Author Topic: Exoplanets  (Read 2073 times)

Offline Drew_2017 (OP)

Exoplanets
« on: February 26, 2017, 06:54:39 PM »
I think this research is really exciting there is a distinct possibility we may find evidence of life elsewhere in my lifetime. On a side note, what's interesting is the confidence scientists seem to express that life will be found. They seem to assume if an exoplanet is in the 'Goldilocks' zone with earth like conditions it should result in life occurring. Is that thinking justified considering we don't actually know how life processes began?

“That doesn’t prove they're definitely capable of supporting of life,” he said. After all, one or two of the three planets could be like Venus in our solar system, which has nasty conditions. But still, three planets is better than two or one, odds-wise. “With three bites at the cherry, you have to be optimistic that there’s a good shot one of them has the potential to be Earth-like.”

He added: “As far as we know right now, I’d say there are no show-stoppers to stop life from living on these worlds.”
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
Albert Einstein

Offline Baruch

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2017, 07:44:09 PM »
We already know there is water and amino acids in the nebula clouds beyond any planet.  So detecting water and amino acids in a planet spectrum won't be much of a surprise.  But if the alien life is like dinosaurs, it will be hard to detect their radio signals ;-)
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Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2017, 07:57:38 PM »
The more we look, the more Earth-like planets we will find. I doubt that any of these three that you mention have life on them, but I'm certain that there is at least one other planet in the universe that has life on it.
"Birds born in a cage think flying is an illness." - Alejandro Jodorowsky

Offline Ro3bert

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2017, 06:29:03 PM »
I am either mathematician nor a statistician but with billions and billions of galaxies out there I think there is almost a certainty there are many planets capable of sustaining life. If there is life on this planet then the probability that there are many more is almost a certainty. It just doesn't make sense that there wouldn't be others. The non-statistician in me can't imagine only one planet sustaining life in the whole universe.

Offline Sorginak

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2017, 06:34:20 PM »
Theistic humans are especially fond of thinking this is the only planet capable of sustaining life because they like to think they are special.  If there is life on other planets, they have to either admit that they are not special unto their god or that god does not exist. 

Offline Mr.Obvious

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2017, 06:38:21 PM »
There being life out there? Highly likely.
Us finding it? Highly unlikely.

To the best of my current understanding.
E = Mc²

In the end, we are all standing in the dark,
trying to figure out why we are here.
But let us not choose one direction
without proof of where it is headed.

Check your pocket for matches
so we can observe and learn together
as fast friends and relative idiots.

Offline Drew_2017 (OP)

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2017, 08:02:36 PM »
I am either mathematician nor a statistician but with billions and billions of galaxies out there I think there is almost a certainty there are many planets capable of sustaining life. If there is life on this planet then the probability that there are many more is almost a certainty. It just doesn't make sense that there wouldn't be others. The non-statistician in me can't imagine only one planet sustaining life in the whole universe.

I don't think we are taking into account how vexing it is to figure out exactly how life got started on earth, the only known place. If we could duplicate the process I think we'd have a better grip on the odds of it developing elsewhere. As it is now, they seem to think if a planet has water and is in the same zone as our planet life will spontaneously occur.

Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
Albert Einstein

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2017, 08:39:23 PM »
I don't think we are taking into account how vexing it is to figure out exactly how life got started on earth, the only known place. If we could duplicate the process I think we'd have a better grip on the odds of it developing elsewhere. As it is now, they seem to think if a planet has water and is in the same zone as our planet life will spontaneously occur.

Water just means that it is possible for life to occur. Presumably (and this could turn out not to be true), life requires water to survive. And the water has to be in liquid form, not frozen as it is in many places. So if there's water on a planet, it has a better chance of having life than most of the rest of the universe.
"Birds born in a cage think flying is an illness." - Alejandro Jodorowsky

Offline doorknob

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2017, 08:57:32 PM »
I don't think we are taking into account how vexing it is to figure out exactly how life got started on earth, the only known place. If we could duplicate the process I think we'd have a better grip on the odds of it developing elsewhere. As it is now, they seem to think if a planet has water and is in the same zone as our planet life will spontaneously occur.

