Author Topic: Is it natural?  (Read 351 times)

Offline SGOS

Re: Is it natural?
« Reply #30 on: February 09, 2020, 10:10:10 PM »
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There are Christians who really do teach this and interpret the bible this way. But they also practice a more loving and open expression of Christianity (e.g. Richard Rohr) than is historical. It's something I was thinking about today. The more progressive the expression the further it is from traditional Christianity. It is then deemed heretical by traditional / conservative Christians. It's a strange irony. To be what Christianity claims to be, you have to be less Christian.
I've met 4 Quakers in my life, which is hardly a representative sample, but I would describe those four as very decent people.  I moved to a different state in the Bible Belt 10 years ago, and as it turns out, my two best friends here are Christian fundamentalists, and they are both giving and forgiving and I'm thrilled to have them in my life.  Religion is not a part of our friendship and we respect each other a great deal.  Discussions about our personal beliefs are seldom and amazingly brief.

Re: Is it natural?
« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2020, 11:05:43 PM »
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When I gave up trying to believe in a god, it was like overturning a garbage can.  Most of the intellectually absurd ideas came out in a big heap and were easily swept away, but much of the irrational emotional stuff imprinted in my early childhood were like maggots sticking to the insides of the can and still had to dry up and fall off.  It wasn't a big project, and I don't remember working hard to clean up the mess.  Left alone, it seemed to decompose and go away on its own. [

Excellent analogy.
"Who do I think I am? Good question, really, and I'll answer like this: I've seen too much to be Robin, but I'm still too optimistic to be Batman. I'm Nightwing."

Re: Is it natural?
« Reply #32 on: February 10, 2020, 09:08:52 AM »
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There are Christians who really do teach this and interpret the bible this way. But they also practice a more loving and open expression of Christianity (e.g. Richard Rohr) than is historical. It's something I was thinking about today. The more progressive the expression the further it is from traditional Christianity. It is then deemed heretical by traditional / conservative Christians. It's a strange irony. To be what Christianity claims to be, you have to be less Christian.
From what I've seen and from what I've learned from study, the real dishonest/evil part of any religion is its hierarchy.  The priesthood has a real vested interest in maintaining the status quo--that's how they get money and power, and once they have both money and power their main interest turns into growing both the money and the power.  The people who make up those religions are, for the most part, just people.  They, as a rule, are kind and caring people.  I've been in several Southern churches, and a Methodist and Baptist church in the West, as well as a very active member of Unity from about a decade.  I met a bunch of good people (in spite of their religious beliefs) and enjoyed that part of being a member. 
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Offline Baruch

Re: Is it natural?
« Reply #33 on: February 10, 2020, 12:01:17 PM »
I see Catholicism as being a strongly cultural/ethnic thing, something not part of my experience, but not as alien as say ... Japanese Buddhism.
Zampa xiquihto.  Amo nimitzcuamachilia.
Say it again.  I don't understand you.

 

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