Author Topic: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.  (Read 3722 times)

Offline AllPurposeAtheist

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #240 on: October 04, 2018, 01:23:58 AM »
We MUST have manned missions to Mars so we can have Trump brand Martian Mineral Water™® available in your grocers freezer before the next presidential election!  And don't forget that big beautiful wall around all known water on Mars to keep undesirables from stealing what's rightfully his..
« Last Edit: October 04, 2018, 01:28:16 AM by AllPurposeAtheist »
All hail my new signature!

Admit it. You're secretly green with envy.

Offline Baruch

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #241 on: October 28, 2018, 08:09:09 AM »
Mars has an active volcano ...

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Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #242 on: October 28, 2018, 05:39:59 PM »
It doesn't seem to be an active volcano, but rather left-overs from a recent dust storm. It is near a volcano, however. But I don't think it's active.
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Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #243 on: October 28, 2018, 05:54:40 PM »
Tectonic activity? Don't think so.
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
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Offline trdsf

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #244 on: October 29, 2018, 12:28:04 AM »
No, Mars is geologically inactive, so far as we know.  They're going to be landing an ultrasensitive seismometer there next month on the You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login.  There's no known tectonic activity or active volcanoes, but there may be some geological settling going on; depends on how long ago the core cooled.  There's only a remnant of the original magnetosphere, west of the Tharsis volcano complex and centered over the southern hemisphere, so there's probably only a few hotspots left in the Martian core, no actual liquid flow.  Without a molten core and mobile mantle, there can be no tectonic plate movement.

Anyway, even if most of what InSight is going to sense are meteor impacts, those will help provide infomation on Mars' core.
Sir Terry Pratchett, on being told about the theory that the universe is a computer simulation: "If we all get out and in again, would it start to work properly this time?"

Offline Baruch

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #245 on: October 29, 2018, 04:22:07 AM »
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No, Mars is geologically inactive, so far as we know.  They're going to be landing an ultrasensitive seismometer there next month on the You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login.  There's no known tectonic activity or active volcanoes, but there may be some geological settling going on; depends on how long ago the core cooled.  There's only a remnant of the original magnetosphere, west of the Tharsis volcano complex and centered over the southern hemisphere, so there's probably only a few hotspots left in the Martian core, no actual liquid flow.  Without a molten core and mobile mantle, there can be no tectonic plate movement.

Anyway, even if most of what InSight is going to sense are meteor impacts, those will help provide infomation on Mars' core.

Then how to explain that ... liquid water?
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Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #246 on: November 06, 2018, 04:30:12 PM »
It's never aliens...unless it's aliens:


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This is a bit off topic, but I didn't see a better place for it, and didn't think it needed a new thread all its own.

I personally doubt that Oumuamua was an alien solar sail, but I could certainly be wrong.

What do y'all think?
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"Being dead is like being stupid, it's only painful for others."
Ricky Gervais

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #247 on: November 06, 2018, 05:00:11 PM »
Not enough cross-section to be a sail unless the payload was tiny. Remember Mote in God's Eye? MacArthur's pilot thought they were about to attack a moon. The ship itself, cut free from the sail, fit into Mac's hangar bay neatly. (Impact damage excepted, of course.)
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers

Offline trdsf

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #248 on: November 06, 2018, 11:04:16 PM »
Well, the simple solution is to catch up with it and examine it closely.  We have about ten to twenty thousand years before it leaves the Sun's sphere of gravitational influence...
Sir Terry Pratchett, on being told about the theory that the universe is a computer simulation: "If we all get out and in again, would it start to work properly this time?"

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #249 on: November 07, 2018, 10:13:34 AM »
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Well, the simple solution is to catch up with it and examine it closely.  We have about ten to twenty thousand years before it leaves the Sun's sphere of gravitational influence...
The raccoons can go out and take a look.
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #250 on: November 07, 2018, 01:35:39 PM »
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Well, the simple solution is to catch up with it and examine it closely.  We have about ten to twenty thousand years before it leaves the Sun's sphere of gravitational influence...
How fast would a probe have to move to catch up to it?
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"Being dead is like being stupid, it's only painful for others."
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Offline Baruch

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #251 on: November 07, 2018, 07:43:52 PM »
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How fast would a probe have to move to catch up to it?

Greater than 42km/sec from Earth distance to Sun ... is escape velocity from the Solar System.  So assuming the probe is going at least that fast, then the catch up vehicle has to be going even faster.
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Offline trdsf

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #252 on: November 08, 2018, 07:21:09 PM »
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How fast would a probe have to move to catch up to it?
If it wasn't bound to an elliptical solar orbit, the Parker Solar Probe could do it easily.  It's the fastest space probe ever now, having reached a velocity of 213,500mph (about 60 miles a second) or 95.4 kilometers per second.  'Oumuamua is moving at a relatively stately 26.3 km/s -- which is quite a bit faster than our fastest outward-bound probes, the Voyagers, Pioneers and New Horizons.  Voyager 1, the fastest of them, is moving "only" 17 km/s.

It turns out that it's possible that we could actually get a probe to it in as little as You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login.  It's not as unreachable as we thought.  I think we should drop a probe on it to travel the galaxy with it and at least leave some further notice that we were here.
Sir Terry Pratchett, on being told about the theory that the universe is a computer simulation: "If we all get out and in again, would it start to work properly this time?"

Offline Baruch

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #253 on: November 08, 2018, 07:28:20 PM »
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If it wasn't bound to an elliptical solar orbit, the Parker Solar Probe could do it easily.  It's the fastest space probe ever now, having reached a velocity of 213,500mph (about 60 miles a second) or 95.4 kilometers per second.  'Oumuamua is moving at a relatively stately 26.3 km/s -- which is quite a bit faster than our fastest outward-bound probes, the Voyagers, Pioneers and New Horizons.  Voyager 1, the fastest of them, is moving "only" 17 km/s.

It turns out that it's possible that we could actually get a probe to it in as little as You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login.  It's not as unreachable as we thought.  I think we should drop a probe on it to travel the galaxy with it and at least leave some further notice that we were here.

Humanity should extinct with embarrassment.
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Offline Cavebear

Re: This is huge: *current* liquid water on Mars.
« Reply #254 on: November 09, 2018, 10:58:24 AM »
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Cats like to keep their spare food supply close ... that is why they check you out.

I'm hoping to die while my cats are outside in Springtime.  Seriously, I don't want my family to discover they ate me.  I wouldn't care, of course, being dead, but it might have a reduction in finding them new homes...
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

 

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