Atheistforums.com

Arts and Entertainment => Hobbies and Photos => Topic started by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 13, 2016, 05:49:07 PM

Title: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 13, 2016, 05:49:07 PM
Might as well start a thread for the topic..
So I'm fixin to make a rocking chair based on the design of the chairs here except instead of the Walmart method of screwing crap together I'm trying to decide what types of joints to use. I'll probably use a few different types of wood, maple and perhaps oak,but figuring out which joints to use where is kind of stumping me right now..

Any suggestions from you other wood workers out there?

(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160213_160949.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 13, 2016, 05:53:09 PM
Oh yeah..finished the towel rack.. I used some danish oil and topped with linseed oil.. Turned out ok..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160213_143433.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 13, 2016, 07:35:57 PM
Watch "The Patriot" (Mel Gibson) first.

Plans available online.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: kilodelta on February 13, 2016, 08:02:18 PM
Nice rack.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on February 13, 2016, 08:34:28 PM


Any suggestions from you other wood workers out there?
Well the design of it kind of begs for mortice and tenon joinery. At least for most of those joints. Of course mortice and tenon isn't easy. Easier with the right tools ($$$$) but still not easy.

Forstner drill bits and wood dowels would also work for most of it and would be easier than mortice and tenon while still a nice upgrade in craftsmanship over just screwing it together.

A pocket screw jig would also work and do a nice job if you happen to have one and you're not opposed to cheating a bit (i.e. taking the easy way out) on your joinery. I have the $100+ Kreg pocket jig kit and I use it all the time. Well worth the investment.

But yeah, a set of forstner bits and dowels would work and wouldn't be too expensive. For the back, you could run a dado in the top and bottom pieces with either a router table or dado blade in a table saw, then set the spindles and use flush insert pieces to fill the gaps in the dado between the spindles.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: stromboli on February 13, 2016, 09:29:32 PM
http://chairplandiy.com/

 I built some Adirondack chairs from a kit years ago. What I did was buy 1 cheap kit and use it as a pattern for the parts, with better material (Redwood). You could try that, but another approach is just go to where they sell fine furniture and measure the chairs and take pictures. If you use mortise and tenon/tongue and groove joinery, like Johan said, really requires special tools, unless you are really into careful chisel work and a lot of patience. The problem with that is you slip up and you can ruin a piece of wood. I am pretty well set up tool wise, with a table saw and most of the necessary hand tools including Forstner bits if I chose to do that.

I'm planning to build a picnic table this summer but don't have a pattern or style of table picked out yet. If I build one I'll put pictures on here.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 14, 2016, 11:54:05 PM
I'm ok with the chisels for the tenon and mortises.. Yep, easy to mess up, but the joints fit nicely usually.. The only part that I really have reservations about is the seat which I may carve out with an angle grinder and a set of KA chainsaw wheels IF I can get up the nerve to do it without chopping off more body parts.. I have some forstner bits so I'm good to go there.. I really need to work on getting my chisels sharper.. They're fairly sharp, but I need them much sharper.  I'm going to get a leather strop sooner or later..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: chill98 on February 15, 2016, 12:05:29 PM
.... without chopping off more body parts.. .. I really need to work on getting my chisels sharper.. They're fairly sharp, but I need them much sharper.
You've already chopped off Body Parts?!   
 Eeek... 
Are you sure you want to go sharper?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 15, 2016, 01:25:39 PM
Dull chisels split wood instead of shaving it.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: stromboli on February 15, 2016, 01:28:49 PM
Dull chisels split wood instead of shaving it.

^ this.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 15, 2016, 01:34:30 PM
I'm currently at about 400 grit on my chisels and know that will dull rather quickly and does.. I saw some diamond plate on ebay cheap 400, 800 and 1200. I'm not sure what difference, if anything beyond 1200 will really make, but I don't suppose 18000 grit can hurt, but I do have other things to do with my life than just sharpen chisels..lol
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 15, 2016, 01:40:55 PM
You've already chopped off Body Parts?!   
 Eeek... 
Are you sure you want to go sharper?
Cutting them isn't nearly as bad as ripping them.. I'm missing about 1/4 inch from my finger.. That happened about 2 weeks ago. Yesterday I banged the same finger into a vise and it hurt a hell of a lot more than when I first cut it.. I could feel the tip of my finger hurt all the way down to my little toes.. Somehow I have the feeling that my finger tip is going to give me a lot of grief in the years to come..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 15, 2016, 01:46:06 PM
So... Anyone ever use one of these monsters? It's basically a chain saw for an angle grinder.. I also read they're good for grinding stumps and I have a few of them to get rid of as well..
(http://www.katools.com/shop/oscthumb.php?src=otTO1dbU36KfmKygo5ykmcvk1g..&w=280&h=280&f=jpg&q=95&hash=c60b270e6db65f5aee7fc5597e912077)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 15, 2016, 01:48:00 PM
Watch "The Patriot" (Mel Gibson) first.

