Author Topic: Exoplanets  (Read 2328 times)

Offline Drew_2017 (OP)

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2017, 02:12:00 PM »
If life is discovered on other planets, the theist's story will change, as it always does.

Theism belief is that a Creator caused the universe and life to exist. There is no mandate from theism that life be located on earth only. Specific religions might be upset.
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
Albert Einstein

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2017, 03:07:02 PM »
Annelid is on the right track, though it fails to address the origin of the RNA itself. Here is the origin of the RNA itself:

6 May 2008 Chaitan (Photos by Carlos Guttierez)
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/05/photogalleries/volcano-photos/

First life was anaerobic. That is why the amino acids formed in the Miller-Urey volcanic spark experiment of 1959 included such things as beta cyanoalanine. Cyanide will indeed make human breathing problematic.

Offline Mr.Obvious

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2017, 04:58:10 PM »
Annelid is on the right track

Rank =/= name
You're the second newbie to make that mistake recently. :p

Welcome to the forum btw.
E = Mc²

In the end, we are all standing in the dark,
trying to figure out why we are here.
But let us not choose one direction
without proof of where it is headed.

Check your pocket for matches
so we can observe and learn together
as fast friends and relative idiots.

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #18 on: March 01, 2017, 05:30:07 PM »
A planet doesn't necessarily have to be in the Goldilocks zone, if it has enough self-generated heat to have liquid water underneath its surface, in order for it to be a life-bearing planet. There are planets and moons in our own solar system that have underground aquifers, or even oceans. That makes the chances of finding life a lot better than if only those in the special zone were considered.


But scientists don't have "faith" that we will find life "out there" because they know that just because a thing is possible, that doesn't mean it is actual. All of us will just have to wait and see what can be seen.
God Not Found
"Never criticize someone unless you've walked a mile in his shoes. Then when you criticize him at least you'll be a mile away - and you'll have his shoes."
Ray Magliozzi
"Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted at all."

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2017, 05:32:46 PM »
Humans are definitely not special.  A dolphin told me so.
Did the dolphin also thank you for all the fish?
God Not Found
"Never criticize someone unless you've walked a mile in his shoes. Then when you criticize him at least you'll be a mile away - and you'll have his shoes."
Ray Magliozzi
"Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted at all."

Online Baruch

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2017, 05:59:24 PM »
Annelid is on the right track, though it fails to address the origin of the RNA itself. Here is the origin of the RNA itself:

6 May 2008 Chaitan (Photos by Carlos Guttierez)
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/05/photogalleries/volcano-photos/

First life was anaerobic. That is why the amino acids formed in the Miller-Urey volcanic spark experiment of 1959 included such things as beta cyanoalanine. Cyanide will indeed make human breathing problematic.

Attended a lecture by Dr Cyril Ponnamperuma way back when.  He did research in early atmospheres.  Amino acids are also found in the nebular clouds.
שלום

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2017, 06:19:18 PM »
Yes, "Spinoza" is also on track, but since the word is not the thing, we chose "annelid" as the location of the enunciation we replied to. What did science call the name of the billions-of-years-old fossil worm from the iron deposits of Minnesota/Michigan? Perhaps a better idea is to use the number of the post when replying. Ambiguous is the evidence for glycine in space, recalling its unique folding feature vs. other amino acids.

Online Baruch

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #22 on: March 01, 2017, 07:24:46 PM »
Yes, "Spinoza" is also on track, but since the word is not the thing, we chose "annelid" as the location of the enunciation we replied to. What did science call the name of the billions-of-years-old fossil worm from the iron deposits of Minnesota/Michigan? Perhaps a better idea is to use the number of the post when replying. Ambiguous is the evidence for glycine in space, recalling its unique folding feature vs. other amino acids.

Worked on silicon based life form ideas when a wee sprout ... but 3d chemical structure wasn't right, non-planar.  Sorry, no Horta for you ;-(  I suspect other random permutation coding structures are possible, other than the DNA/RNA combination.  But I didn't get a grant to do that Dr Frankenstein biochemistry.  Also Los Alamos wasn't brilliant enough to hire me to help with the Human Genome project.  All that DNA testing they are selling, they just like collecting spit, and then make up the results ;-)
שלום

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #23 on: March 01, 2017, 07:44:28 PM »
Post #20: "We are aware of becoming atmosphere." (Hubertus Tellenbach, Melancholy). Post #22: Alzheimer's onset can occur as early as thirty years of age, and this in some accordance with the presenilin protein that can carry an alanine-to-valine polymorphism. We implicate glycine's unique folding capabilities in the first ever tumor found in chicken crystallin (eye), and early-atmosphere beta-cyanoalanine of Miller-Urey's volcanic spark to lack of oxygen in the birth canal of the Kennedy daughter's profound mental retardation and even more profound PTSD.

