Author Topic: Buddhism for atheists  (Read 555 times)

Offline aitm

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2017, 09:25:35 PM »
I've thought about converting back to Christianity just for the purpose of being accepted again. Like it or not, there is a bbenefit to religion. It helps people assemble and thrive as a cohesive unit and support system. It sucks being on the outside and being ostracized. I think becoming atheist was the worst thing that ever happened to me. I wish I could go back and not have the awakening I had that made me change my mind.
I have been an atheist for 50 odd years and I have never felt like it sucked. But I don't walk around waving a flag of atheism either. You can be yourself without having to demand the world recognize it.
A humans desire to live is exceeded only by their willingness to die for another. Even god cannot equal this magnificent sacrifice. No god has the right to judge them.-first tenant of the Panotheust

Offline Baruch

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2017, 11:30:25 PM »
I've thought about converting back to Christianity just for the purpose of being accepted again. Like it or not, there is a bbenefit to religion. It helps people assemble and thrive as a cohesive unit and support system. It sucks being on the outside and being ostracized. I think becoming atheist was the worst thing that ever happened to me. I wish I could go back and not have the awakening I had that made me change my mind.

You can't crawl back into your mother's womb ... you can't un-see things once seen.  Society is fine, except for the people.  I wouldn't describe my experience of Christian congregations as accepting ... just fellow Stepford wives.  At least in Buddhism, you can cut your own path.  Everyone here is non-conformist and usually anti-social ... so you are talking to the wrong people if you want acceptance.  I get plenty of socialization thru work, I don't need a congregation for that.  But I am recently back in synagogue ... but not because of the friendship ... it is more of a codependence thing, like a lot of families.

I have to keep my personal opinions mostly secret from the congregation, though being theist anyway, that doesn't amount to much.  The Holy Spirit was working hard last Friday night, I spontaneously agreed with a point the rabbi was making, from my own experience ... there is a confusing mixture of metaphysical beliefs between people that interferes with understanding each other, just like here.  The understanding of time in Biblical Hebrew is completely different than in English for instance.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2017, 11:34:54 PM by Baruch »
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Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2017, 10:59:23 PM »
Why are you a theist Baruch? You do realize that's dumb don't you?

Offline Shiranu

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2017, 11:18:13 PM »
No need for that toxicity. Theism is as much an expression of culture as it is "faith", and that is where B seems to come from. There is nothing stupid in being tied to your culture.
"Too curious flower, watching us pass, met death; Our hungry donkey." - Basho

"You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty." - Mahatma Gandhi

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2017, 11:40:08 PM »
It was a joke.

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2017, 11:41:11 PM »
Just to be clear, theism is the belief in one or more deity. It's not about being tied to your culture.

Offline Baruch

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #21 on: April 24, 2017, 12:25:28 AM »
Why are you a theist Baruch? You do realize that's dumb don't you?

Just trying to help you with Zen ...
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Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #22 on: April 24, 2017, 03:03:39 AM »
Just trying to help you with Zen ...
You know, I think most, if not all, atheists who are former believers have gone through that initial period when they felt angry about religion and wanted to see the destruction of religion. But I can say that I personally have passed that point, and I now see the religion as something that has, and will likely always be with us as a species. I see that there are many parts of religion that have helped us succeed and survive, and have helped us live comfortable and inspired lives. As someone who will likely be an atheist for the rest of my life, I'm more focused on extracting the parts of religion that I think are good (and even necessary) for our culture, and getting rid of dogma. Like I said before, I love church, and I can't imagine the culture I was raised in without the enrichment church brings to people's lives. I want nothing more than to keep that. Lets just get people on board with science, let's get people educated on philosophy, rhetoric, and how to think rationally, and lets let them have their rich spiritual lives too. It can be done. And I think it can actually be done easily if we could just get people on board.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2017, 03:23:34 AM by MyelinSheath »

Offline Cavebear

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #23 on: April 24, 2017, 04:43:51 AM »
Superstition is superstition; mysticism is mysticism.  All superstitions and mysticisms are alike.  If it involves anything unreal, it isn't good for humans.  Until we live in reality, we aren't advancing anywhere.
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead

