Author Topic: Biblical contradictions.  (Read 3319 times)

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #180 on: August 09, 2018, 12:38:35 PM »
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And I thought Tarzan could swing from branch to branch with ease.
How the heck can a mousetrap get to you?

Closer observation, and a better bait.


What is this?   A non-sequitur?
 
Winner of WitchSabrinas Best Advice Award 2012


We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real
tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. -Plato

Offline Cavebear

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #181 on: August 12, 2018, 05:51:41 AM »
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What is this?   A non-sequitur?

Of course.  That what he and Buruch and others like him do.  Confuse, separate, and dissemble...
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline Baruch

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #182 on: August 12, 2018, 06:02:47 AM »
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Of course.  That what he and Buruch and others like him do.  Confuse, separate, and dissemble...

Are you saying that Mousetrap is a sock puppet for me?  Really?  I think you got your paw stuck in the honey jar again, Poo.
שלום

Offline trdsf

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #183 on: August 13, 2018, 01:37:05 PM »
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I think I have a couple of them.
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login; Asimov has been my favorite author since I was twelve or so, and there's still a lot more of his books to obtain and read.

(fellow bibliophiles - I highly recommend LibraryThing for tracking your personal library; I have a lifetime account)
Sir Terry Pratchett, on being told about the theory that the universe is a computer simulation: "If we all get out and in again, would it start to work properly this time?"

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #184 on: August 17, 2018, 11:12:54 PM »
The only way to know if I read all of Asimov's books is to buy them all at once and start reading. Its either going to be "I read this one before", or "this is one that I missed".

I think most of us have a Bible laying around somewhere. MouseTrap do you mind sharing what science you got and where you found it in the Bible; just so we are all on the same page? ;-)

I'm not as much into science as Hakurei Reimu, but even I know Kant's science was outdated a long time ago. Kant you adjust?

BTW we wouldn't want you to run out of material, so here are a couple of places that are somewhere in the many topics on the forum: ( I don't know if anybody has compiled a list of all of them. obviously a few were discussed before I was around)

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not expecting god to show up, but if he does we’re going to have to beat the prick up.

Offline Baruch

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #185 on: August 18, 2018, 02:05:26 AM »
This ...

"Belief in the resurrection is based on the visionary experiences of Paul, Peter and Mary Magdalene." from above link to Jesus Seminar etc.

Now I don't know if those people existed, or if they had visionary experiences.  We do know that people have visionary experiences today, but we usually call them mental illness.  I have had minor paranormal experiences, but I don't rely on them for detailed information about "another world".  More commonly I have eidetic dreams.  They are suggestive to me that "things aren't as they seem to the secular eye".
שלום

Offline trdsf

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #186 on: August 18, 2018, 02:22:12 AM »
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The only way to know if I read all of Asimov's books is to buy them all at once and start reading. Its either going to be "I read this one before", or "this is one that I missed".
I re-read 'I, Robot' and the core Foundation trilogy once a year.  I always manage to find some idea I missed before.

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I think most of us have a Bible laying around somewhere. MouseTrap do you mind sharing what science you got and where you found it in the Bible; just so we are all on the same page? ;-)
I know I still have my New American edition from (Catholic) high school floating around somewhere.  I have never actually read the King James, but that's a Protestant version and having been raised Catholic, it was heretical.  :)

Of course, even at my most practicing, believing Catholic (I considered seminary for a while in my teens and was an altar boy and a lector in my parish), I understood the bible could only be taken metaphorically, simply because taking it literally means denying the evidence of your own eyes and the implications of logic and reason, and I was convinced we were given senses and reasoning facility for... well, a reason.  They weren't to be ignored, anyway.
Sir Terry Pratchett, on being told about the theory that the universe is a computer simulation: "If we all get out and in again, would it start to work properly this time?"

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #187 on: August 18, 2018, 01:37:18 PM »
I think one of my favorite Asimov stories was You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

I think his metaphorical tongue was firmly ensconced in his metaphorical cheek on that one!
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"The Republicans went from Abraham Lincoln to Sarah Palin to Donald Trump. No wonder they don't believe in evolution."
Any Borowitz

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #188 on: August 18, 2018, 04:00:41 PM »
I have all of the following Asimov titles, covering the Robot, Empire and Foundation Series, in Audible audiobook format except for Robots and Empire, for which there is no Audible version.  I'm reading through them again, in the suggested sequence, after a few year hiatus.  I am currently reading The Stars, Like Dust.


