Author Topic: The Wise One's Burden  (Read 619 times)

The Wise One's Burden
« on: August 20, 2017, 07:25:25 PM »
Just came across this silly poem I wrote a little while back after discovering Absurdism. It's a little embarrassing but I thought you guys might have a good laugh. Don't ask why it's missing the last two lines.

The Wise One’s Burden
A).
Take up the Wise One’s Burden, to question the vast unknown
Embrace the stark absurd, to interrogate the worlds we own
Release the world from meaning, yet revolt against despair
Purposeless the world may be, yet that is the burden we bear
B).
Take up the Wise One’s Burden, to accept the human condition
One world in which we think and live, another we view with suspicion
Faced with the problem of time, we depend on hierarchy of power
To escape trials of reality, we’ve created this Ivory tower
C).
Take up the Wise One’s Burden, the war that lasts forever
Tear down this stained masquerade, a painful and failed endeavor
Reflect with heavy heart, on the house we’ve built on sand
Forgive the lies once told, and crude thoughts we now reprimand
D).
Take up the Wise One’s Burden, and solve the terminal soul
In memory, we last forever, but only as part of the whole
"To have faith is to lose your mind and to win God."
-The Sickness unto Death - 1849

Offline Sorginak

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2017, 07:30:03 PM »
I like it.  Thank you for sharing.

Offline Baruch

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2017, 09:53:57 PM »
As borrowed from Rudyard Kipling?  I am so triggered by 19th century British Imperialism ... not really.
שלום

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2017, 08:32:01 PM »
As borrowed from Rudyard Kipling?  I am so triggered by 19th century British Imperialism ... not really.

Yes, it was supposed to be satirical in the presentation.
"To have faith is to lose your mind and to win God."
-The Sickness unto Death - 1849

Offline Cavebear

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2017, 02:41:49 AM »
Just came across this silly poem I wrote a little while back after discovering Absurdism. It's a little embarrassing but I thought you guys might have a good laugh. Don't ask why it's missing the last two lines.

The Wise One’s Burden
A).
Take up the Wise One’s Burden, to question the vast unknown
Embrace the stark absurd, to interrogate the worlds we own
Release the world from meaning, yet revolt against despair
Purposeless the world may be, yet that is the burden we bear
B).
Take up the Wise One’s Burden, to accept the human condition
One world in which we think and live, another we view with suspicion
Faced with the problem of time, we depend on hierarchy of power
To escape trials of reality, we’ve created this Ivory tower
C).
Take up the Wise One’s Burden, the war that lasts forever
Tear down this stained masquerade, a painful and failed endeavor
Reflect with heavy heart, on the house we’ve built on sand
Forgive the lies once told, and crude thoughts we now reprimand
D).
Take up the Wise One’s Burden, and solve the terminal soul
In memory, we last forever, but only as part of the whole

Lost me at the 2nd sentence.  "World's We Own"?
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!  b 1950

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2017, 10:34:46 AM »
Lost me at the 2nd sentence.  "World's We Own"?

I interpret this as referring to the perspective world which we think in, versus the world around us which we live in. The interrogation might be belief systems, actions, etc. which are all fabricated within the mind.
"To have faith is to lose your mind and to win God."
-The Sickness unto Death - 1849

Offline Cavebear

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2017, 10:56:34 AM »
I interpret this as referring to the perspective world which we think in, versus the world around us which we live in. The interrogation might be belief systems, actions, etc. which are all fabricated within the mind.

Whew, deep!  And not joking.  How does the perspective world we think in differ from the world around us we live in?  I can guess but you have thought about it.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!  b 1950

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2017, 12:57:44 AM »
Whew, deep!  And not joking.  How does the perspective world we think in differ from the world around us we live in?  I can guess but you have thought about it.

Hmm, the way I see it the perspective world "creates" and the other world "exists". Think of it as a canvas and a painter. Your mind is the painter and paints whatever it feels on the canvas of the world thus constructing reality. So the world as we know it (America, religion, law, language) is really just a big piece of art on a previously blank canvas.

Take the language barrier for example.

In the perspective world, these symbols have meant something for English speakers. しかし、これらのシンボルは

Both sentences "exist", but if you don't understand Japanese this just means your perspective hasn't learned a "created" sense of meaning. Language to me is another form of mental painting using sound and writing and mutually agreeing on the meaning of otherwise random phonetics and symbols.

Even simple concepts like "up" and "down" are oriented according to perspective and wouldn't exist without a mind to experience and "create" the sense of up and down. I don't know if this made sense but it's how I understand the world of the Self and the Other.
"To have faith is to lose your mind and to win God."
-The Sickness unto Death - 1849

Offline Cavebear

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2017, 04:36:01 AM »
Hmm, the way I see it the perspective world "creates" and the other world "exists". Think of it as a canvas and a painter. Your mind is the painter and paints whatever it feels on the canvas of the world thus constructing reality. So the world as we know it (America, religion, law, language) is really just a big piece of art on a previously blank canvas.

Take the language barrier for example.

In the perspective world, these symbols have meant something for English speakers. しかし、これらのシンボルは

Both sentences "exist", but if you don't understand Japanese this just means your perspective hasn't learned a "created" sense of meaning. Language to me is another form of mental painting using sound and writing and mutually agreeing on the meaning of otherwise random phonetics and symbols.

Even simple concepts like "up" and "down" are oriented according to perspective and wouldn't exist without a mind to experience and "create" the sense of up and down. I don't know if this made sense but it's how I understand the world of the Self and the Other.

Some directions have no universal meaning.  Up and down in a on gravity situation, for example.  But right and left do.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!  b 1950

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2017, 03:57:34 PM »
Some directions have no universal meaning.  Up and down in a on gravity situation, for example.  But right and left do.

Right and Left have a universal meaning?
"To have faith is to lose your mind and to win God."
-The Sickness unto Death - 1849

Offline Baruch

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2017, 01:39:04 AM »
Right and Left have a universal meaning?

I think he got his grammar wrong, not his directions.  On Earth, gravity clearly defines a special direction.  And relative to the N/S poles ... so do the two geographical space dimensions.  It is only in empty space, far from Earth and gravity, that direction has no particular special meaning.

Right and left do have special meaning, for some quantum processes ... has to do with odd and even parity, so it isn't quite the same as your human hands, but a generalization of that, called chirality.
שלום

Offline Cavebear

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2017, 02:51:13 AM »
Right and Left have a universal meaning?

By definition...  Bi-lateral symmetry defines it.  I wouldn't matter to a starfish, of course. 
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!  b 1950

Offline Baruch

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2017, 01:28:31 PM »
By definition...  Bi-lateral symmetry defines it.  I wouldn't matter to a starfish, of course.

Odd number of arms or even?  That is the bi-lateral symmetry but still cut a starfish with an odd number of arms, and the two halves can't be matched.
שלום

Offline Cavebear

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2017, 01:35:14 PM »
Odd number of arms or even?  That is the bi-lateral symmetry but still cut a starfish with an odd number of arms, and the two halves can't be matched.

But a cut arm can grow a whole new starfish.  It's Quinteral symmatry?
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!  b 1950

Offline Baruch

Re: The Wise One's Burden
« Reply #14 on: September 12, 2017, 12:28:24 AM »
But a cut arm can grow a whole new starfish.  It's Quinteral symmatry?

Yes, one arm can grow a whole new starfish ... but the arm has to have part of the gut.  Kind of hard to regrow 80% of your body if you can't eat ;-(
שלום