Author Topic: Tesla Automated Car Fatality  (Read 1897 times)

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #15 on: July 01, 2016, 11:18:44 PM »
Good point.
Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false and by the rulers as useful

Offline doorknob

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #16 on: July 02, 2016, 02:07:20 PM »
I don't want an automated car. I'm a control freak and I want control over my car not some computer. Computers make mistakes too and malfunction at times. Nothing is perfect.

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #17 on: July 02, 2016, 07:38:31 PM »
Driverless car drivers are STILL SUPPOSED TO PAY ATTENTION?!   How's that working RIGHT NOW with non automated cars?   DDOOHH!!!   

There just might be a flaw in that admonision.  You know darn well; everything outlandish, under the sun, that can be done in an automated car; will be done.  As long as the tech works; I guess it doesn't matter................................until.................................the tech doesn't work.  BAH!!  Why worry; I've never had anything mechanical or electronic break down on me!    :lolhitting:

Offline Hijiri Byakuren

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Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2016, 08:12:33 PM »
Yup, this will sure put the brakes on automated cars; because as we all know, no one has ever been killed by a manned vehicle. Nope, no sir.

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #19 on: July 02, 2016, 09:21:25 PM »
I don't want an automated car. I'm a control freak and I want control over my car not some computer. Computers make mistakes too and malfunction at times. Nothing is perfect.
While I understand the desire to maintain personal control over the situation, there are plenty of instances where personal control is given up for the sake of expedience and reliability.  Stepping on a plane is a good example of that.  As a passenger, you have zero control over  whether that bird stays in the air.  And what's more, the pilots rarely exercise direct control, either.  Much of the flight is on autopilot - control is transferred to a machine that automatically and reliability plots the course.  And while psychologically, being on a plane can be a difficult experience, statistically, it's very safe.

Driverless cars feature not just that same kind of psychological unease but a major change to a part of our daily life, which never goes over well.  Resistance to that is understandable.  But statistically, it's much, much safer.  We're talking about a 90% decrease in traffic fatalities - 30,000 fatalities a year to roughly 3,000.  And there are other benefits - insurance savings, less traffic congestion (faster travel times), more leisure time.  Less trouble with the law too, since driving infractions are pretty much impossible.  The benefits are so massive that they outweigh any psychological unease.  I'd even argue that looking at this as a loss of control is a bad way of looking at it.  It's relief from a burdensome chore.  Instead, you get to watch movies or read books (or browse AF) during those long and previously tedious car trips.  At least, in the not too distant future when the implementation improves to the point where that's possible.

Decades from now, we'll look at old movies featuring manual cars and be astounded that we ever lived that way.  Just think about it from a martian's perspective - hopping in vehicle, navigating traffic, sitting behind a slowpoke, being tailgated, getting cut off, narrowly avoiding a blindspot lane-changer, pulling to the side to let an ambulance go by, seeing a high-speed police chase, seeing someone's car get t-boned at an intersection - imagine what that must look like from the outside.  Even something as mundane as waiting for a light will seem strange in the future.  And personally, I can't wait for that future.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2016, 09:42:39 PM by Hydra009 »

Online Shiranu

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #20 on: July 02, 2016, 10:09:42 PM »
Quote
It's relief from a burdensome chore.

Speak for yourself... I love driving.
"Too curious flower, watching us pass, met death; Our hungry donkey." - Basho

"You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty." - Mahatma Gandhi

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #21 on: July 02, 2016, 10:38:36 PM »
Speak for yourself... I love driving.
Oh yeah, it's a blast.


Offline SGOS (OP)

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #22 on: July 03, 2016, 07:18:32 AM »
I loved to drive when I was young, and I still do for short periods, but generally speaking I'd have to say having to drive the car is not my first choice.  Of course, this has nothing to do with the safety of cars.  That is an entirely different issue.

When debating auto safety, we should be cautious to avoid a logical fallacy, for which there is still no name that I can think of.  Let's call it the argument from perfection:  "That can never work because it will always be flawed."  For one thing, if that is the standard, then we would have to admit that allowing drivers to drive manually will never work.

If the goal is to reduce risks, that can only be determined statistically.  We can't just think an answer.  We have to measure to find out which causes fewer problems.  This doesn't disqualify the "argument from personal satisfaction."  We can justify driving for personal reasons too, but let's not confuse that with safety.

Offline doorknob

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #23 on: July 03, 2016, 08:10:33 AM »
My point wasn't that human drivers are safer that is actually yet to be seen. My point was that NOTHING is perfect. I've never had an accident. Don't take MY right to drive manually away! Accidents will still happen regardless of human or automated drivers and which is safer is a moot point since automated cars are still in the works. Right now a computer has not been safer or as efficient as a human driver. When that day comes I still want the option to drive. But no doubt people with this opinion despite the fact that I've never had an accident and manage to avoid them on a regular basis my right to drive will be taken away by people with said opinion.

Like I said I'm a control freak I want control over my car!
« Last Edit: July 03, 2016, 08:13:08 AM by doorknob »

Offline SGOS (OP)

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #24 on: July 03, 2016, 09:20:44 AM »
Like I said I'm a control freak I want control over my car!

