Author Topic: One of the Sun's Sibling Stars Has Been Found. And It's Actually Pretty Close  (Read 155 times)

Offline Cavebear

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Blog posts are both meaningful and meaningless.

No, seriously, I think you would really enjoy reading the SA Sept 2018 issue.  It's a lot of "why are we what we are"...

And yeah, I'm behind in my reading...
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

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I consider that there are 2 possibilities of life in the universe.  There might be just one (us). Or there might be 3 or more.   

But there can't be just 2.

One is a fluke, not likely to be repeated.  3 or more suggests it is common.  And if 3, multitudes...

But you just can't have 2 "flukes"...

So we are either alone or of multitudes...

I think it more likely that we are alone. But at the same time, there's a "You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login' that means we should be approximately typical. I don't know what to believe. But I just feel that we're very much atypical. We've only been looking for ET for a short time, though, so there's no reason to assume too much. We should definitely keep looking, because if we don't we might miss something really interesting out there.
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"In life, unlike chess, the game continues after checkmate."
Isaac Asimov

Offline Baruch

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I think it more likely that we are alone. But at the same time, there's a "You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login' that means we should be approximately typical. I don't know what to believe. But I just feel that we're very much atypical. We've only been looking for ET for a short time, though, so there's no reason to assume too much. We should definitely keep looking, because if we don't we might miss something really interesting out there.

Giant space bypass advertising ... "Eat At Zaphod's Or Zaphod Will Eat You"
πŽπŽœπŽœπŽŸπŽŒπŽ€πŽπŽŽπŽ€πŽ€πŽšπŽ€πŽŸπŽπŽœπŽœπŽŸπŽπŽ€πŽπŽ‰πŽ€πŽ€πŽšπŽ€
luu shalmaata luu balt’aata
May you be well, may you be healthy

Offline trdsf

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I think it more likely that we are alone. But at the same time, there's a "You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login' that means we should be approximately typical. I don't know what to believe. But I just feel that we're very much atypical. We've only been looking for ET for a short time, though, so there's no reason to assume too much. We should definitely keep looking, because if we don't we might miss something really interesting out there.
There's also the problem of the narrow windows of time in which a technological civilization might be detectable at a distance. We've been emitting significant EM radiation for barely a century and even though the information throughput today is vastly greater than when the first big broadcasters like KDKA and the BBC went on the air, the leakage is growing less and less. Communications are more and more either a tight beam up to a satellite that broadcasts downward -- no use to a listener even as near as Proxima Centauri -- or fiber optic, never even leaving the planet's surface -- no use to a listener even in low Earth orbit.  So it may well be that there's only a brief opportunity to hear even a nearby civilization: our radio leakage shouldn't be thought of as a sphere, but as a bubble. Eventually there will be just a shell, and no further way to detect intelligent life here until and unless we terraform another planet in this system (detectable in principle by spectrographic analysis) or do something on the Kardashev scale.
Sir Terry Pratchett, on being told about the theory that the universe is a computer simulation: "If we all get out and in again, would it start to work properly this time?"

 

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