Author Topic: multiple personalities or extraordinary imagination  (Read 210 times)

Offline randomvim (OP)

multiple personalities or extraordinary imagination
« on: January 12, 2017, 04:04:31 PM »
so two things im curious about.
1. do you or someone you know have multiple personalities aka DID (dissasociative identity disorder)?
Im curious about day to day activities and or experiences. what do you think of or have thought about in regards to this mental uniqueness?

2. have you been with  a person who has or are you someone who has boarderline  personality disorder?
http://www.m.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/tc/borderline-personality-disorder-topic-overview

please no personal information that may violate your privacy. 

Re: multiple personalities or extraordinary imagination
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2017, 04:15:53 PM »
Nah, none of that stuff with me. I did read a very good book, long ago, called The Minds of Billy Milligan. Also, there's The Three Faces of Eve.
God Not Found
"It is not God that is worshipped but the group or authority that claims to speak in His name. Sin becomes disobedience to authority not violation of integrity."
Radhakrishnan, Sir Sarvepalli

Offline Baruch

Re: multiple personalities or extraordinary imagination
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2017, 07:42:04 PM »
so two things im curious about.
1. do you or someone you know have multiple personalities aka DID (dissasociative identity disorder)?
Im curious about day to day activities and or experiences. what do you think of or have thought about in regards to this mental uniqueness?

2. have you been with  a person who has or are you someone who has boarderline  personality disorder?
http://www.m.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/tc/borderline-personality-disorder-topic-overview

please no personal information that may violate your privacy.

That is a very interesting question, touching on my own theology.  Some would say that the "unified personality" is a construct, the consensus of an unconscious community of sub-personalities.  Others claim that multiple personality disorder doesn't exist.  I have never known such a person, but absence doesn't prove non-existence, only rarity.  Hence a monotheist G-d would be unique enough to qualify as "most rare".  Some people don't believe in the unconscious mind, some even don't believe in the conscious mind.  Psychology does mean "study of the soul" ... hence it is akin to theology.  Sigmund Freud was a secularized Jewish exorcist.  And Carl Jung was the Christian counterparty.

The WebMD definition seems to point to a corner of the Autism spectrum ... in which case I definitely don't know one.  WebMD seems to believe that Dissociative Personality Disorder is real (aka Multiple personalty).

In my own case, I do have extraordinary imagination, but I don't match the symptoms that are described for either case.  I don't have "switching" for example.  In primitive religion theory, I could be described as a shaman ... which is a person who had a mental illness, but got well, but in a non-cultural normal way.
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Offline randomvim (OP)

Re: multiple personalities or extraordinary imagination
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2017, 01:51:41 AM »
That is a very interesting question, touching on my own theology.  Some would say that the "unified personality" is a construct, the consensus of an unconscious community of sub-personalities.  Others claim that multiple personality disorder doesn't exist.  I have never known such a person, but absence doesn't prove non-existence, only rarity.  Hence a monotheist G-d would be unique enough to qualify as "most rare".  Some people don't believe in the unconscious mind, some even don't believe in the conscious mind.  Psychology does mean "study of the soul" ... hence it is akin to theology.  Sigmund Freud was a secularized Jewish exorcist.  And Carl Jung was the Christian counterparty.

The WebMD definition seems to point to a corner of the Autism spectrum ... in which case I definitely don't know one.  WebMD seems to believe that Dissociative Personality Disorder is real (aka Multiple personalty).

In my own case, I do have extraordinary imagination, but I don't match the symptoms that are described for either case.  I don't have "switching" for example.  In primitive religion theory, I could be described as a shaman ... which is a person who had a mental illness, but got well, but in a non-cultural normal way.
intruiging and rare reply. for your imagination, would you say you share discussions with "yourself" or other "people" that which you construct in your mind?

do you imagine other people or think about how another you might contribute to society/ hamdle a situation?

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Offline Baruch

Re: multiple personalities or extraordinary imagination
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2017, 07:07:26 AM »
intruiging and rare reply. for your imagination, would you say you share discussions with "yourself" or other "people" that which you construct in your mind?

do you imagine other people or think about how another you might contribute to society/ hamdle a situation?

Sent from my LG-K330 using Tapatalk

I don't think about contributing to society, I do contribute to society.  I am not a Snowflake ;-)  Aside from being a student, I have contributed to society for 40 years.  I haven't hugged any trees lately, but I am not against that ... but I have a brown thumb ;-(

OK, here is my experience and my cogitation over it.  I do think that everything is connected to everything else, that every human is connected to every human.  Like those desert plants in the Mohave.  Individuality is relative, not absolute.  So what is a night dream, what is a day dream?  A small breakdown in the notion of individuality.  I don't privilege ordinary consciousness, though that is the most pragmatic aspect of experience.  Day dreaming is a conscious excursion from ordinary mentality, that can be useful for thinking outside the box, just don't do it while driving ;-)  I have yet to see anyone successfully drive a car, while asleep (though there are jokes about it).  But REM and Deep sleep seem to be both necessary for their own reasons.  When I am in Deep sleep that would be the true unconscious.  When I am dreaming, that seems to be an intermediate state ... though for myself and others, one's identity, physicality, sexuality and rarely ... species ... is fluid.  Most dreams seem to be in worlds not unlike our own, but not the same world as ours.  A shaman would be someone who can experience that while awake, in a state of trance, as a liturgy for a paying client.  I can't do that myself, but I do experience vivid dreams, and rarely those are about this world perhaps, but in past times.  I don't agree with reincarnation ... but I do think that our sense of what place and time we are in .. is fluid.  If I am not really myself while dreaming, then I can't conclude that past time dreams are memories.  In the wider world of experience, I don't see any reason why I should assume that time is linear or even circular.

So while my conscious experience reinforces conventional notions of reality, daydreams and night dreams undermine it.  A person who was fully unconscious all the time, or who was in a night dream state (superimposed on the normal consciousness) would be a highly dysfunctional person of course.  Someone who is outside the boundaries or normality, but not totally dysfunctional, have traditional roles in primitive societies that we lack in our so called modernity.  Just as gay men had roles in the Lakota tribe, but don't have those roles today, thanks to Christian interference.  I would suggest, and measurements of people in New Guinea demonstrate ... that the average IQ is less than it was in the Stone Age ... and I would add that probably we have less mental health now than then, because our lives and environment were more harmonious.

On conversations .. no I don't have them.  My multiple personality if you will, is extended rather than internalized ... though I am not a solipsist.  In some respects I consider you and I to be the same person, with routine skipping.  Hence Brahman vs Atman.  I understand some people do have these conversations, involuntarily.  I would expect though, that novelists do have them, bidirectionally, as part of their writing technique ... but that would be voluntary ;-)
« Last Edit: January 13, 2017, 07:11:06 AM by Baruch »
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Offline Baruch

Re: multiple personalities or extraordinary imagination
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2017, 01:22:10 PM »
http://www.newsroom.co.nz/2017/01/13/mental-health/

An interesting view of mental health
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