Plans available online.
Sorry..Gibson is a moron or as the rubes would say, "Get a life moran!"  Lol
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: PopeyesPappy on February 15, 2016, 02:39:38 PM
I'm currently at about 400 grit on my chisels and know that will dull rather quickly and does.. I saw some diamond plate on ebay cheap 400, 800 and 1200. I'm not sure what difference, if anything beyond 1200 will really make, but I don't suppose 18000 grit can hurt, but I do have other things to do with my life than just sharpen chisels..lol

Grit is complicated because it means different things to different types of surfaces. It isn't even the same across different manufactures of the same type of sharpener. A 1200 grit DMT diamond hone is courser than a 1200 grit waterstone. A Norton x-fine diamond is probably equal to about 900 grit US sandpaper. A DMT x-fine diamond is about the same as 1200 sandpaper. The only real way to tell is if you know the micron size of the abrasive.

I've got 3 combo stones I use on chisels along with a Garret Wade guide. A DMT diamond x-course/course combo (60/45 micron). A DMT diamond fine/x-fine combo (25/10 micron). A Lee Valley 4000/8000 combo Japanese waterstone (2/1 micron). I almost never use the diamond stones unless I'm removing a chip or changing an angle. The 8000 grit waterstone is about the equivalent of jeweler's rouge. I try to keep the final bevel at about 25 degrees because it stays sharper longer and doesn't require as much maintenance. A dozen passes on the 4000 and twice that on the 8000 after use keeps them shaving sharp once you've got your initial edge on them. A good chisel is high carbon steel so it will rust. I use carnauba car wax on mine to keep that from happening.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 15, 2016, 02:47:05 PM
Lancelot the chain saw. Lol.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 16, 2016, 02:42:26 AM
Thanks for the tip Pappy..
So I got this Chinese made plough plane and it works surprisingly well for cheap, but the irons on this thing are much harder than I expected which is good and bad I guess. The good is once I have them honed well they're likely to stay that way, but holy bajoly this stuff barely scratches on the coarse grit stone and being from China it's of course not flat as it should be. It's tempting to try to straighten with a hammer, but I know that isn't going to lead anywhere good..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160216_022836.jpg)
The reason I bought it was some of the reviews were pretty good and the price was right on Amazon..
These Asian planes are tough to set straight initially, but once they're set they cut well and straight and a hell of a lot cheaper than the heavy cast iron planes.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 16, 2016, 02:44:28 AM
Lancelot the chain saw. Lol.
King Arthur tools.. I guess someone was into monty python or something..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 16, 2016, 07:38:07 AM
^ this.
A knife "steel" would be the thing, I think, for very sharp edges. I used to shave with a Gerber Mk. I.

(http://www.gerber-tools.com/images/Gerber-Sportsman-Honing-Steel-large-1372.gif)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 16, 2016, 11:45:04 AM
A knife "steel" would be the thing, I think, for very sharp edges. I used to shave with a Gerber Mk. I.

(http://www.gerber-tools.com/images/Gerber-Sportsman-Honing-Steel-large-1372.gif)
I have one plane iron I just couldn't get an edge on no matter how long I stood there at the stone so I made a jig and used the kitchen steel..sharpest iron I have now..Stone helps keep the edge, but the steel got it there.. A kitchen steel is really nothing more than a file  oriented different from a flat file..Don't underestimate a good kitchen steel..lol
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: chill98 on February 16, 2016, 02:41:25 PM
As this project goes along, it would be great if you could post some pics.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 18, 2016, 10:16:17 AM
As this project goes along, it would be great if you could post some pics.
Well,  just for practice I like to make tenon and mortise joints by hand..it's all done with a chisel and mallet..if that helps..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160218_101246.jpg)
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160218_101045.jpg)
With a bit of practice most anyone should be able to cut a mortise (the hole) with a chisel in about 20 minutes or less. Now you could go buy a dedicated motising machine for about $300 OR spend about $8 for a good sharp chisel..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 18, 2016, 10:25:56 AM
So I was wondering if anyone has ever tried their hand at steaming wood to bend it..
I ran across this site that describes a cheapo steam box..  I've never tried it, but it's interesting anyway..
http://www.wood-w.com/wood-materials/quick-tips-questions-answers-6.html
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: chill98 on February 18, 2016, 12:06:48 PM
Well,  just for practice I like to make tenon and mortise joints by hand..it's all done with a chisel and mallet..if that helps..
With a bit of practice most anyone should be able to cut a mortise (the hole) with a chisel in about 20 minutes or less. Now you could go buy a dedicated motising machine for about $300 OR spend about $8 for a good sharp chisel..

