Author Topic: Greek myths  (Read 599 times)

Offline Munch

Greek myths
« on: January 30, 2019, 06:22:52 PM »
Heres something not often brought up much on the religious front, due to it being a now far gone belief.

When it comes to modern or still existing faiths, I often find them repugnant in their storytelling, often hypocritical and stuff made up by daydreamers, like a single deity to make people feel safe and giving their life purpose to worship a single entity. This really has felt like a downplay to the concept of faith that mankind once to use to follow.

It started reading a lot of greek mythology in my teens and back then loved the stories. From the stories to the movies and adaptions into comics, cartoons, games and other stuff, for me the greek myths have always been a compelling area of literature.

(this guys channel is really good in discription and summery of mythological characters from greek to norse and other similar myths)
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What I like about greek myths like the greeks gods, is unlike modern depictions of things like the christian god Yahweh or Islamic figures like Muhammad, who are deified as perfect by modern religions, in ancient times the greek gods were much more human in their approach. They were petty, jealous, could anger easily, or even get rapey. But they could also be decent, loving, and forgiving. They were figures made by people that actually reflected humanity as it really is, instead of the desire for something beyond peoples moral understanding.

its easier to relate to characters in greek myths because there more like people , and so even today you could write stories about them. how many adaptations of hercules has there been so far?
« Last Edit: January 30, 2019, 06:24:57 PM by Munch »

Offline Baruch

Re: Greek myths
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2019, 07:56:54 PM »
Hence my choosing to accommodate polytheism and anthropomorphism.  The puritanism of Greek philosophy is what ruined paganism, and fossilized the Abrahamic faiths as soulless ideals.  In the OT ... David is a real man, not a saint.
πŽπŽœπŽœπŽŸπŽŒπŽ€πŽπŽŽπŽ€πŽ€πŽšπŽ€πŽŸπŽπŽœπŽœπŽŸπŽπŽ€πŽπŽ‰πŽ€πŽ€πŽšπŽ€
luu shalmaata luu balt’aata
May you be well, may you be healthy

Offline trdsf

Re: Greek myths
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2019, 10:05:41 PM »
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It started reading a lot of greek mythology in my teens and back then loved the stories. From the stories to the movies and adaptions into comics, cartoons, games and other stuff, for me the greek myths have always been a compelling area of literature.

What I like about greek myths like the greeks gods, is unlike modern depictions of things like the christian god Yahweh or Islamic figures like Muhammad, who are deified as perfect by modern religions, in ancient times the greek gods were much more human in their approach. They were petty, jealous, could anger easily, or even get rapey. But they could also be decent, loving, and forgiving. They were figures made by people that actually reflected humanity as it really is, instead of the desire for something beyond peoples moral understanding.

its easier to relate to characters in greek myths because there more like people , and so even today you could write stories about them. how many adaptations of hercules has there been so far?
Stephen Fry made very much the same point -- the appeal of classical Hellenistic mythology is that the deities are humans writ large.  We can understand them and their motivations, and that makes them accessible and approachable and relatable.

If I had to pick a religion to be "true", you could do a lot worse than the Greek gods.  Certainly in terms of which religions are currently dominant, we already have done a lot worse...
Sir Terry Pratchett, on being told about the theory that the universe is a computer simulation: "If we all get out and in again, would it start to work properly this time?"

Offline Cavebear

Re: Greek myths
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2019, 07:49:18 AM »
I find a progression in deistic beliefs.  Many to start and very human.  Then fewer and more powerful.  Finally, one and all powerful.

All we need is one less deity so we can be free of this idiocy....  And the sooner the better.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline Baruch

Re: Greek myths
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2019, 09:49:48 AM »
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I find a progression in deistic beliefs.  Many to start and very human.  Then fewer and more powerful.  Finally, one and all powerful.

All we need is one less deity so we can be free of this idiocy....  And the sooner the better.

Ockham's Razor.  There is only one thing because I can't count to two, "because I had an accident in wood shop and only have one thumb left between both hands, no fingers?"?  True story, my god-father lost his thumb not not the other four fingers, that way.

Another great Middle Ages logic ...

Buridan's Ass - a donkey stuck exactly between two bales of hay, starves because it can't decide which bale to eat?  A seeming paradox regarding free will.

How about nihilism?  There is nothing.  That is one less than one.
πŽπŽœπŽœπŽŸπŽŒπŽ€πŽπŽŽπŽ€πŽ€πŽšπŽ€πŽŸπŽπŽœπŽœπŽŸπŽπŽ€πŽπŽ‰πŽ€πŽ€πŽšπŽ€
luu shalmaata luu balt’aata
May you be well, may you be healthy

Offline Cavebear

Re: Greek myths
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2019, 09:36:23 AM »
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Ockham's Razor.  There is only one thing because I can't count to two, "because I had an accident in wood shop and only have one thumb left between both hands, no fingers?"?  True story, my god-father lost his thumb not not the other four fingers, that way.

Another great Middle Ages logic ...

Buridan's Ass - a donkey stuck exactly between two bales of hay, starves because it can't decide which bale to eat?  A seeming paradox regarding free will.

How about nihilism?  There is nothing.  That is one less than one.

Multitudinous stuffs...

My Dad had a garage mechanic friend missing a finger.  He got careless around an engine in the shop.  An another friend was blinded cleaning an early mower when it blew up.  And Dad lost 2 subordinates in a military gas engine explosion in a test room. 

No donkey can get stuck that way.  Wind or random events move them one side or the other.

Nihilism cannot be "0".  Thinking of it creates a value.

The sound of one hand clapping is a slap.

A tree falling in the forest does make a noise.

The Egg came first.

Work on those a while.



Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline Baruch

Re: Greek myths
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2019, 12:53:00 PM »
You have achieved a new level of incoherence.  Imitating my stream of consciousness?  You can't even step into it once, let along twice ;-)
πŽπŽœπŽœπŽŸπŽŒπŽ€πŽπŽŽπŽ€πŽ€πŽšπŽ€πŽŸπŽπŽœπŽœπŽŸπŽπŽ€πŽπŽ‰πŽ€πŽ€πŽšπŽ€
luu shalmaata luu balt’aata
May you be well, may you be healthy

 

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