Author Topic: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?  (Read 344 times)

Offline Baruch

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2017, 08:05:01 PM »
Anti-vaccine parents should see jail time for both public health threats and child abuse.

If they are irrational about it, yes.  But some people react badly to vaccines.  Perhaps an allergy reaction.  If that is shown, then alternatives should be made available.

All children are public health threats, thanks to schools.  All parents are child abusers ... because none of us know the hell what we are doing.
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Offline Cavebear

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #16 on: September 19, 2017, 03:25:38 AM »
If they are irrational about it, yes.  But some people react badly to vaccines.  Perhaps an allergy reaction.  If that is shown, then alternatives should be made available.

All children are public health threats, thanks to schools.  All parents are child abusers ... because none of us know the hell what we are doing.

"Anti-vaccine" is mostly defined as those fearing it for causes they fear might happen.  I was not, of course, referring to anyone with a true anti-vaccine reaction.  And you weren't either.  You were just playing to the fear of vaccines causing problems that they don't. 

You should know by now that I won't allow false arguments slide by without pointing them out.  Please stop doing that.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!  b 1950

Offline Baruch

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #17 on: September 19, 2017, 10:18:32 PM »
"Anti-vaccine" is mostly defined as those fearing it for causes they fear might happen.  I was not, of course, referring to anyone with a true anti-vaccine reaction.  And you weren't either.  You were just playing to the fear of vaccines causing problems that they don't. 

You should know by now that I won't allow false arguments slide by without pointing them out.  Please stop doing that.

You don't remember last year's discussion.  You weren't here, I was.  There was a debate about legal enforcement of vaccine rules.  Of course politicians being hell spawn ... there would be no exceptions, even for allergy.  Necessary casualties you know.  And someone here who claimed that there are no allergy reactions (someone who makes drugs for a living for Big Pharma).
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Offline Drew_2017

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #18 on: September 19, 2017, 11:17:19 PM »
You're right, there should be some kind of line, but damned if I know where to draw it.

I've seen people trashtalk each other with one person sometimes suggesting that the other person kill himself.  Hell, I've suggested to certain godspammers that show up here that they should take a long walk off a short pier.  Should I go to the nearest police station and turn myself in?

I followed this case closely, she was smart to let a judge rule on the case because as a jurist he would be setting some precedent to a degree or may be over ruled in the future. A jury would have thrown away the key this case is absolutely appalling. This was a troubled young impressionable man and she knew he was seriously considering suicide. The judge said he made his final decision based on the fact she told him to erase his phone and her last phone call demanding he get back in the car and not be a chicken. It was almost a suicide by Munchausen syndrome by proxy in which she would get sympathy for herself due to her boyfriend committing suicide. I agree with the judge whether it will stand up to appeal remains to be seen.

Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
Albert Einstein

https://www.dropbox.com/s/jex6k2uvf9aljrq/theism.rtf?dl=0

Offline Cavebear

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #19 on: September 23, 2017, 03:18:50 AM »
You don't remember last year's discussion.  You weren't here, I was.  There was a debate about legal enforcement of vaccine rules.  Of course politicians being hell spawn ... there would be no exceptions, even for allergy.  Necessary casualties you know.  And someone here who claimed that there are no allergy reactions (someone who makes drugs for a living for Big Pharma).

The valid arguments against vaccines have been refuted for a decade.  And you are incorrect in your assertion, generally.  If a few places were "no-exception" that was wrong.  Alergies and some other causes do exist.  But not the ones generally promoted by the crazies.  Heck, some of the same are still against fluoridated water.

You can't stop "stupid"...
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!  b 1950

Offline Baruch

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2017, 05:11:11 PM »
The valid arguments against vaccines have been refuted for a decade.  And you are incorrect in your assertion, generally.  If a few places were "no-exception" that was wrong.  Alergies and some other causes do exist.  But not the ones generally promoted by the crazies.  Heck, some of the same are still against fluoridated water.

You can't stop "stupid"...