Offline Baruch

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #24 on: April 24, 2017, 07:03:06 AM »
You know, I think most, if not all, atheists who are former believers have gone through that initial period when they felt angry about religion and wanted to see the destruction of religion. But I can say that I personally have passed that point, and I now see the religion as something that has, and will likely always be with us as a species. I see that there are many parts of religion that have helped us succeed and survive, and have helped us live comfortable and inspired lives. As someone who will likely be an atheist for the rest of my life, I'm more focused on extracting the parts of religion that I think are good (and even necessary) for our culture, and getting rid of dogma. Like I said before, I love church, and I can't imagine the culture I was raised in without the enrichment church brings to people's lives. I want nothing more than to keep that. Lets just get people on board with science, let's get people educated on philosophy, rhetoric, and how to think rationally, and lets let them have their rich spiritual lives too. It can be done. And I think it can actually be done easily if we could just get people on board.

There are some Unitarian/Universalist congregations that aren't anti-Christian.
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Offline Baruch

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #25 on: April 24, 2017, 07:04:17 AM »
Superstition is superstition; mysticism is mysticism.  All superstitions and mysticisms are alike.  If it involves anything unreal, it isn't good for humans.  Until we live in reality, we aren't advancing anywhere.

A is A, B is B ... all letters are alike.  If it involves any writing, it isn't good for humans.  Until we live in a wordless reality, we aren't achieving the silence of meditation ;-)
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Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2017, 10:20:34 AM »
You know, I think most, if not all, atheists who are former believers have gone through that initial period when they felt angry about religion and wanted to see the destruction of religion. But I can say that I personally have passed that point, and I now see the religion as something that has, and will likely always be with us as a species. I see that there are many parts of religion that have helped us succeed and survive, and have helped us live comfortable and inspired lives. As someone who will likely be an atheist for the rest of my life, I'm more focused on extracting the parts of religion that I think are good (and even necessary) for our culture, and getting rid of dogma. Like I said before, I love church, and I can't imagine the culture I was raised in without the enrichment church brings to people's lives. I want nothing more than to keep that. Lets just get people on board with science, let's get people educated on philosophy, rhetoric, and how to think rationally, and lets let them have their rich spiritual lives too. It can be done. And I think it can actually be done easily if we could just get people on board.
Actually, I have had that same set of feelings/thoughts; but I passed through them and am now back at hatred for and of religion.  What I mean is that I think the single most destructive force in every society is the hierarchy that grows up around organized religion.  And that hierarchy is what is destructive; it wants only to enhance that hierarchy and the individuals of that religion are only a means to that objective.  And that objective is to be reached and maintained at all costs.
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #27 on: April 24, 2017, 11:07:49 AM »
I'm not advocating superstition. I'm well aware of religion's harms. However, there are parts of religion which don't require belief in nonsense or adherence to dogma. I can tell you as someone from the south, going to church on Sunday is the best day of the week. You get up, put on some nice clothes, you drive out to church with your family, you get together, you sing songs, you express concern and love for each other, and you go home for food and hang out afterwards. Church is very enjoyable, and those parts of Christianity could be harnessed without carrying forth the preposterous beliefs.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2017, 11:10:51 AM by MyelinSheath »

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #28 on: April 24, 2017, 11:31:25 AM »
I'm not advocating superstition. I'm well aware of religion's harms. However, there are parts of religion which don't require belief in nonsense or adherence to dogma. I can tell you as someone from the south, going to church on Sunday is the best day of the week. You get up, put on some nice clothes, you drive out to church with your family, you get together, you sing songs, you express concern and love for each other, and you go home for food and hang out afterwards. Church is very enjoyable, and those parts of Christianity could be harnessed without carrying forth the preposterous beliefs.
Then what keeps you from it????
Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent,
Is he able but not willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able or willing?
Then why call him god?

Offline Baruch

Re: Buddhism for atheists
« Reply #29 on: April 24, 2017, 12:47:30 PM »
Actually, I have had that same set of feelings/thoughts; but I passed through them and am now back at hatred for and of religion.  What I mean is that I think the single most destructive force in every society is the hierarchy that grows up around organized religion.  And that hierarchy is what is destructive; it wants only to enhance that hierarchy and the individuals of that religion are only a means to that objective.  And that objective is to be reached and maintained at all costs.

Good thing you weren't a Catholic choir boy, right?
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