You can get a Saint Christopher medal or a Jesus statue for your dash board.  That way you can control the car, but still be protected.  It's amazing what a simple statue of Jesus, molded out of ordinary plastic (and made in China to boot), can do for you when you drive your car.  It significantly ups your odds and they only cost $4.99.  I once bought one for a dollar at a wrecking yard.

Offline SGOS (OP)

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #25 on: July 03, 2016, 09:48:22 AM »
Here's a Jesus on a spring for your dashboard from Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/Accoutrements-11093-Dashboard-Jesus/dp/B000CIS34U/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1467552467&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=plastiic+jesus


Partial list of reviews from Amazon Customers.  There are lots more at the site.  Even some of the 5 star reviews are a riot

Quote
Showing 1-10 of 17 reviews(1 star). Show all reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars
Disappeared after three days
By E V January 10, 2015
I would definitely not buy this again. The figure itself was fine when it first arrived, but three days after I put him on my dashboard he mysteriously disappeared. The car was locked at the time. Has not been seen since.

1.0 out of 5 stars
Cheaper than a locksmith
By C H January 30, 2014
I bought this because I keep leaving my keys in the ignition and locking myself out. So hoping the spring stretches long enough for Him to unlock the door for me next time. If He does, I'll give this review more stars
1.0 out of 5 stars
We're in Texas here, not Canaan man...
By X March 23, 2015


Big mistake putting this guy in the car. I always carry a water bottle in the car for refreshment, and got into alot of trouble when I was pulled over for speeding after he changed the water I was drinking to wine. Maybe he thought that would be funny or something. Buried him in the backyard when I got home from that; he seems to have disappeared from the ground a few days later.

1.0 out of 5 stars
Oh God, Loaves and Fishes
By S S  February 17, 2015


Everything was great until I got hungry and stopped for a Fish Sandwich. Suddenly my backseat started to fill with buns and fish patties. Then, the front seat started to fill. Then I ran off the road because I couldn't see or steer from all the damn loaves and fishes. To top it off, my soda turned into wine, so that when the cops showed up, I got a DUI.

On a side note, can anyone recommend a good upholstery cleaner that removes the smell of tuna from a car?


.... You would think after His 3 day feat, He could at least get to my po box within 6 weeks ....

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #26 on: July 03, 2016, 01:49:33 PM »
When debating auto safety, we should be cautious to avoid a logical fallacy, for which there is still no name that I can think of.  Let's call it the argument from perfection:  "That can never work because it will always be flawed."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nirvana_fallacy (the argument that a proposed solution should be rejected because it doesn't completely solve the problem.)

Online Shiranu

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #27 on: July 03, 2016, 01:52:57 PM »
Question; How will these cars find directions in places with absolutely zero internet connection (or on areas like military bases where the maps of restricted)? As someone who has spent alot of time out in the middle of absolute nowhere... how does the direction service work when you are no longer in civilization?
"Too curious flower, watching us pass, met death; Our hungry donkey." - Basho

"You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty." - Mahatma Gandhi

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #28 on: July 03, 2016, 02:05:32 PM »
My point wasn't that human drivers are safer that is actually yet to be seen. My point was that NOTHING is perfect. I've never had an accident. Don't take MY right to drive manually away! Accidents will still happen regardless of human or automated drivers and which is safer is a moot point since automated cars are still in the works. Right now a computer has not been safer or as efficient as a human driver. When that day comes I still want the option to drive. But no doubt people with this opinion despite the fact that I've never had an accident and manage to avoid them on a regular basis my right to drive will be taken away by people with said opinion.

Like I said I'm a control freak I want control over my car!
I could've sworn I addressed this earlier.  Like I said before, people are naturally resistant to major changes to daily life and particularly to loss of control (although this loss of control is perfectly normal and acceptable in other contexts, like boarding a plane).  But there are such massive advantages to driverless cars that we'd be nuts to not implement it.  Undoubtedly, there will be people crying bloody murder over this, but that's what always happens when there are major changes in how people do things.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2016, 02:11:49 PM by Hydra009 »

Re: Tesla Automated Car Fatality
« Reply #29 on: July 03, 2016, 02:10:46 PM »
Question; How will these cars find directions in places with absolutely zero internet connection (or on areas like military bases where the maps of restricted)? As someone who has spent alot of time out in the middle of absolute nowhere... how does the direction service work when you are no longer in civilization?
http://www.alphr.com/cars/7038/how-do-googles-self-driving-cars-work

"Externally, the car has a rear-mounted aerial that receives geolocation information from GPS satellites, and an ultrasonic sensor on one of the rear wheels that monitors the car’s movements.

Internally, the car has altimeters, gyroscopes and a tachometer (a rev counter) to give finer measurements on the car’s position. These combine to give the car the highly accurate data needed to operate safely.

No single sensor is responsible for making Google's self-driving car work. GPS data, for example, is not accurate enough to keep the car on the road, let alone in the correct lane. Instead, the driverless car uses data from all eight sensors, interpreted by Google's software, to keep you safe and get you from A to B."