Author Topic: Bear On the Trail  (Read 818 times)

Online Munch

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2019, 07:59:24 AM »
Always being an emergency bat-cape with you, wear that and blow out the wings and scream at it to look bigger and more intimidating
'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' - George Carlin

Offline drunkenshoe

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2019, 09:27:15 AM »
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The guy in the store was more obvious about his position, but neither of us wanted to pursue a debate.  I did open a potential crack when I said I didn't want to piss off the bears, and he let it go with a, "Well that can happen if you miss."  A lot of guys would take it to the next level so they could defend whatever Gun Amendment it is in the constitution.  But that has nothing to do with what happened that day.  I just wanted the bear to leave me alone.

Which should be the default position. Of course you know about these people and their culture more than I do and you see this particular exchange as harmless considering what could have passed more in the conversation. I get it. The point that annoys me to no end is the general trigger happy attitude and the obscene appetite for killing and goading for it. Acting as if there is no other action to be taken. What he is saying is practically goading someone -someone they have no idea of- to use a deadly firearm to kill an animal for almost nothing when he is looking for a better, more reasonable solution. We have the same culture over here, it is just yours is official and defined by a law.

Anyone who lives with guns, sells guns should/would be the opposite of this. Because they are supposed to know the psychology of carrying a deadly weapon. There is a huge responsibility in selling such a product, the way they market and sell it and what they make people feel about it. If they are not, something is seriously wrong. This is not normal in any way. Can these people spend any time away from any fire arms, shooting and killing something just the for the heck of it? I doubt it. It's like drugs in a way. How do you act around someone like that? There isn't a very long step away from that unhealthy relationship with fire arms to shooting oneself when drunk and depressed or shooting people around when felt betrayed, angry or frustrated.

 
'the wise man does not seek enlightenment, he waits for it. so while ı was waiting, it occurred to me that seeking perplexity might be more fun.’ - lu-tze

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #17 on: September 29, 2019, 09:48:18 AM »
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LOL  In 1954, I was eleven, and my family took their first trip out west, and like everyone else that goes west, we stopped at Yellowstone.  Back then, bears roamed freely through the camp grounds.  The Park Administration had just installed new bear proof garbage facilities that were buried in the ground like missile silos. They had a heavy cast iron hinged lid that required using both hands each requiring unique and simultaneous actions to open the lid.  As an eleven year old it was easy to look at it and figure out what you needed to do, and of course they were completely useless for keeping the bears out of the garbage.  They would just walk up to them and use their paws as required to pop the lids right up.

My little sister and I were waiting out of range with a sack full of garbage, while a bear was busy scattering garbage all over the place.  When he was done he headed off for the next garbage silo, so my sister and I walked up to add our garbage to the dumpster thing.  When the bear heard us he came running back as fast as he could, and my sister and I went screaming back to our campsite.  Of course the bear didn't care about us.  He just wanted to see what we put in the garbage hole.

You put the garbage where you were supposed to, and the bears would take it out.  It was that simple, except it was probably embarrassing for the Park Administration that created the new "bear proof" system.
That was a few years after our trip.  I do remember seeing (and hearing) bears everywhere; on the roads with people stopped and feeding the bears--which drove the rangers nuts!  And in the campgrounds at night and almost always near the garbage (or bear feeding spots) cans.  But I still remember Yellowstone as being an amazing place, even to a very young myself!
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Offline SGOS

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #18 on: September 29, 2019, 11:01:44 AM »
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Of course you know about these people and their culture more than I do
I think you understand it well, and I'm kind of surprised you are so aware of it.  But not all gun lovers are the same.  Some are quite thoughtful and responsible, in spite of what seems to be kind of an odd passion to me.  Others, equate gun ownership with being macho, and they tend to be scary, which is the image I think they are trying to project.  And that element is large, or at least loud.

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and you see this particular exchange as harmless considering what could have passed more in the conversation.
I think most such exchanges are more pointless than harmless, and I tend to be bored by the attitude.  Not to say none of these people are dangerous.  Clearly many of them are very dangerous.  But nothing will be done about it.  I could live in worse places or better places.  But I'm not going to leave at this point in my life.  So I try not to provoke these people because it's not productive.


Offline SGOS

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #19 on: September 29, 2019, 11:08:14 AM »
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That was a few years after our trip.  I do remember seeing (and hearing) bears everywhere; on the roads with people stopped and feeding the bears--which drove the rangers nuts!  And in the campgrounds at night and almost always near the garbage (or bear feeding spots) cans.  But I still remember Yellowstone as being an amazing place, even to a very young myself!
Yellowstone is amazing, but much too crowded for me to enjoy, at least in the summer.  Late fall and winter may be OK, but I've never been there at that time.

