Author Topic: Space-time is the new ether  (Read 3716 times)

Re: Space-time is the new ether
« Reply #15 on: July 01, 2013, 02:24:14 PM »
Quote from: "Solitary"
Quote from: "Gawdzilla Sama"
Can you refer us to the TV show you're citing?


Is this directed toward me? I never cited any TV show.  :-?  Solitary
Odd, it certainly sounds like it.
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers

Offline Solitary

Re: Space-time is the new ether
« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2013, 02:35:52 PM »
:evil:
« Last Edit: July 11, 2013, 02:24:37 AM by Solitary »
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Re: Space-time is the new ether
« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2013, 03:10:07 PM »
I keep hearing Morgan Freeman.
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers

Offline Solitary

Re: Space-time is the new ether
« Reply #18 on: July 01, 2013, 10:59:47 PM »
:evil:
« Last Edit: July 11, 2013, 02:25:00 AM by Solitary »
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Re: Space-time is the new ether
« Reply #19 on: July 01, 2013, 11:24:44 PM »
Well no. Lorentz was by no means stupid (he was quite the physicist), he was just wrong.
Which means that to me the offer of certainty, the offer of complete security, the offer of an impermeable faith that can\'t give way, is the offer of something not worth having.
[...]
Take the risk of thinking for yourself. Much more happiness, truth, beauty & wisdom, will come to you that way.
-Christopher Hitchens

Offline Hakurei Reimu

Re: Space-time is the new ether
« Reply #20 on: July 02, 2013, 11:45:41 PM »
Quote from: "Solitary"
Did you even read what I wrote? The aluminiferous aether theory was about space, the new ether theory is about space-time.
Which means that they really bear no real resemblance to each other at all.

Quote from: "Solitary"
You are the one comparing apples to bandicoots.
Stop projecting.

Quote from: "Solitary"
Just because teachers don't want to fry students minds by saying light waves in space-time doesn't mean it doesn't.
Light waves are in space-time in the same sense that everything else is in space-time. Your statement has no content.

Quote from: "Solitary"
It seems though that the electromagnetic field (light) consists of wave-like distortions of the new ether (space-time.) Solitary
Only for people like you. Undulating distortions of space-time would be gravity waves. It is not even possible for space-time to be the wave medium of photons, because the equations say that, should they exist, the quantum force carriers of such waves would be spin 2, whereas photons are strictly spin 1, if the disparage of interaction strength wasn't enough to clinch it.
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Offline Solitary

Re: Space-time is the new ether
« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2013, 05:09:52 PM »
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Re: Space-time is the new ether
« Reply #22 on: July 12, 2013, 05:48:57 PM »
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Re: Space-time is the new ether
« Reply #23 on: July 12, 2013, 06:49:48 PM »
Quote from: "Solitary"
It is conventional to reverse the sign of the right hand sign, making it (*) s2 = (ct)2 - x2 - y2 - z2. This is also a geometric invariant, and the same form of the magnitude will be applicable to the derivative of the vector.

Now, the definition of ? is (1 - (v/c)2)-1/2 = c(c2 - v2)-1/2, so ?2 = c2(c2 - v2)-1, v being the speed of the object being observed.

So, finally, we can get an expression for the magnitude of the derivative of the spacetime vector, denoted by s:

(**)

The bold part and the labels (*), (**), (***) is of my doing.

Sorry, but that result (***) is wrong.

If

(*) s[sup:1bdyvdq8]2[/sup:1bdyvdq8] = (ct)[sup:1bdyvdq8]2[/sup:1bdyvdq8] - x[sup:1bdyvdq8]2[/sup:1bdyvdq8] - y[sup:1bdyvdq8]2[/sup:1bdyvdq8] - z[sup:1bdyvdq8]2[/sup:1bdyvdq8].

Then taking the derivative wrt time on both sides:

Right-hand side = 2sds/dt

Left-hand side = 2ct - 2x(dx/dt) - 2y(dy/dt) - 2z(dz/dt).

Equating these two, and you can eliminate the 2 on both sides, you get,

s(ds/dt) = ct - x(dx/dt) - y(dy/dt) - z(dz/dt), not your equation which I labelled by (**)

From this, you don't get (***) s[sup:1bdyvdq8]2[/sup:1bdyvdq8] = c[sup:1bdyvdq8]2[/sup:1bdyvdq8]
“Religion was invented when the first con man met the first fool.” - Mark Twain

 

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