Thanks for the pics.  This summer I hope to make a new aquarium stand, but its still in my head, so I will be watching this thread for ideas and buzz words so I can look up more info.

*Just watched a youtube vid on tenon / mortise joints. 
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 18, 2016, 02:40:05 PM
Nice site for plans for aquarium stands perhaps..  However, I just got a warning that the site may contain malware and phishing stuff.. Use your better judgment
http://www.woodworkersworkshop.com/resources/index.php?search=Aquarium+stand+

I've never had a problem with the site so it could just be someone who doesn't like the site reporting it as a malware site.. I've been there many times before with no problems at all until today..

Watch how Paul Sellers chops mortises. It might take several tries to get it right so be willing to practice with wood scraps till you get it down pat..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on February 18, 2016, 08:34:48 PM
Well,  just for practice I like to make tenon and mortise joints by hand..it's all done with a chisel and mallet..if that helps..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160218_101246.jpg)
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160218_101045.jpg)
With a bit of practice most anyone should be able to cut a mortise (the hole) with a chisel in about 20 minutes or less. Now you could go buy a dedicated motising machine for about $300 OR spend about $8 for a good sharp chisel..
:c029: I bow to you sir. I believe you when you say its easier than I probably think, but I still bow to you none the less. That is some very nice looking joinery.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 19, 2016, 03:37:28 AM
:c029: I bow to you sir. I believe you when you say its easier than I probably think, but I still bow to you none the less. That is some very nice looking joinery.
Thanks, but it's not as good as the picture may indicate. The shoulder cuts aren't true.  I used a plain old back saw,but I did make another recently with a chisel for the shoulder cuts and through its much more time consuming they turn out very crisp.
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160219_032450.jpg) It's something like this (just scrap) bevel side down and just make short cuts up to the knife wall to the depth you want then turn it length wise and split it with the same chisel. The mortise is simple. Just cut from both sides and your cuts meet somewhere in the center of the board so you don't get tear out.. Don't try to cut it all from one side or you'll ruin the wood.  An inexpensive marking gauge is pretty much mandatory, but I suppose you could do that with a knife and steel rule, but the marking gauge it much more accurate. I like this round gauge, but you can grab a square one at harbor freight for just a few bucks..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160219_033438.jpg)

Man, I really need to get a cabinet makers vise. The vise I've been using is a cheapo Pony bench vise .I cut the wood faces to replace the steel faces and it works for the most part, but definitely has limitations.
Sometime soon I'm going to build a laminated bench. I'm probably going to use the design from the Paul Sellers videos.
https://youtu.be/ru2ZiNs_Wek  I don't know that I'll go quite as extreme as Paul, but the basic principles are there..He makes everything look a whole lot easier than it is at first, but practice practice practice..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: popsthebuilder on February 19, 2016, 07:13:34 AM
As stated most joints can be drilled out at a size slightly larger than a screw head. The piece being joined should be tapped to a size small we than the ace thread. Use wood glue for additional support and dowels with alligned wood grain to hide screw holes, glueing them as well sand, stain, poly if you so choose.

Good luck.

Faith in selfless Unity for Good.

Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 19, 2016, 08:49:55 AM
As stated most joints can be drilled out at a size slightly larger than a screw head. The piece being joined should be tapped to a size small we than the ace thread. Use wood glue for additional support and dowels with alligned wood grain to hide screw holes, glueing them as well sand, stain, poly if you so choose.

Good luck.

Faith in selfless Unity for Good.


Just watched a video using what he calls Green and Green style which uses screws hidden with plugs.. Interesting stuff..
http://youtu.be/SxJ6qINNgmU It's basically box joints with an Asian twist which I like by the way.. I might just make a jewelry box for my granddaughter with the style and lock in place with pegs instead of screws..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 19, 2016, 09:17:07 AM
Don't remember if I posted this here before, but whatahey. (No, I didn't do the entire building, just the sign.)

