is to censor or punish people who say disagreeable or hurtful things but, as someone who admittedly has a history of saying disagreeable things, I prefer to allow people as much latitude as possible. The singer in question should use whatever language she wants, particularly since music is an artistic expression, and listeners should be able to criticize her for it. I would take issue if YouTube kicked her off the platform.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2020, 09:29:15 AM by GSOgymrat »