Um you may not know how life got started but science has already demonstrated how life came into existence. Just ask how single celled organism began to come to life. There are replicating molecules that started the chain into simple proteins and so on. That is no longer a mystery. well you can read the article your self right here.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16382-artificial-molecule-evolves-in-the-lab/

You can look up more one how one celled organism became multi cellular after that it should be pretty obvious how animals and insect evolved down the line. 

actually now I'm more interested I'll see you down the rabbit hole.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2017, 09:06:45 PM by doorknob »

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2017, 10:14:38 PM »
Theistic humans are especially fond of thinking this is the only planet capable of sustaining life because they like to think they are special.  If there is life on other planets, they have to either admit that they are not special unto their god or that god does not exist.

If life is discovered on other planets, the theist's story will change, as it always does.
"Birds born in a cage think flying is an illness." - Alejandro Jodorowsky

Offline Baruch

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2017, 05:10:58 AM »
Theistic humans are especially fond of thinking this is the only planet capable of sustaining life because they like to think they are special.  If there is life on other planets, they have to either admit that they are not special unto their god or that god does not exist.

Humans are definitely not special.  A dolphin told me so.
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Offline Drew_2017 (OP)

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2017, 09:52:07 AM »
Um you may not know how life got started but science has already demonstrated how life came into existence. Just ask how single celled organism began to come to life. There are replicating molecules that started the chain into simple proteins and so on. That is no longer a mystery. well you can read the article your self right here.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16382-artificial-molecule-evolves-in-the-lab/

You can look up more one how one celled organism became multi cellular after that it should be pretty obvious how animals and insect evolved down the line. 

actually now I'm more interested I'll see you down the rabbit hole.

I read the article and I don't think they attempted to mimic early earth conditions to demonstrate how life came about naturally unless the early earth was capable of making test tubes.

Rather than start with RNA enzymes – ribozymes – present in other organisms, Joyce’s team created its own molecule from scratch, called R3C. It performed a single function: stitching two shorter RNA molecules together to create a clone of itself.

Further lab tinkering made this molecule better at copying itself, but this is not the same as bringing it to life. It self-replicated to a point, but eventually clogged up in shapes that could no longer sew RNA pieces together. “It was a real dog,” Joyce says.


I believe the real point was to simulate early life and show how natural selection would occur in a tightly controlled environment.
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
Albert Einstein

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2017, 12:03:17 PM »
If life is discovered on other planets, the theist's story will change, as it always does.
This quandary comes up a lot on Christian forums.  Some will deny the possibility outright, but some are prepared to adapt their views accordingly.  One explanation I've read is that life on other planets didn't have original sin and therefore don't have a Jesus figure.  Alternatively, maybe they had original sin and had some sort of alien Jesus figure to get them back on track.  Regrettably, I didn't have the presence of mind to ask if the alien prophet Aun'Va should be considered an Abrahamic prophet.  I'd imagine it'd be a little jarring to walk into church and see a new face on the stained glass windows, lol.

Some of these people are even prepared to try to convert aliens or to syncretize alien beliefs with their own.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2017, 12:06:58 PM by Hydra009 »

Offline doorknob

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2017, 12:10:51 PM »
Well drew it's science. These are the building blocks of life and since 2008 which when this article is from, much more has been discovered. It is a process of learning, trial and error.

Also we can't forget life took billions of years to evolve into what it is to day. So no, no one in science is just claiming that life came from nothing or that it just suddenly popped into existence. these replicating molecules sure they are not alive but they are the precursors of life.  They explain how life came to be with naturalistic explanations.

So do we have all the answers right this very moment? Of course not! Science is an ever growing field and we learn more and more as we go. We will get there it's only a matter of time.

So I guess it depends on what you consider frustrating. What ? Would you have them through up there hands and say "f it I can't do it!" I quit or I give up it this proves a creator did it?

When will you realize that science is so close and religion is so far behind it's also a matter of time before Most people start abandoning religion. The religious will be able to deny the evidence against their teachings no more.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2017, 12:14:14 PM by doorknob »

Offline Baruch

Re: Exoplanets
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2017, 01:01:20 PM »
This quandary comes up a lot on Christian forums.  Some will deny the possibility outright, but some are prepared to adapt their views accordingly.  One explanation I've read is that life on other planets didn't have original sin and therefore don't have a Jesus figure.  Alternatively, maybe they had original sin and had some sort of alien Jesus figure to get them back on track.  Regrettably, I didn't have the presence of mind to ask if the alien prophet Aun'Va should be considered an Abrahamic prophet.  I'd imagine it'd be a little jarring to walk into church and see a new face on the stained glass windows, lol.

Some of these people are even prepared to try to convert aliens or to syncretize alien beliefs with their own.

Sci-fi Christians are definitely evangelical ... since The Martian Chronicles.  Babylon 5 was another.
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