(http://ibiblio.org/pha/EWC_Admin_Sign.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: popsthebuilder on February 19, 2016, 11:07:08 AM
Just watched a video using what he calls Green and Green style which uses screws hidden with plugs.. Interesting stuff..
http://youtu.be/SxJ6qINNgmU It's basically box joints with an Asian twist which I like by the way.. I might just make a jewelry box for my granddaughter with the style and lock in place with pegs instead of screws..
I love a more old style construction especially for furniture.

Faith in selfless Unity for Good.

Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 20, 2016, 10:42:55 AM
I love a more old style construction especially for furniture.

Faith in selfless Unity for Good.


Is anything more disappointing than a nice looking piece of furniture that upon closer inspection is particle board and pocket screws?
To be honest there probably is like nuclear war, but crappy furniture is right up there with nuclear war..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 20, 2016, 10:45:38 AM
Yippie.. I fixed my crosscut sled.
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160220_103450.jpg)

Now if I can just learn to keep my fingers away from the blade....
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 20, 2016, 11:33:13 AM
I have scars across three fingers to attest to that being a bad idea.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: kilodelta on February 20, 2016, 11:45:48 AM
That's an awesome coffee mug.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 20, 2016, 12:08:53 PM
That's an awesome coffee mug.
It's an old Wattaburger mug, about 50 years old..all glass. I like it..I try to avoid washing it. Coffee mugs shouldn't be washed unless something really nasty lands in it..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 22, 2016, 02:20:24 PM
So I've gotten pretty good at cutting slices of cow bone I once had a plan to use it for, but that didn't work out so now I have a small collection of bone slices I need to find a use for. Just put it in a vise and cut with a hand saw..  Thinking about a line of jewelry called Bad to the bone...
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160222_141421.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 22, 2016, 03:11:56 PM
If you're thinking of buying a dremel roto tool for $100 save your money and go to Harbor Freight and spend $30 for one of these handy doohickies.. It has more power and has a variable speed control  plus a nice 3" grinding wheel..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160222_150612.jpg)
It fits any 1/8 inch shaft and if I'm not mistaken you can probably use other chucks with it though I haven't tried yet..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 23, 2016, 05:16:48 AM
Why not use a drill motor that you've clamped down?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 23, 2016, 06:34:53 PM
Why not use a drill motor that you've clamped down?
That'll work too.. For 30 bucks though it's nice to have the grinder.. Harbor freight also has a hanging flex shaft machine that's actually rated very well even though most of their stuff is crap..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 23, 2016, 06:36:55 PM
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160223_183030.jpg)Made a snazzy tenon jig just because I'm kind of lazy when it comes to getting tenons square..
It ain't pretty, but it works..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 25, 2016, 10:51:13 PM
Joinery isn't great as the wood was badly cupped and twisted, but it gives me somewhere to put mail besides all over the dining room table..
To bad it's so badly cupped because it's a nice looking bit of western cedar.. Maybe some time with the plane someday and I can make 3/4 inch into some half decent 1/2 inch..
Western cedar is like working with balsa wood it's so soft,but nice looking grain..

(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160225_195705.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 26, 2016, 08:37:07 PM
The first person to correctly identify this popular woodworking piece of equipment may win a million dollars* if they return the winning numbers on time! 
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160226_203035.jpg)
And no, it's not the wood plane..it's the thingamajig the wood plane is setting on..



*Just as soon as soon idiot is willing and able to cough up a million bucks for this non-existent contest of skill and cunning
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: stromboli on February 26, 2016, 09:23:39 PM
I have scars across three fingers to attest to that being a bad idea.

Well you got me beat. Just 6 stitches in my left thumb and cut a slot in my right index finger.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: PopeyesPappy on February 26, 2016, 10:18:19 PM
The first person to correctly identify this popular woodworking piece of equipment may win a million dollars* if they return the winning numbers on time! 
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160226_203035.jpg)
And no, it's not the wood plane..it's the thingamajig the wood plane is setting on..



*Just as soon as soon idiot is willing and able to cough up a million bucks for this non-existent contest of skill and cunning

Workmate?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 27, 2016, 05:09:12 PM
Hint: The name would imply something to do with weaponry..

I'm getting rich on the interest of the million dollars* just waiting to be claimed! 





*Imaginary million dollars and deadline expires long before anyone ever comes up with the correct answer..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 28, 2016, 08:12:53 AM
I give up..nobody seems to have the right answer or perhaps nobody cares. (I suspect it's the latter)
Be that as it may the correct answer is a shooter or shooting board.  It's just three boards at right angles for the purpose of sqauring the edge of another board.. It can be any angle as well..
Now why don't they teach this stuff to every kid in school  or at least ol Norm should teach people about it, but Norm was bought up by Delta machinery long ago.. I guess there's no money in three boards anyone can nail together..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: PopeyesPappy on February 28, 2016, 08:57:13 AM
I'd never have got it. I used to use one of these for that kind of thing...

