Author Topic: What book should I read next?  (Read 280 times)

What book should I read next?
« on: February 17, 2020, 09:23:14 PM »
I have completed reading "The God Delusion" and "God is Not Great." While I enjoyed them both, they don't do a very good job representing Catholicism or the Bible. For example Hitchens mentions all four gospels being based off of Q. Only 2 (Matthew and Luke) likely were. 

What should I read next? Are any of the modern atheist writers more scholarly?  Again, I like Hitchens and Dawkins for what they do, but I'm looking for something that I don't have to mentally correct as I'm reading it. Perhaps a book that addresses the Bible and Jesus more directly...
"Who do I think I am? Good question, really, and I'll answer like this: I've seen too much to be Robin, but I'm still too optimistic to be Batman. I'm Nightwing."

Offline Draconic Aiur

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2020, 09:49:00 PM »
I haven't read any. When it comes to non fiction I read mostly historical texts and books or Science articles.

Online Sal1981

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2020, 03:25:30 AM »
I've read The God Delusion as well.

Although I've not read it, I've heard good things about Misquoting Jesus by Prof. Bart D. Ehrman
"The first principle is that you must not fool yourself - and you are the easiest person to fool" --- Richard P. Feynman

Offline aitm

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2020, 08:49:53 AM »
IF it is your belief that the best way to know the truth is to discredit a fictional story, you will be disappointed. Not because it isn't easy, but because it is fantasy and relies heavily on being manipulative by the "believers", thus any argument will fall short as they simply make up new rules and excuses.

I suggest you continue to study not on books based on past fictional beliefs but on books dedicated to exploring the real reasons things are.

When a believer argues that X exists because of god and is mentioned in the babble, instead of partaking in the losing proposition of arguing what the babble actually says, you can simply point out that X exists due to -insert real science.
A humans desire to live is exceeded only by their willingness to die for another. Even god cannot equal this magnificent sacrifice. No god has the right to judge them.-first tenant of the Panotheust

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2020, 09:16:44 AM »
I have completed reading "The God Delusion" and "God is Not Great." While I enjoyed them both, they don't do a very good job representing Catholicism or the Bible. For example Hitchens mentions all four gospels being based off of Q. Only 2 (Matthew and Luke) likely were. 

What should I read next? Are any of the modern atheist writers more scholarly?  Again, I like Hitchens and Dawkins for what they do, but I'm looking for something that I don't have to mentally correct as I'm reading it. Perhaps a book that addresses the Bible and Jesus more directly...
I'd highly recommend Richard Carrier's last book--On the Historicity of Jesus: Why We Might Have Reason for Doubt.  It is a huge book, highly researched and footnoted and well written. 
Robert M. Price, former Baptist minister and prof. at a seminary, has numerous books, the latest dealing with the historicity of Jesus--and numerous other topics, would appeal to you considering he was a christian teacher and now writes about losing that belief system.
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Offline Baruch

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2020, 12:30:05 PM »
Yes, one can explore a new POV by debunking where you came from, or illuminating where you are going to.

Do you need more science?  So many choices.  Older science books are less value, because science is dynamic.

Do you need more debunking?  Many experts here can share (unless you really want a big book).

Unless you want the purely secular psychology or philosophical justification for atheism as a personal choice or epistemology.

What?  You still read?  Aren't you chipped yet? (joke).
Ha’át’íísh baa naniná?
Azee’ ła’ish nanídį́į́h?
Táadoo ánít’iní.
What are you doing?
Are you taking any medications?
Don't to that.

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2020, 01:42:07 PM »
One of my favorites was The Christian Delusion, by multiple authors.

I don't know if this is what you're seeking, but it's worth a close look, I think.
God Not Found
"There is a sucker born-again every minute." - C. Spellman

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2020, 02:01:25 PM »
Here's a list of good books, most of which I've read and so can recommend:


http://nullgod.com/index.php/topic,29.0.html
God Not Found
"There is a sucker born-again every minute." - C. Spellman

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2020, 09:28:55 PM »
IF it is your belief that the best way to know the truth is to discredit a fictional story, you will be disappointed. Not because it isn't easy, but because it is fantasy and relies heavily on being manipulative by the "believers", thus any argument will fall short as they simply make up new rules and excuses.