The author himself, Isaac Asimov, wrote in the Author's Note of the Prelude to Foundation that he is providing a guide for those readers that might appreciate it since the books "were not written in the order in which (perhaps) they should be read." Therein, he offers the following chronological order:
 
  • The Complete Robot (1982) Collection of 31 Short Stories about robots.
  • The Caves of Steel (1954) His first Robot novel.
  • The Naked Sun (1957) The second Robot novel.
  • The Robots of Dawn (1983) The third Robot novel.
  • Robots and Empire (1985) The fourth (final) Robot novel.
  • The Currents of Space (1952) The first Empire novel.
  • The Stars, Like Dust-- (1951) The second Empire novel.
  • Pebble in the Sky (1950) The third and final Empire novel.
  • Prelude to Foundation (1988) The first Foundation novel.
  • Forward the Foundation (1992) The second Foundation novel. (Not in Asimov's list as it had not been written yet.)
  • Foundation (1951) The third Foundation novel, comprised of 5 stories originally published between 1942-1949.
  • Foundation and Empire (1952) The fourth Foundation novel, comprised of 2 stories originally published in 1945.
  • Second Foundation (1953) The fifth Foundation novel, comprised of 2 stories originally published in 1948 and 1949.
  • Foundation's Edge (1982) The sixth Foundation novel.
  • Foundation and Earth (1983) The seventh Foundation novel.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2018, 04:04:19 PM by sdelsolray »

Offline Cavebear

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #189 on: August 22, 2018, 06:07:15 AM »
All hail Asimov!  My favorite part of Foundation series was when the Mule showed up and it didn't matter!
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #190 on: August 22, 2018, 01:49:51 PM »
All hail Hari Seldon!
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"The Republicans went from Abraham Lincoln to Sarah Palin to Donald Trump. No wonder they don't believe in evolution."
Any Borowitz

Offline Hydra009

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #191 on: August 22, 2018, 03:22:33 PM »
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All hail Asimov!  My favorite part of Foundation series was when the Mule showed up and it didn't matter!
That part really freaked me out.  Everything was going along swimmingly, crises would happen and people would panic, but Hari Seldon's hologram would always give reassurance.  Then we got one hell of a crisis and the hologram was completely wrong!  The sudden realization that this was unforeseen, there's no plan in place to deal with it, and defeat is now a real possibility was just as jarring to me as it was to the Foundation.

Eventually things straighten out and you could say it didn't matter in the long haul, but in the short term it seemed to matter a great deal!  I suppose this was Asimov's critique of Great Man theory - that highly influential people have had a huge impact on society, changing to course of history as we know it.  In reality, we're all products of our environment and the inexorable tide of social and historical trends push us to one outcome or another, albeit with certain anomalies along the way.

Offline Baruch

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #192 on: August 22, 2018, 04:44:13 PM »
Y'all don't get it, because you don't consider the cult of Hari Seldon as a religion.  His followers with access to the holograms were driving the ship.  The whole psychohistory was BS, to provide employment to his dishonest students.
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Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #193 on: August 22, 2018, 07:31:36 PM »
Hari Seldon was a bit player in Asimov's writings.  The real hero was R. Danelle Olivaw.

Offline trdsf

Re: Biblical contradictions.
« Reply #194 on: August 23, 2018, 12:31:11 AM »
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Hari Seldon was a bit player in Asimov's writings.  The real hero was R. Danelle Olivaw.
Certainly the pivot around which the galaxy eventually turned.

There was a disturbing amount of mind control -- some of it quite aggressive -- going on in the extended Foundation universe.  R. Giskard was circumspect in Robots of Dawn, but by the end of Robots and Empire, he was quite cavalierly mentally pushing around not just random inconvenient humans, but his own mistress Gladia.  The Mule, of course, was indifferent to how his ability affected others.  I always though of Han Pritcher as the most tragic character in Foundation: despite his obvious abilities he was only briefly the master of his own fate.  Even after the Mule died, the Second Foundation never bothered to release him from the Mule's control — he's referred to in "...And Now You Don't" as having succeeded the Mule as First Citizen and warring with the (First) Foundation, so obviously he was never de-controlled even though we know the Second Foundation could break the Conversion.

Daneel at least appears to have used his control with more care and delicacy than Giskard did, but like Giskard did with Lije Baley, Daneel didn't hesitate to put the whammy on Seldon to prevent him from being able to talk about Daneel and his abilities.
Sir Terry Pratchett, on being told about the theory that the universe is a computer simulation: "If we all get out and in again, would it start to work properly this time?"

 

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