(http://lumberjocks.com/assets/pictures/reviews/69992.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 02, 2016, 06:20:22 PM
I'm a poor man Pappy so them fancy schmancy machines are out of my league..

Something I just saw on craigslist that I have a tough time buying and wouldn't even if I had the money..
Quote
Sawstop is now the safest table saw on the market. It has a triggering device that electronicaly senses skin contact so if you bump the blade with your hand or finger the blade drops so it does not cut if any, not as badly as a regular table saw will.

http://charlotte.craigslist.org/tls/5393920502.html

My big question is who would ever even think about testing this to see if it actually works?
Oh yeah..just stick your finger in here and watch it not chop it off..
Woops! There seems to be a little quality control issue..

How does it tell the difference between skin and say...bone?  I mean if it'll cut right through hard maple who in their right mind is going to see if the claim is accurate?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on March 02, 2016, 07:39:38 PM
I'm a poor man Pappy so them fancy schmancy machines are out of my league..

Something I just saw on craigslist that I have a tough time buying and wouldn't even if I had the money..
http://charlotte.craigslist.org/tls/5393920502.html

My big question is who would ever even think about testing this to see if it actually works?
Oh yeah..just stick your finger in here and watch it not chop it off..
Woops! There seems to be a little quality control issue..

How does it tell the difference between skin and say...bone?  I mean if it'll cut right through hard maple who in their right mind is going to see if the claim is accurate?
I don't own one but from what I understand they actually do work really well. The downside is there is a very expensive internal part that destroys itself when the protection system is triggered. If I had access to one, I wouldn't hesitate to offer one of my fingers to test it. But only if someone else was paying the bill to get it running again.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 02, 2016, 08:55:31 PM
I don't own one but from what I understand they actually do work really well. The downside is there is a very expensive internal part that destroys itself when the protection system is triggered. If I had access to one, I wouldn't hesitate to offer one of my fingers to test it. But only if someone else was paying the bill to get it running again.
the safer way then is to use a feather board.. I can't say I would ever trust that it did or didn't work.. a couple thousand for a maybe?  Not I said the octopus.. I need those fingers..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on March 03, 2016, 06:56:17 AM
Push sticks and feather boards are a requirement no matter what table saw you're using. The difference is that saw protects you from your own stupid moments. The problem with them isn't failing to detect and trigger when flesh finds the blade, they do that impeccably. The problem is false positives. They work by detecting certain electrical potential that always exists in abundance in every living creature. Most wood working wood is extremely dry and people are chock full of water and the electrical potential that goes with it. So much so that a machine can easily detect the difference without even breaking the skin to get through to the wet part.

So they work great right up till that day when you need to rip a piece of pressure treated you just bought for some outdoor project and that particular piece of pressure treated happens to have a shit ton of water in it. As soon as it touches the blade, you're out several hundred dollars to get your saw running again.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 03, 2016, 01:53:53 PM
Ha! Well so much for using pallet wood. I have an old pallet I ripped up not long ago that if you didn't know better you would think that it was soaked in turpentine for a month. A lot of the pallets around here are made from green wood. I'd guess that about 60-70% of the trees in these parts are pine and there's no shortage of saw mills in South Carolina.
It's funny because the ad I saw that in was the Columbia craigslist..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on March 03, 2016, 07:24:48 PM
Yeah definitely not the saw you'd want if you're using wet wood. I believe they're very popular with high school woodshops which tend to use only dry wood and tend to have lots of kids who have no business running a table saw running a table saw.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 04, 2016, 05:56:42 AM
Yeah definitely not the saw you'd want if you're using wet wood. I believe they're very popular with high school woodshops which tend to use only dry wood and tend to have lots of kids who have no business running a table saw running a table saw.
Did you just get off the bus from 1972ville? When was the last time you even heard of a high school offering woodshop as part of the curriculum? They don't even teach cursive writing in school anymore.
They probably should teach woodworking in schools, but the insurance rates to have teenage kids around equipment that can rip hands off went out with the dinosaurs.
Then again it's been awhile since I was in woodshop class myself. We still used sandpaper back in my day..
There is a damned good argument to be made that kids definitely can benefit from wood shop and other related classes.  You can teach math to kids all day long and at the end of the day if they have no place to apply what they learn you might as well be teaching them to wipe their asses with a computer.
http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/family/articles/2011/01/04/why_some_educators_are_putting_a_new_emphasis_on_woodworking_class/
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on March 04, 2016, 06:43:02 AM
What does cursive writing have to do with woodworking? I'm no woodworking expert but I can't remember a time when I needed cursive writing skills to accomplish any woodworking task. And while its certainly true that far fewer school systems still offer shop class than was the case 30 years ago, it is most certainly not true that high school shop is completely extinct.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: PopeyesPappy on March 04, 2016, 11:52:38 PM
So I checked to see what Huntsville City Schools offers at trade school these days. No wood shop, auto body/repair or welding classes. They do still have carpentry and electrician curriculum though. Some of the new stuff (i.e. shit they didn't have in the 70s when I was there) includes computer security and networking, machining and 3D modeling.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 06, 2016, 05:10:37 AM
Seriously considering getting one of these..
(http://www.garrettwade.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/730x/0dc2d03fe217f8c83829496872af24a0/9/8/98N1101_23.jpg)
http://www.garrettwade.com/wood-threader-tap-die-set-gp.html for using to build furniture.. I've looked up wooden threaded screws and bolts on google, but so far haven't found much for reference, but I still love the idea. Years ago my grandmother had an old desk that was badly damaged so I took it apart and the top was held down using wooden screws..

