Author Topic: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo  (Read 1069 times)

Offline Baruch

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2018, 01:07:10 PM »
See, as soon as one take the more or less correct view, that the god of theology is incomprehensible, why don't theologians conclude, that they are ridiculous?

The god of theology, is a rationalization of a religious belief system/practice.  Now whatever you may think about religious belief systems/practices, this by itself ... a rationalization, defeats itself.  This is why I can't accept any theology per se.  Rationalization is something I see no point in doing.
שלום

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #16 on: January 30, 2018, 01:15:40 PM »
Quote from: H.L. Mencken, in On Theologians
There is, in fact, no reason to believe that any given natural phenomenon, however marvelous it may seem today, will remain forever inexplicable. Soon or late the laws governing the production of life itself will be discovered in the laboratory, and man may set up business as a creator on his own account.

The thing, indeed, is not only conceivable; it is even highly probable. When it comes to pass the theologians will be staggered, but I do not go so far as to predict that they will be undone. More than once in the past, seeing this miracle or that suddenly transformed into an ordinary marvel, responsive to lowly natural laws, they have edged out of disaster by abandoning it quietly and turning to another. Their art and mystery will be secure so long as the supply holds out, and that, no doubt, will be a long time.

Their effort to occupy all the areas not yet conquered by science -- in other words, their bold claim that what no one knows is their special province, that ignorance itself is a superior kind of knowledge, that their most fantastic guess must hold good until it is disproved -- all this is certainly absurd enough, but even more absurd is their frequent attempt, just mentioned, to find support for their dogmas in what they allege to be overt facts.
God Not Found
"I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark.”
Stephen Hawking

Offline Cavebear

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2018, 04:46:16 AM »
Many years ago a co-worker invited me to have dinner with him and his family, during the course of which I mentioned to his kids that we all came from star dust. You should've seen how quickly the parents were both on it, to say "no we weren't! God made us from the dust of the Earth!" I just shut up and left as soon as it was polite to do so.

When I was 17, I was invited to have dinner with the family of my girlfriend.  Her family was Italian-Irish.   First, as the guest, I was invited to "say Grace".  I didn't have a clue!  I managed something like "For the food we are about to receive, we thank you".    Whew...

Then came dinner.  My girlfriend had, of course, cooked it, so I had to declare it "perfect".  Spaghetti.  I love spaghetti.  Serious thick tomato sauce and lots of it!  And here was a bowl of tomato soup for spooning over it.  Thin weak stuff.  And I had to take my portion first, no clue about how her family doused the pasta...

I tried putting a small amount on the top and passed the bowl.  Evidently, that was correct.  Or they followed my lead.  Who knows?  I asked her later about it and she was surprised.  They ate pasta with only a little thin sauce on top.

We parted ways a few years later (she got more religious and I became less so), but I was sure glad to return to the CORRECT way (coff, coff) of eating spaghetti.  LOTS of thick sauce.  I LOVE tomatoes!

Years later, a co-worker related a similar event in her life.  Same thin sauce, and she did it right in the same way...

Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline Baruch

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #18 on: February 02, 2018, 12:26:56 PM »
My wife was Italian-American.  We always had thick sauce.

What do you mean, you became less religious?  You claim to have never ever been religious ;-)

My dad, when he was in the Navy, visited Naples Italy.  He saw how they ate spaghetti there ... you spin it up on a fork using a spoon for assistance.

Also possibly a small amount of sauce was tradition, because people were too poor to lay on much sauce.
שלום

Offline Cavebear

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2018, 12:37:23 PM »
My wife was Italian-American.  We always had thick sauce.

What do you mean, you became less religious?  You claim to have never ever been religious ;-)

My dad, when he was in the Navy, visited Naples Italy.  He saw how they ate spaghetti there ... you spin it up on a fork using a spoon for assistance.

Also possibly a small amount of sauce was tradition, because people were too poor to lay on much sauce.

I was non-religious as a youth, then actively anti-religious when I realized how harmful the whole goddish superstition was. 

Today, here, spahetti est omnis divisa in partes tres.  No spoon required.

And no one in Italy had tomato sauce until after Columbus and long after that, as tomatoes were considered poisonous, BTW.  They stewed the leaves and became ill.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline Baruch

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2018, 12:48:35 PM »
I was non-religious as a youth, then actively anti-religious when I realized how harmful the whole goddish superstition was. 

Today, here, spahetti est omnis divisa in partes tres.  No spoon required.

And no one in Italy had tomato sauce until after Columbus and long after that, as tomatoes were considered poisonous, BTW.  They stewed the leaves and became ill.

Green tomatoes are still poisonous.  You can't eat them raw.  Only the big green worms eat the leaves!

So based on the quote, I guess you will have a Caesar salad with that?
שלום

Offline Cavebear

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #21 on: February 02, 2018, 12:51:20 PM »
Green tomatoes are still poisonous.  You can't eat them raw.  Only the big green worms eat the leaves!

So based on the quote, I guess you will have a Caesar salad with that?

And the leaves are still rather toxic.  And Caesar never saw one in his life, so no Caesar Salad for HIM!
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline Baruch

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #22 on: February 02, 2018, 01:02:11 PM »
And the leaves are still rather toxic.  And Caesar never saw one in his life, so no Caesar Salad for HIM!

That is why all Roman dictators employ food tasters! There were plenty of other poisons available.
שלום

Offline Cavebear

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #23 on: February 02, 2018, 01:13:39 PM »
That is why all Roman dictators employ food tasters! There were plenty of other poisons available.

And as kings did after tomatoes were introduced (and proven safe to eat).  You are changing the subject...
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline Baruch

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #24 on: February 02, 2018, 01:22:31 PM »
And as kings did after tomatoes were introduced (and proven safe to eat).  You are changing the subject...

Well actual Caesar dressing involves raw eggs ... eat with caution!
שלום

Offline Cavebear

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #25 on: February 02, 2018, 01:26:56 PM »
Well actual Caesar dressing involves raw eggs ... eat with caution!

Which is why I like my salads tossed and eggless.  Deregulation created contaminated eggs.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #26 on: February 02, 2018, 02:18:10 PM »
I recall hearing a story about how tomatoes were considered the devil's fruit, until some guy got up on a band-stand in the town square (I don't know what town) with a bushel basket of them and proceeded to eat them, one after the other, with no ill effects. That proved to people that they weren't so bad after all.
God Not Found
"I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark.”
Stephen Hawking

Offline Cavebear

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #27 on: February 02, 2018, 02:27:01 PM »
I recall hearing a story about how tomatoes were considered the devil's fruit, until some guy got up on a band-stand in the town square (I don't know what town) with a bushel basket of them and proceeded to eat them, one after the other, with no ill effects. That proved to people that they weren't so bad after all.

I seem to recall reading years ago that it was Providence Rhode Island.  But that's not proof.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline Baruch

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #28 on: February 02, 2018, 06:20:48 PM »
I recall hearing a story about how tomatoes were considered the devil's fruit, until some guy got up on a band-stand in the town square (I don't know what town) with a bushel basket of them and proceeded to eat them, one after the other, with no ill effects. That proved to people that they weren't so bad after all.

An American doctor in colonial times.  But he was eating red tomatoes.  And they used to be called "love apples" because they were rumored to be used by suicidal lovers.
שלום

Re: The Giant Apologetic Switcheroo
« Reply #29 on: February 02, 2018, 06:25:06 PM »
In Texas when I was a kid we used to eat fried green tomatoes. They were pretty good, as I recall.
God Not Found
"I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark.”
Stephen Hawking

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk