Author Topic: Hurricane Irma  (Read 934 times)

Offline SGOS

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #90 on: September 11, 2017, 10:51:44 AM »
When all fails, it is hard to beat a sealed compass and Polaris.
Also, like with hurricane problem, you need some way to know where you are, so you can plot the exact degrees you need to go to a destination.  I think that completes the basic necessities.

Offline Cavebear

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #91 on: September 11, 2017, 11:39:29 AM »
Also, like with hurricane problem, you need some way to know where you are, so you can plot the exact degrees you need to go to a destination.  I think that completes the basic necessities.

Well, if WWIII broke out and I was unfortunate enough to survive,  I would HAVE to try to survive.  I couldn't just decide not to.  And having a few weeks worth of canned foods would help.  Meanwhile, the grab and go backpack is comforting.  Grab the seed packets from the refrigerator too.  Leave the computer stuff behind.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline SGOS

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #92 on: September 11, 2017, 12:33:56 PM »
Well, if WWIII broke out and I was unfortunate enough to survive,  I would HAVE to try to survive.  I couldn't just decide not to.  And having a few weeks worth of canned foods would help.  Meanwhile, the grab and go backpack is comforting.  Grab the seed packets from the refrigerator too.  Leave the computer stuff behind.

I had a grab and go pack on the boat in case I had to abandon ship.  I also had an emergency beacon that trailed behind the life raft that would broadcast my location and identity for a day or two.  Airliners monitor that frequency and relay any signals to the Coast Guard or whatever safety agency some other country has.  Offshore rescues are often from commercial shipping or fishing vessels that have been alerted by the Coast Guard.  I've heard the system is fairly effective.

Life rafts are supposed to be certified by the Coast Guard every few years or so.  I suppose many are not, but are still reliable.  I certified mine at some business authorized to do that.  The first thing they did was demonstrate how to pull the cord and inflate the raft, which happens in seconds.  Then the guy walked me through the very limited and primitive safety accessories included in the raft, which was quite helpful.  He also coached me on survival.  He said, "First try to keep dry.  You will get wet, but stay as dry as you can.  You will probably get sick too, so try and vomit outside the canopy."  Sheesh!  Talk about a last ditch effort.  I wonder how many millions of dollars of life rafts are sold, never to be used, but they do give you a modicum of confidence knowing they are on board.

I usually don't like to talk about these things because I associate this kind of blather with well read weekend sailors who have never been out of sight of land, but consider themselves vast storehouses of knowledge.  The docks at marinas are full of them, and frankly they annoy me, constantly pointing out deficiencies and listing things you must have on board, and the horrible things that happen at sea.  They work on their boats mostly waxing and polishing, getting it ready for a fantasy trip across an ocean, but they never leave, except for a day sailing out in the bay. 

Yeah things break down at sea and you may have a bunch of parts on board, but it's doubtful you will have the right one.  You just think and jury rig stuff, make do, and keep on going.  My first breakdown horrified me for a day <OMG, OMG, OMG>, but you just keep going.  It eventually becomes a new normal.  I wintered in Hilo and I saw lots of rusty buckets minimally equipped that came into the harbor from California and Mexico.  It's not a daunting as you would think.  The hard part is making up your mind to leave the dock.  Really, that's the hump that most fantasy sailors can't seem to get past.

I friended many blue water sailors, single handers, whole families, some going around the world for a second time, and I can't remember swapping a single horror story about the sea.  Everyone of them was positive and living it up.  The best friend I made on the trip did it because his wife talked him into it.  She had already done it once before on an all woman crew, and wanted to share the experience with her husband.  The biggest horror stories always seem to come from the ones who haven't been there.

Offline Cavebear

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #93 on: September 11, 2017, 12:45:44 PM »
I had a grab and go pack on the boat in case I had to abandon ship.  I also had an emergency beacon that trailed behind the life raft that would broadcast my location and identity for a day or two.  Airliners monitor that frequency and relay any signals to the Coast Guard or whatever safety agency some other country has.  Offshore rescues are often from commercial shipping or fishing vessels that have been alerted by the Coast Guard.  I've heard the system is fairly effective.

Life rafts are supposed to be certified by the Coast Guard every few years or so.  I suppose many are not, but are still reliable.  I certified mine at some business authorized to do that.  The first thing they did was demonstrate how to pull the cord and inflate the raft, which happens in seconds.  Then the guy walked me through the very limited and primitive safety accessories included in the raft, which was quite helpful.  He also coached me on survival.  He said, "First try to keep dry.  You will get wet, but stay as dry as you can.  You will probably get sick too, so try and vomit outside the canopy."  Sheesh!  Talk about a last ditch effort.  I wonder how many millions of dollars of life rafts are sold, never to be used, but they do give you a modicum of confidence knowing they are on board.

I usually don't like to talk about these things because I associate this kind of blather with well read weekend sailors who have never been out of sight of land, but consider themselves vast storehouses of knowledge.  The docks at marinas are full of them, and frankly they annoy me, constantly pointing out deficiencies and listing things you must have on board, and the horrible things that happen at sea.  They work on their boats mostly waxing and polishing, getting it ready for a fantasy trip across an ocean, but they never leave, except for a day sailing out in the bay. 