And Johan you're right. Cursive writing has nothing to do with woodworking.  It's just kind of symptomatic of the things disappearing from the public knowledge base..

By the way, something I like about garretwade.com.. Most items they sell offer a pdf file you can download to explain how it's used and some instructions for use.. Nice touch I think..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: drunkenshoe on March 06, 2016, 07:18:36 AM
(This thread is making me warm and giving me peace.)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 20, 2016, 09:53:20 AM
(This thread is making me warm and giving me peace.)
That's the only reason for this thread.. Warmth and world peace..  I'm secretly preparing for my run to become the next Miss America..  :lol:
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 20, 2016, 09:59:32 AM
So I'm making various planter boxes to go around the yard.  I'm giving some thought to seeing if I can sell enough of these to pay a few bills here and there.
My personal favorite is the tenon and mortise version though some might like the box joint model better.  The tenon model is stronger and doesn't require any glue or nails or screws..just a wooden peg here and there..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160320_094851.jpg)
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160320_094730.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on March 20, 2016, 11:50:11 AM
The mortice and tenon version might be the better box from a technical standpoint. But I think people will buy the shit out of the box joint version if you get the price point right. So the question is can you produce them in quantity for a cost, including your time, that allows you sell them at a profit?

Edit to add, the mortice tenon version does look great too. I think it might sell very well with a nice stain on it whereas you could probably sell the box joint unfinished or stained. Also, have you considered doing a mortice and tenon version with tapered sides i.e. smaller dimensions at the base than at the top? Add a few degrees of taper to the sides, put a good finish on it and I bet wouldn't be able to make them fast enough.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 20, 2016, 03:46:21 PM
The angles are time killers, but yeah, I might do that, but they won't be compound angles..Here it is with a slapping of linseed oil..I put pegs on the tenons to hold them tighter and pegs in the base.. I suppose if I'm going to sell them I might learn to get rid of the pencil lines before oiling them down..:lol:
I can bring the price down with the time by setting up a few jigs to speed things up and maybe using a router for the motises.. Then it's just a matter of cleaning up the corners with a chisel..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160320_153608.jpg)
Something else I may do is to extend the tenons out an inch or so, drill through and add a dowel rod as a handle.. I was going to do that with this one, but I had already cut it and didn't want to make it shorter..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: drunkenshoe on March 20, 2016, 03:47:51 PM
That's the only reason for this thread.. Warmth and world peace..  I'm secretly preparing for my run to become the next Miss America..  :lol:

LOL OK I meant inner peace. Bad English.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 20, 2016, 04:10:30 PM
LOL OK I meant inner peace. Bad English.
I knew what you meant.. The truth is I'd rather be a smart ass than a dumb ass.. Some people might debate which one I am, but I'm clinging to being a smart ass..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on March 20, 2016, 06:12:06 PM
I don't think you'd need any compound angles. Just put some bevel cuts on the base piece to set the angle of the uprights. The really hard part I think would be cutting the tenon cheeks on an angle.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 20, 2016, 07:17:24 PM
The fence in the backyard looks pretty bad at least the caps..old and rotted so.... a  upcoming project is to replace these old caps
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160320_181605.jpg)
with something similar to this
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160320_181614.jpg)
except cleaned up a bunch and painted and planted with flowers for fence caps..
This one was just a prototype to get an idea of how it might look. There are actually about 40 posts, only about 15 are where they can be seen without hunting behind bushes and trees.
I'm probably going to drill holes at an angle for drainage and tap in some 1/4 -3/8ths pvc tubing to keep the water from completely rotting the posts..

This yard is a never ending job just keeping it from turning back into a swamp..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 20, 2016, 07:26:47 PM
I don't think you'd need any compound angles. Just put some bevel cuts on the base piece to set the angle of the uprights. The really hard part I think would be cutting the tenon cheeks on an angle.
I thought just cutting the end pieces at angles and the tenons can be standard 90° cuts. As for the base I can just use the plane for whatever angle I want the sides to be.. I did a bunch of angled tenons and that's a bunch of practice and wasting of scraps to get right..
A 45° tenon for example is something like this..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160320_192200.jpg) and it goes into a straight 90° mortise.  I cut a bunch of them, but just couldn't seem to get the two angles to meet at the right place..I am always just a hair off, but I'll eventually get it someday, but not for planter boxes..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 23, 2016, 12:04:06 AM
So I'm in the process of refinishing an old dresser that has a bunch of concave and convex surfaces.  I'm using some citrus stripping gel which works pretty good for taking off the 6 layers of old paint, but it's the concave and convex surfaces that have me kind of stuck. I'm not quite sure what tools to use so that I don't end up digging into the wood.  Flat surfaces no problem..
Any suggestions?
And before you give me the PBS lecture about not refinishing old furniture that's all good and well if the piece is old enough and worth even thinking about dragging to their show.. I'm not and the dresser is just an old dresser that will never be worth more than the cost of the stripping gel.. Ok, maybe a few hundred bucks tops, but that's about it..

Edit: Disregard the above..twas written at about 3am when believe it or not I was actually tired.. Hard to believe it, but I too get tired just like you mere mortals..  What is the world coming to?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 23, 2016, 11:24:59 PM
Something not quite as fun as it appears at first glance is spending all day scraping about 6 layers of paint off of a dresser that's probably not worth the effort and spending the next 3 or so days sanding the whole thing down.. On the bright side the top has a pretty cool wood pattern. At first I thought it was pine, but it's way to hard for pine.. Any experienced eyes have a clue to what species of wood this might be?
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160323_185343.jpg)
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160323_224418.jpg)
At first I thought cherry then mahogany, but the top is just too light of color for either. It's not hard enough to be maple, but much to hard to be pine..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 25, 2016, 12:20:48 AM
Got the top, most of the front and 3 drawers of 6 sanded down pretty much..Still have 3 drawers, the rest of the front and both sides left to work on. I'm definitely tired of sand paper and all the dust it creates..This thing would have been much nicer if it was still square. The entire thing is bowed from left to right, but its still holding together pretty good and the drawers don't stick.. I'm looking forward to being done with this fucker.. I kind of wish I hadn't started it, but I'm more than half way through..No looking back now.. I'm going to swear off of being a fucking perfectionist..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 25, 2016, 09:17:56 PM
I'm officially really fucking tired of sanding wood.. 1.5 drawers left and the final sanding and done!  The final solution will be a coat of walnut stained Danish oil.. Sorry,  no Jews will be killed which probably makes Barach happy..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 25, 2016, 10:40:50 PM
Twas covered by about 6 layers of very ugly paint.. Almost there!
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160325_223801.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on March 26, 2016, 09:54:49 AM
Looks great!
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: aitm on March 26, 2016, 09:59:32 AM
Sure looks like birch to me, but birch isn't particularly as hard as you make it to be.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 26, 2016, 10:49:33 AM
Sure looks like birch to me, but birch isn't particularly as hard as you make it to be.
I didn't think about birch.. It just might be.. The top and drawer fronts are different woods than the rest of the case. The case has a much more reddish tint to it almost like cedar, but harder.  The only problem I have with the whole thing is the side panels which are some sort of old paper-like material with a layer of veneer. The back right leg is split and a chunk about 6 inches broken off which exposes the panel. That corner will be in the corner of the bedroom never to be seen by human eyes again..lol
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 26, 2016, 12:31:20 PM
Other than Festool does anyone know of any company making an electric inline sander? Most inline sanders are pneumatic and require a pretty beefy compressor to run as they suck up a lot of air.
In case you're wondering an inline sander runs in just two directions, forward and backward,  not orbital.  Most are made for doing auto body work. If I still had a 5 hp compressor it would be a no brainer,but I'm not about to invest $600 just to run one sander once in awhile..

