Author Topic: Mexico City Earthquake and Philosophy  (Read 40 times)

Offline Baruch (OP)

Mexico City Earthquake and Philosophy
« on: October 12, 2017, 06:47:54 AM »
https://thepointmag.com/2017/examined-life/incomprehensible-things-mexico-city-earthquake

So what does Descarte and Kant have to do with surviving an earthquake?
שלום

Offline Sal1981

Re: Mexico City Earthquake and Philosophy
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2017, 10:31:10 AM »
Quote
While Descartes aimed to show that the only thing I can be certain of is my own existence, Kant argued that in order for that to be possible I need to in fact be aware of the world around me as actually existing independent of me.
Which is why I'll always prefer Kant over Descartes.

The objections against such realization, often than not, border on radical skepticism, such as Stroud's claim tries to argue that subjectivity can only argue for subjectivity's sake, and you can't argue for an "outside" reality - this is solipsism.
"The first principle is that you must not fool yourself - and you are the easiest person to fool" --- Richard P. Feynman

Offline Baruch (OP)

Re: Mexico City Earthquake and Philosophy
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2017, 12:54:26 PM »
Which is why I'll always prefer Kant over Descartes.

The objections against such realization, often than not, border on radical skepticism, such as Stroud's claim tries to argue that subjectivity can only argue for subjectivity's sake, and you can't argue for an "outside" reality - this is solipsism.

This is why Zen is ultimately wrong.  Hui Neng, when he visited a temple where a discussion was on-going ... the sensei had pointed to a flag on a pole, that was moving back and forth.  Some disciples said the flag was waving.  Others said the wind was waving.  Hui Neng, the visitor, said that their minds were waving.  This put Hui Neng to the head of the class ... though not in Physics, but in psychology ;-)  Contemplation/meditation may be useful, but ultimately it is solipsistic.
שלום