Author Topic: Thoughts About Relativity  (Read 1864 times)

Offline trdsf

Re: Thoughts About Relativity
« Reply #30 on: February 02, 2018, 02:19:07 PM »
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Do YOU understand "pilot wave theory"?
I think it was Feynman who said, "If you think you understand quantum theory, you don't understand quantum theory."

Pilot wave theory (in the simplified outline way I grasp it) makes more sense to me than the Copenhagen Interpretation, mainly because it seems to provide a more cause/effect way of explaining activity on the quantum level.

Of course, that probably means I don't understand it.  :D
Sir Terry Pratchett, on being told about the theory that the universe is a computer simulation: "If we all get out and in again, would it start to work properly this time?"

Online Cavebear

Re: Thoughts About Relativity
« Reply #31 on: February 02, 2018, 02:25:41 PM »
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I think it was Feynman who said, "If you think you understand quantum theory, you don't understand quantum theory."

Pilot wave theory (in the simplified outline way I grasp it) makes more sense to me than the Copenhagen Interpretation, mainly because it seems to provide a more cause/effect way of explaining activity on the quantum level.

Of course, that probably means I don't understand it.  :D

I don't even understand GRAVITY!  Or its opposite, LEVITY (poor joke, sorry).  I hope Scientific American has an article on it soon.  Quite frankly, they help me understand some things...
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Online Baruch

Re: Thoughts About Relativity
« Reply #32 on: February 02, 2018, 07:32:42 PM »
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I don't even understand GRAVITY!  Or its opposite, LEVITY (poor joke, sorry).  I hope Scientific American has an article on it soon.  Quite frankly, they help me understand some things...

Levity per Mary Poppins ...

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My physics teacher in HS said he always read all the articles in Scientific American each month, because it challenged him to try to understand many new things.
שלום

Re: Thoughts About Relativity
« Reply #33 on: February 02, 2018, 07:51:18 PM »
That's one of my favorite scenes from that movie! I often watch it when I need a pick-me-up.
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Online Cavebear

Re: Thoughts About Relativity
« Reply #34 on: February 07, 2018, 06:22:15 AM »
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Levity per Mary Poppins ...

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My physics teacher in HS said he always read all the articles in Scientific American each month, because it challenged him to try to understand many new things.

Its seems to me that Scientific American was nearly all hard math when I was young.  Either they changed or I did.  I hope it was me.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline Hakurei Reimu

Re: Thoughts About Relativity
« Reply #35 on: February 07, 2018, 01:40:26 PM »
Nope. They did. Sadly.
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Online Cavebear

Re: Thoughts About Relativity
« Reply #36 on: February 09, 2018, 01:59:43 AM »
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Nope. They did. Sadly.

I thought so.  On the other hand, I get more understanding from them than I used to get. 
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline SGOS

Re: Thoughts About Relativity
« Reply #37 on: February 09, 2018, 07:27:10 AM »
Way back, it seemed like the Atlantic was caught between a professional journal and lay magazine.  I'm not sure how much demand for that would be in a general readership.  There is a lot to be said for magazines written to help the public stay in touch with new science, without laying out a lot of data.

In one of Stephen Hawking's books, he gave a special thanks to his editor in the introduction.  Hawking wanted the book to be for the public and said he was trying to follow the editor's advice who cautioned him that every time he used an equation, he would lose 1/4 of his reader's interest.

I don't think he lasted 4 pages before he felt compelled to write an equation.  It was a doozey too, with special symbols never before seen, along with the usual math function symbols or some abbreviations thereof.  And they kept showing up.  He was obsessed with equations, apparently unable to talk to normal people without them, and unable to heed the advice he most needed to hear to achieve his goal.

Online Cavebear

Re: Thoughts About Relativity
« Reply #38 on: February 13, 2018, 03:18:12 AM »
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Way back, it seemed like the Atlantic was caught between a professional journal and lay magazine.  I'm not sure how much demand for that would be in a general readership.  There is a lot to be said for magazines written to help the public stay in touch with new science, without laying out a lot of data.

In one of Stephen Hawking's books, he gave a special thanks to his editor in the introduction.  Hawking wanted the book to be for the public and said he was trying to follow the editor's advice who cautioned him that every time he used an equation, he would lose 1/4 of his reader's interest.

I don't think he lasted 4 pages before he felt compelled to write an equation.  It was a doozey too, with special symbols never before seen, along with the usual math function symbols or some abbreviations thereof.  And they kept showing up.  He was obsessed with equations, apparently unable to talk to normal people without them, and unable to heed the advice he most needed to hear to achieve his goal.

Well, I haven't argued any equations with Hawkings.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

 

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