Online Baruch

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #24 on: March 01, 2017, 07:51:07 PM »
Good to meet you Mr Lovecraft.  I had your last post analyzed (please excuse) .... after one of mine in another string this evening was matched to Stephen King.  Shall we haunt this gothic web site together?  I hope we don't meet up with the writer who matches the dialog of Pennywise.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2017, 07:52:51 PM by Baruch »
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Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #25 on: March 01, 2017, 08:05:58 PM »
Radioastronomer Hans Deeg has studied exoplanets for decades. When riding with him out to the Very Large Array one night in New Mexico, my question was "Is there any kind of coherent signals coming from space?" His answer was "No, there's only noise."

Online Baruch

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #26 on: March 01, 2017, 08:08:14 PM »
Radioastronomer Hans Deeg has studied exoplanets for decades. When riding with him out to the Very Large Array one night in New Mexico, my question was "Is there any kind of coherent signals coming from space?" His answer was "No, there's only noise."

Haha ... you were talking to an alien shapeshifter.  Too bad it didn't shape shift into a beautiful woman.
שלום

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #27 on: March 01, 2017, 08:23:09 PM »
#26: "It" did happen to marry a beautiful woman. Hans Deeg is now in the Canary Islands, and you can write to him if you wish. At the time Hans was investigating Red Dwarfs by looking out through Draco. NASA Astrobiology's Baruch Blumberg has done some experiments in space on mammary gland proteins in sub-gravity, but he was really fascinated by the fact that the hepatitis B virus, after assembly, then (returns [italics]) to the endoplasmic reticulum! A confirmed glycine finding in space is sorely needed, though in the meantime, there's the lunar surface, which is a most reasonable stepping stone to Mars. Since the Japanese are well ahead, perhaps a robot-manned expedition. Of course, a robot "doctor" would be most necessary.

Offline Drew_2017 (OP)

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #28 on: March 01, 2017, 09:33:08 PM »
A planet doesn't necessarily have to be in the Goldilocks zone, if it has enough self-generated heat to have liquid water underneath its surface, in order for it to be a life-bearing planet. There are planets and moons in our own solar system that have underground aquifers, or even oceans. That makes the chances of finding life a lot better than if only those in the special zone were considered.


But scientists don't have "faith" that we will find life "out there" because they know that just because a thing is possible, that doesn't mean it is actual. All of us will just have to wait and see what can be seen.

I agree about the Goldilocks zone this is why they might find life on moons around Saturn and its relatively close to us.

The word faith has gotten a bad rap and become a pejorative term meaning belief in something with either no evidence or all the evidence against it. In the real world we put faith in things because they have been reliable. We have faith in chairs to support our weight precisely because for the most part they always do. Scientists have confidence in finding life because naturalism kind of demands it. According to naturalism all this is by chance and if it happened on earth then it should happen elsewhere.
 
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
Albert Einstein

Online Cavebear

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #29 on: March 02, 2017, 12:36:57 AM »
Well drew it's science. These are the building blocks of life and since 2008 which when this article is from, much more has been discovered. It is a process of learning, trial and error.

Also we can't forget life took billions of years to evolve into what it is to day. So no, no one in science is just claiming that life came from nothing or that it just suddenly popped into existence. these replicating molecules sure they are not alive but they are the precursors of life.  They explain how life came to be with naturalistic explanations.

So do we have all the answers right this very moment? Of course not! Science is an ever growing field and we learn more and more as we go. We will get there it's only a matter of time.

So I guess it depends on what you consider frustrating. What ? Would you have them through up there hands and say "f it I can't do it!" I quit or I give up it this proves a creator did it?

When will you realize that science is so close and religion is so far behind it's also a matter of time before Most people start abandoning religion. The religious will be able to deny the evidence against their teachings no more.

More and more planets get discovered, and as our techniques are refined, we see planets more similar to Earth. 
Atheist born, atheist bred.  And when I die, atheist dead!