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #20 on: September 29, 2019, 11:21:04 AM »
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Yellowstone is amazing, but much too crowded for me to enjoy, at least in the summer.  Late fall and winter may be OK, but I've never been there at that time.
I live 80 mi. from Yosemite now, and it is the same.  We pick carefully the time we go for a visit.  We usually pick early spring or in mid/late Oct.  It is still full of people but we can at least get around fairly easy.  Yellowstone was not all that crowded in the early 50's--I can only imagine what it's like now.  Too many people makes trips to these places an ordeal rather than a pleasant experience.  Sort of like going to a baseball park to watch a game--getting there, finding your seat, trying to leave; all a real hassle.  I'll watch on TV, thank you.  So, I'll visit Yellowstone via youtube now; not go there.
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Offline SGOS

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #21 on: September 29, 2019, 03:51:54 PM »
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I live 80 mi. from Yosemite now,
I made an irrelevant post thinking Yosemite was Yellowstone.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2019, 03:54:21 PM by SGOS »

Offline SGOS

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #22 on: September 29, 2019, 04:03:17 PM »
I was back on the same trail again around eightish this morning.  I hiked 3.4 miles and saw bear sign without the bears.  It was pleasant, and I felt secure.

Offline SGOS

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #23 on: September 30, 2019, 08:21:30 AM »
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Always being an emergency bat-cape with you, wear that and blow out the wings and scream at it to look bigger and more intimidating
In regards to blowing out the bat wings, I remember wondering if I should reach way over my head to look bigger, but I can't remember if I did.  It would be my natural reaction.

But check this out from the National Park Service:
Quote
There are two types of charges—bluff charges and aggressive charges.

Bluff charges are more common.
 Bluff charges are meant to scare or intimidate. When a bear bluff charges, it will have its head and ears up and forward. The bear will puff itself up to look bigger. It will bound on its front paws toward you (moving in big leaps), but then stop short or veer off to one side. Often bears retreat after a bluff charge, or they may vocalize loudly.

If you can see a bluff charge is about to happen, slowly back away while waving your arms above your head, and speak to the bear in a calm voice. When the bear charges you, hold your ground and stay calm. After the bear charges, slowly retreat while keeping an eye on the bear. Let the bear know that you’re a human, and that you aren’t a threat. Continue to speak to the bear in a calm voice and make it clear that you are a human.

Do NOT run during a bluff charge, it may trigger the bear to attack. Stand your ground.

 

Offline Mr.Obvious

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Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #24 on: October 01, 2019, 11:54:02 AM »
Regards to OP
Bear mace is for pussies?

Fuck man, I'm not sure I'd even be comfortable with a can of that stuff in my house.
"If we have to go down, we go down together!"
- Your mum, requesting 69 last night.

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Offline Baruch

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #25 on: October 01, 2019, 12:03:21 PM »
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Regards to OP
Bear mace is for pussies?

Fuck man, I'm not sure I'd even be comfortable with a can of that stuff in my house.

I expect you have to go to the Black Forest to find any dangerous animals.  I have coyotes at the edge of my town, raptors flying overhead, and puma less than 20 miles away, at times.
Zampa xiquihto.  Amo nimitzcuamachilia.
Say it again.  I don't understand you.

Offline SGOS

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #26 on: October 01, 2019, 06:44:31 PM »
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Regards to OP
Bear mace is for pussies?

Fuck man, I'm not sure I'd even be comfortable with a can of that stuff in my house.
Well, you would want to keep it out of reach of little children for sure.

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #27 on: October 02, 2019, 06:42:46 AM »
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Anyone who lives with guns, sells guns should/would be the opposite of this. Because they are supposed to know the psychology of carrying a deadly weapon. There is a huge responsibility in selling such a product, the way they market and sell it and what they make people feel about it. If they are not, something is seriously wrong. This is not normal in any way. Can these people spend any time away from any fire arms, shooting and killing something just the for the heck of it? I doubt it. It's like drugs in a way. How do you act around someone like that? There isn't a very long step away from that unhealthy relationship with fire arms to shooting oneself when drunk and depressed or shooting people around when felt betrayed, angry or frustrated.

When the y-donor was well into dementia he could still buy guns at the local shop. We know that on at least one occasion he bought one while wearing just his tighty-whitey and a t-shirt. The gun shop owner took his money. And there was no waiting period because "He was  a known customer."
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers

Offline Sal1981

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #28 on: October 02, 2019, 09:32:34 AM »
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Domestic or wild rams?
They're wild rams, well free-roaming more like.
"The first principle is that you must not fool yourself - and you are the easiest person to fool" --- Richard P. Feynman

Offline SGOS

Re: Bear On the Trail
« Reply #29 on: October 02, 2019, 09:50:05 AM »
Ah, ferals.

 

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