Author Topic: Sprite work  (Read 87 times)

Sprite work
« on: May 12, 2018, 12:24:31 PM »
I recently started working on some sprites for a fan game I'm planning to make with Construct 2. They're made in the style of the Legacy of Goku series for the Gameboy Advance. Here's what I have to show so far.





"Oh, wearisome condition of humanity,
Born under one law, to another bound;
Vainly begot, and yet forbidden vanity,
Created sick, commanded to be sound."
--Fulke Greville

Offline Mr.Obvious

Re: Sprite work
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2018, 12:16:11 PM »
Cool, a friend of mine toils around with rpg maker, sometimes.
Is this better?
"Intention is no matter. Only consequence has true form."
- Spencer Porkensenson

Re: Sprite work
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2018, 12:44:22 PM »
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Cool, a friend of mine toils around with rpg maker, sometimes.
Is this better?

I have RPG Maker VX Ace. It's definitely more user friendly, but it is more limited in what you can do. In RPG Maker, you get a screen with blank tiles. To make an evironment, simply click on a tile you want to use and then click on the space you want to fill that tile with. It's a lot like Paint, with a draw tool and a paint bucket of sorts. Then to create an NPC, you double click the space you want to be the NPC's default position, and it brings up the event editor, where you can select the NPC's sprites and program their behaviors.

It's mostly intuitive, although some things require a bit of creative use of tools to accomplish. For example, to make use of a "password," you have to have a blank character. To speak the password, you bring up the naming screen and then have the game check to see if that character's chosen name matches the password you have in mind.

RPG Maker comes as basically a fully functioning game from the start, and just lets you create the characters, environments, items, etc to fill it with. You don't have to worry about programming a battle system or anything like that. But while convenient, that also means that if you want to change how stuff like that works, things get a lot more complicated. You can make use of scripts, if you learn an appropriate coding language, or you can see if someone already made a script and shared it with the public and make use of it (don't forget to give credit, if you do). But at that point, the software stops being convenient and easy.

Construct is also pretty intuitive, but you have to do more work yourself to get similar results. On the other hand, that also means you have more direct control and fewer limitations. Construct isn't limited to just RPGs either. You can make platformers, shoot `em ups, or pretty much any 2D genre you can think of. You can even create online play, or put the game on a phone, but you have to pay for those features. Construct 2 is currently free on Steam, but the free version has severe limits. You're going to want to pay for a license if you want to get serious about a project.
"Oh, wearisome condition of humanity,
Born under one law, to another bound;
Vainly begot, and yet forbidden vanity,
Created sick, commanded to be sound."
--Fulke Greville

 

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