Author Topic: Simple Question...  (Read 4278 times)

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #15 on: September 04, 2013, 10:57:52 AM »
Quote from: "Solitary"
Quote from: "Doubtful_1"
I am not a Buddhist because I drink beer and yada yada yada, but I do love Buddha for his teachings and his unwillingness to speak of God, even when asked.



That was the point Buddha was making. He didn't say you "can't" drink intoxicating drinks, just avoid them so you have a clear mind. So drinking doesn't mean you can't be a Buddhist. Also, modern Buddhist schools have added drugs to that list of shall not's. Solitary

Then I don't know, maybe you COULD consider me a Buddhist. I believe he spoke the truth and I try to think like him. I don't meditate as much as I should though.

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #16 on: September 04, 2013, 10:06:07 PM »
If you just ACCEPT the Buddha's teachings as truth, you're not a Buddhist.  If you've investigated them, and FOUND them to be true, you may be.
Afflicting the comfortable for 65 years.
Science builds skyscrapers, faith flies planes into them.

Offline Aupmanyav

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #17 on: September 08, 2013, 05:01:52 AM »
I am told of a Buddha Bar where monks sell drinks.
"Brahma Satyam Jagan-mithya" (Brahman is the truth, the observed is an illusion)
"Sarve Khalu Idam Brahma" (All this here is Brahman)

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #18 on: October 12, 2013, 04:34:02 PM »
I am not, but don't stop believing, wink wink ;)
[youtube:3j2nw5wn][/youtube:3j2nw5wn]

Offline leo

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #19 on: October 12, 2013, 07:03:00 PM »
Whut?
Religion is Bullshit  . The winner of the last person to post wins thread .

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2013, 11:46:06 PM »
Quote from: "Validus"
So......am I the only Buddhist/Atheist around here?
maybe around here but I doubt it since there are over a half a billion or so around the world!

Offline Aupmanyav

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #21 on: October 13, 2013, 02:11:15 AM »
I am a hindu/atheist. I do not know our exact numbers, but there are lots of us.
"Brahma Satyam Jagan-mithya" (Brahman is the truth, the observed is an illusion)
"Sarve Khalu Idam Brahma" (All this here is Brahman)

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #22 on: November 06, 2013, 07:36:15 AM »
I admire the philosophy, i'm just reluctant to adopt it.  Not sure why.  It just doesn't seem right.  Something's missing.  

BTW, What does the swastika on the young man's head represent?

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #23 on: November 06, 2013, 10:28:10 AM »
I know a buddhist who eats meat and drinks, so I don't know. there seems to be enough variability between one sect and another that you can pretty much do what you want. Like every other religion.

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #24 on: November 06, 2013, 11:07:17 AM »
Quote from: "Jack89"
I admire the philosophy, i'm just reluctant to adopt it.  Not sure why.  It just doesn't seem right.  Something's missing.  

BTW, What does the swastika on the young man's head represent?


From the internet:
Hinduism, the two symbols represent the two forms of the creator god Brahma: facing right it represents the evolution of the universe (Pravritti), facing left it represents the involution of the universe (Nivritti). It is also seen as pointing in all four directions (north, east, south and west) and thus signifies stability and groundedness. Its use as a sun symbol can first be seen in its representation of the god Surya.

 The swastika is considered extremely holy and auspicious by all Hindus, and is regularly used to decorate items related to Hindu culture. It is used in all Hindu yantras and religious designs. Throughout the subcontinent of India, it can be seen on the sides of temples, religious scriptures, gift items, and letterheads. The Hindu god Ganesh is often shown sitting on a lotus flower on a bed of swastikas.

 The swastika is found all over Hindu temples, signs, altars, pictures and iconography where it is sacred. It is used in Hindu weddings, festivals, ceremonies, houses and doorways, clothing and jewelry, motor transport and even decorations on food items such as cakes and pastries. Among the Hindus of Bengal, it is common to see the name "swastika" (Bengali: ???????? sbastik) applied to a slightly different symbol, which has the same significance as the common swastika, and both symbols are used as auspicious signs. This symbol looks something like a stick figure of a human being.[17] "Swastika" (???????? Sbastik) is a common given name amongst Bengalis[18] and a prominent literary magazine in Kolkata (Calcutta) is called the Swastika.

 The Aum symbol is also sacred in Hinduism. While Aum is representative of a single primordial tone of creation, the Swastika is a pure geometrical mark and has no syllabic tone associated with it. The Swastika is one of the 108 symbols of Lord Vishnu and represents the sun's rays, without which there would be no life. Solitary
There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #25 on: November 06, 2013, 11:49:44 PM »

Offline Aupmanyav

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #26 on: November 08, 2013, 08:30:49 AM »
@ Solitary, excellent description. I did not know about left-handed Swastika, and nivritti, the dissolution.

Quote from: "Jack89"
BTW, What does the swastika on the young man's head represent?
Hindus have swastika at all happy occasions, first tonsure generally at the age of 1 to 3, sacred thread ceremony between ages of 7 to 11 (Yajnopavita, also accompanied by a tonsure), marriage, house warming, festivals, new year, ritual worship, etc. Swastika, for us, represents well-being and happiness. It is a tradition to put a swastika on a tonsured head, or the henna tattoo at the time or marriage, or religious observances, etc. Swastika is a part of our life. Never black, always in pleasing colours, red, orange, or yellow; and always right-handed, along with the four dots. The photograph is of a boy who is being given the sacred thread, emphasizing the continuation of the Hindu religious tradition. Here is my old avatara picture. That was for a child having his first tonsure (we call it 'chudakarman' or 'mundan'). My grandson is of that age and within six months, we will arrange for his 'mundan' accompanied with a grand party which will cost me some 5,000 dollars.

"Brahma Satyam Jagan-mithya" (Brahman is the truth, the observed is an illusion)
"Sarve Khalu Idam Brahma" (All this here is Brahman)

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2013, 10:30:33 AM »
Very cool, thanks for the explanation.

Offline Aupmanyav

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #28 on: November 09, 2013, 09:25:55 AM »
Nivritti, the final dissolution of the universe also is not bad. According to Hindu beliefs, it is part of the natural cycle, and after dissolution, there is always a new creation, new Gods, new Vedas, new Adams. What does not change is 'dharma', that being eternal. :)

Quote
.. a grand party which will cost me some 5,000 dollars.
The cost surely vary from one country to another, but this will suffice for some 150 guests that we hope will attend. Not a five-star hotel (one does not get good food at these five-star hotels, just the show).
"Brahma Satyam Jagan-mithya" (Brahman is the truth, the observed is an illusion)
"Sarve Khalu Idam Brahma" (All this here is Brahman)

Online Munch

Re: Simple Question...
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2014, 12:15:49 PM »
Buddhism always struck me as one of the very few religions that has something meaningful to it, it being about self and finding your own inner peace and following.
There was a Buddhist chap in my local town who came into the shop my mother worked at there,  and he always seemed a very relaxed and inviting guy to be around, so back then I considered it seemed some good came from at least a few religions.
Of course I could be wrong? I never studied the practice much just what I saw about on programs and forums.