I suggest you continue to study not on books based on past fictional beliefs but on books dedicated to exploring the real reasons things are.

When a believer argues that X exists because of god and is mentioned in the babble, instead of partaking in the losing proposition of arguing what the babble actually says, you can simply point out that X exists due to -insert real science.

Thanks for the advice. I am a former Catholic not a Scripture Alone fundamentalist. So for me faith wasn't generally trying to fill in the gaps. I was taught the Big Bang and evolution in Catholic elementary. Science has always been truth to me. I was just one of those who would say science and religion deal with two different but non-conflicting truths.

If one has lived with a reconciliation between faith and science, such as in my case, it is the letting go of faith that is the challenge. Mentally I'm there. But not yet emotionally.
"Who do I think I am? Good question, really, and I'll answer like this: I've seen too much to be Robin, but I'm still too optimistic to be Batman. I'm Nightwing."

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2020, 09:34:55 PM »
Yes, one can explore a new POV by debunking where you came from, or illuminating where you are going to.

Do you need more science?  So many choices.  Older science books are less value, because science is dynamic.

Do you need more debunking?  Many experts here can share (unless you really want a big book).

Unless you want the purely secular psychology or philosophical justification for atheism as a personal choice or epistemology.

What?  You still read?  Aren't you chipped yet? (joke).

Great question. I've made the mental change. It was a scales from the eyes moment for me. But I have a lifetime of emotional attachment. I guess I'm looking for something to help me break that emotional attachment. Probably something debunking Christianity from a historical perspective. That may sound counter intuitive but I think it will help me.
"Who do I think I am? Good question, really, and I'll answer like this: I've seen too much to be Robin, but I'm still too optimistic to be Batman. I'm Nightwing."

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2020, 09:35:40 PM »
Here's a list of good books, most of which I've read and so can recommend:


http://nullgod.com/index.php/topic,29.0.html

Awesome. Thank you.
"Who do I think I am? Good question, really, and I'll answer like this: I've seen too much to be Robin, but I'm still too optimistic to be Batman. I'm Nightwing."

Offline Baruch

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2020, 10:13:49 PM »
Great question. I've made the mental change. It was a scales from the eyes moment for me. But I have a lifetime of emotional attachment. I guess I'm looking for something to help me break that emotional attachment. Probably something debunking Christianity from a historical perspective. That may sound counter intuitive but I think it will help me.

Christianity is a part of history, even if the scripture is fictional, and the doctrine is ideological.  If those facts aren't sufficient, then maybe it isn't an epistemology problem.  Not IQ but EQ.  Look up "emotional quotient" and try to face this psychologically.  Also give yourself time.  Do you need to go thru the 5 stages of grief, since you are making a jarring large personal change?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_intelligence

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kübler-Ross_model
Ha’át’íísh baa naniná?
Azee’ ła’ish nanídį́į́h?
Táadoo ánít’iní.
What are you doing?
Are you taking any medications?
Don't to that.

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2020, 09:20:08 PM »
Christianity is a part of history, even if the scripture is fictional, and the doctrine is ideological.  If those facts aren't sufficient, then maybe it isn't an epistemology problem.  Not IQ but EQ.  Look up "emotional quotient" and try to face this psychologically.  Also give yourself time.  Do you need to go thru the 5 stages of grief, since you are making a jarring large personal change?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_intelligence

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kübler-Ross_model

I'm sure you're right. My faith was my identity. I must be grieving.
"Who do I think I am? Good question, really, and I'll answer like this: I've seen too much to be Robin, but I'm still too optimistic to be Batman. I'm Nightwing."

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2020, 10:40:55 PM »
I'm sure you're right. My faith was my identity. I must be grieving.
Sure--grieving and celebrating at the same time.  Yeah, that can happen.  When part of us dies (emotional, physical, intellectual--etc) we grieve.  And we can celebrate what is taking that parts place. 
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Re: What book should I read next?
« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2020, 01:47:51 PM »
I think we should celebrate who we are becoming, not mourn who we once were.
God Not Found
"There is a sucker born-again every minute." - C. Spellman