Yeah things break down at sea and you may have a bunch of parts on board, but it's doubtful you will have the right one.  You just think and jury rig stuff, make do, and keep on going.  My first breakdown horrified me for a day <OMG, OMG, OMG>, but you just keep going.  It eventually becomes a new normal.  I wintered in Hilo and I saw lots of rusty buckets minimally equipped that came into the harbor from California and Mexico.  It's not a daunting as you would think.  The hard part is making up your mind to leave the dock.  Really, that's the hump that most fantasy sailors can't seem to get past.

I friended many blue water sailors, single handers, whole families, some going around the world for a second time, and I can't remember swapping a single horror story about the sea.  Everyone of them was positive and living it up.  The best friend I made on the trip did it because his wife talked him into it.  She had already done it once before on an all woman crew, and wanted to share the experience with her husband.  The biggest horror stories always seem to come from the ones who haven't been there.

There are posts many readers probably skim through.  I didn't.  It was great!

I'm the blue water type.  But Grandad had a lobster boat off NH and we went on it a few times.  Every threw up but me.  I loved it.

If push comes to shove, I hope we meet.  I'm pretty much not stupid on a boat.  LOL!
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Online aitm

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #94 on: September 11, 2017, 01:13:39 PM »
I made it through the storm, thanks for asking yoy fucktards 😘
A humans desire to live is exceeded only by their willingness to die for another. Even god cannot equal this magnificent sacrifice. No god has the right to judge them.-first tenant of the Panotheust

Offline SGOS

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #95 on: September 11, 2017, 01:20:14 PM »
I made it through the storm, thanks for asking yoy fucktards 😘
So do you have any good storm stories?

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #96 on: September 11, 2017, 01:20:55 PM »
I'm competent shipboard for a lander, but I had to look up "binacle".  Wonderful.  I keep a backpack in the basement "ready to go".  Nice to see the sensible side of you.  Sometimes we know too little about each other here.
I trained informally with a one-legged Marine from age 14 to age 18, then got professional survival training from the Navy. Still comes in handy when I have to go to the Mall in December.
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #97 on: September 11, 2017, 01:21:28 PM »
I made it through the storm, thanks for asking yoy fucktards 😘
Who are you, please?
We 'new atheists' have a reputation for being militant, but make no mistake  we didn't start this war. If you want to place blame put it on the the religious zealots who have been poisoning the minds of the  young for a long long time."
PZ Myers

Offline Cavebear

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #98 on: September 11, 2017, 01:29:28 PM »
I made it through the storm, thanks for asking yoy fucktards 😘
Hey, I didn't know you were in FL.

Ya gotta say you have a tight squeeze to get good strokes woofie.  I'm a cat guy, I don't read woofs well.  LOL!

But really, had I known...  It would have been, hey you OK?  Which coast you on? 

I spent days with those I knew were in Houston.  I spent the past few days talking to family and cat bloggers in FL.  I spent days talking to a friend in Isreal when it was being bombed.  As she dit me on 9-11 knowing I worked 2 blocks from The White House. 

Ya gotta tell people, "I'm in trouble here".  We would have replied....  We don't remember where everyone lives. 

Aside from that, you are one of my favorite woofs...

LOL!
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline Cavebear

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #99 on: September 11, 2017, 01:32:53 PM »
If you have a ruined house, and need a place to stay, just tell me.  Cavebear in MD.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline Baruch

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #100 on: September 11, 2017, 01:41:10 PM »
There are Mexican pirates that will chase sailboats up the W coast of Mexico .. as told in a true life story I read.  Don't know if they still have pirates in the Caribbean.
Χ©ΧœΧ•Χ

Offline Cavebear

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #101 on: September 11, 2017, 02:13:42 PM »
There are Mexican pirates that will chase sailboats up the W coast of Mexico .. as told in a true life story I read.  Don't know if they still have pirates in the Caribbean.

Pirates should be stooped an sunk when no innocents are aboard. 
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Offline SGOS

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #102 on: September 11, 2017, 03:03:06 PM »
I met sailors in Canada that were boarded in Mexico, tied up and robbed.  They managed to free themselves.  The perps were apprehended.  They went to court, and the judge let the perps go with a warning.  I can't remember if they got their stuff back.

Offline Cavebear

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #103 on: September 11, 2017, 03:17:43 PM »
I met sailors in Canada that were boarded in Mexico, tied up and robbed.  They managed to free themselves.  The perps were apprehended.  They went to court, and the judge let the perps go with a warning.  I can't remember if they got their stuff back.

I still the Yardarms for them...
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!

Re: Hurricane Irma
« Reply #104 on: September 11, 2017, 03:18:44 PM »
They oughta be keel-hauled!
God Not Found
"Never criticize someone unless you've walked a mile in his shoes. Then when you criticize him at least you'll be a mile away - and you'll have his shoes."
Ray Magliozzi
"Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted at all."