Agreed .. I am saying medically valid, not faith healers ;-)
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Offline Sorginak

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #21 on: September 23, 2017, 05:14:20 PM »
Agreed .. I am saying medically valid, not faith healers ;-)

Modern idiots against vaxes aren't into faith healing.  They're into anti-vaxing based on anti-science thanks to the idiotic anti-GMO, craze.

Offline Baruch

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #22 on: September 23, 2017, 05:22:15 PM »
Modern idiots against vaxes aren't into faith healing.  They're into anti-vaxing based on anti-science thanks to the idiotic anti-GMO, craze.

No, has to do with the trace mercury in making the vaccines.  I am anti-GMO, because I think that the food giants should be executed for crimes against humanity, starting with Monsanto.  There are other invalid reasons for being anti-science.  I am not actually anti-science, I am anti ape men getting their hands on matches etc.
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Offline Sorginak

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #23 on: September 23, 2017, 05:25:41 PM »
No, has to do with the trace mercury in making the vaccines.  I am anti-GMO, because I think that the food giants should be executed for crimes against humanity, starting with Monsanto.  There are other invalid reasons for being anti-science.  I am not actually anti-science, I am anti ape men getting their hands on matches etc.

Oh, dear, you're one of those.  I'm sorry. 

Offline Baruch

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #24 on: September 23, 2017, 05:30:10 PM »
Oh, dear, you're one of those.  I'm sorry.

You worship at the church of the holy corporations?  Will things be better when we go from sheep that are 10% human, to ones that are 50% human, and the SJWs want to unionize them?
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Offline Sorginak

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #25 on: September 23, 2017, 05:33:25 PM »
You worship at the church of the holy corporations?  Will things be better when we go from sheep that are 10% human, to ones that are 50% human, and the SJWs want to unionize them?

Corporations are evil.

So are anti-vaxers and anti-GMO idiots. 

I can hate both, and for good reason.

Offline Baruch

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #26 on: September 23, 2017, 05:40:02 PM »
Corporations are evil.

So are anti-vaxers and anti-GMO idiots. 

I can hate both, and for good reason.

To each their own too small nut shell ;-)  Responsible medical vaccination I support.  Responsible bioengineering I support (but very carefully).  The problem isn't the science, it is the irresponsibility.  That impacts everything, even if we were living like Fred Flintstone.
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Offline Sorginak

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #27 on: September 23, 2017, 05:47:38 PM »
To each their own too small nut shell ;-)  Responsible medical vaccination I support.  Responsible bioengineering I support (but very carefully).  The problem isn't the science, it is the irresponsibility.  That impacts everything, even if we were living like Fred Flintstone.

Congrats on living in a larger nut shell than me, I suppose.

What I find irresponsible is charging people an arm and a leg to eat better while also supposedly conscientiously telling people to stop eating what they can realistically afford on a salary that is regulated by a government that thinks people can afford anything in an every increasingly greedy economic environment. 

But correct me if I am wrong.

Offline Baruch

Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #28 on: September 23, 2017, 05:49:49 PM »
Congrats on living in a larger nut shell than me, I suppose.

What I find irresponsible is charging people an arm and a leg to eat better while also supposedly conscientiously telling people to stop eating what they can realistically afford on a salary that is regulated by a government that thinks people can afford anything in an every increasingly greedy economic environment. 

But correct me if I am wrong.

You are unfortunately correct.  We are being seduced into a dystopia of other people's choosing, and they are the psychopaths.  It is a good thing that the Romans didn't have high technology, or we would have already self destructed as a species.  How about ... iPhone now supports para-mutual betting at the Colosseum?
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Re: Should convincing someone of a bad idea lead to prosecution?
« Reply #29 on: September 26, 2017, 01:52:12 AM »
O.P. maybe she should have been sent to a mental hospital instead of prison.
she was smart to let a judge rule on the case
Did she? I don't know how it works, but not every state gives a right to trial by jury for criminal offenses....

Baruch let Monsanto face the lions in the Coliseum. I would place some track-side bets on that. Monsanto's GMO lions vs. Monsanto's executive board. :-)

I couldn't help but notice what the storyline would be, if we substituted "Christian religion" into the posts.
Would you like to play with my invisible friend? HE can give you anything that you want. All you have to do is ask HIM