Edit.. HOLY CRAP! The few I could find run about $600 and up..On the other hand a pneumatic inline sander can be had for around $50 brand new.. Of course those are the cheapo models. I had several pneumatic inline sanders. Maybe the compressor isn't such a bad idea after all..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 26, 2016, 06:40:23 PM
And here it is,  transformed from fugly coats of nasty ass paint to a nice coat of linseed oil over a walnut Danish oil.. I think it came out pretty good except the few spots with deep gouges and the bad corner..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160326_183250.jpg)
I'm going to put some sort of insert inside the handles instead of trying to clean all the paint out of all 12. Maybe some sort of flat black material..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: aitm on March 26, 2016, 06:42:49 PM
That grain certainly looks like birch. Looks nice
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on March 26, 2016, 10:07:08 PM
Maybe the compressor isn't such a bad idea after all..
A compressor is always a good idea.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: aitm on March 26, 2016, 10:08:18 PM
bigger compressors are ALWAYS better
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 26, 2016, 10:21:53 PM
Dammit..nothing to do in the shop now besides wait for the linseed oil to cure a bit.. I suppose I could clean up out here and make myself useful..
Nahhh.. A messy shop is a busy shop even when there's nothing to do..
Problem I have with a compressor is A..no room for it B lack of $600± just sitting around waiting to burn a hole in my pocket and C Then I'd have to paint Sylvia's car after I fucked up the hood last year..

By the way aitm..thanks for the linseed oil suggestion awhile back.
Here's a good bit of information about how linseed oil works..
http://www.aawforum.org/vbforum/showthread.php?2793-finishing-with-boiled-linsed-oil
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on March 29, 2016, 11:37:20 PM
FUCK FUCK AND DOUBLE FUCK! I hit a hidden nail in some old door jam wood I was planing down for another project so now my favorite planing iron has a nice, fat chip right dead smack in the middle . I am fixing to start building a workbench and going to be planing a lot of stuff so instead I'll be hand grinding the iron for a while..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 02, 2016, 02:08:38 PM
Made some nifty bar clamps for under a buck each.. Scrap lumber (old door jam) leftover dowel rod and some threaded rod.. used a drill and tap .. works great and very adjustable for length and thickness..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160402_135940.jpg)
I need to get ambitious and make about 10 more of them..I started working on the laminated bench top. Planing down 2X4s is lots of uhh..fun.I have about 20 to do..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 02, 2016, 09:07:58 PM
My makeshift leg vise crapped out today, but it was just a 1/2 inch steel rod threaded through the leg of the workbench to begin with. The wood gave way to the threads so I rebuilt it with 5/8 rod into a steel extender nut mortised into a 2x4. It ain't going anywhere for the time being..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 03, 2016, 03:27:30 PM
My fancy schmancy bar clamp in action..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160403_152123.jpg)
And my fancy schmancy leg clamp..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160403_152409.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 07, 2016, 12:04:48 AM
I finally got started on building my new work bench and hopefully this one will last the rest of my lifetime.. Who knows..Maybe one of my grandkids will get it and take good care of it after I'm dead and gone.
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160406_234616.jpg)
This is just part of one end. I still have 4 more mortises to chop and the rest of the tenons for 8 total.  The top is going to be 5 feet long, 32" wide and 3 1/3 deep with either 8 or 12 inch aprons. I thought about making it 6 feet, but I don't really have the space and if I need more bench space I can always built another or add a fold down section..
You can't see it, but I screwed up the first mortise. I didn't flip the board end to end when I was marking the mortise so I was off 1/16th in two directions so instead of a 1/2 inch mortise it wound up 5/8ths..no fun trying to cut 1/16th out of the inside of a 3 inch deep mortise..
I'm modeling it after something very similar to the one in the picture..
(https://wm-5e0.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/image31.jpg?w=396&h=297&crop=1)

After that's done I'm ripping out the old bench that was built by the previous owners of the house here. It's ok except it's nailed 2x4s with a plywood top and very little space for shelving because it's butted up against the wall and too wide and tall to use the wall space behind it.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 07, 2016, 06:10:09 PM
Smacked the same finger with a mallet that I almost chopped off with the table saw..  Ouch! 
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 07, 2016, 06:18:14 PM
Smacked the same finger with a mallet that I almost chopped off with the table saw..  Ouch! 
Mr. Finger has filed a restraining order against you, Mr. APA. You can approaching no closer than 500 yards to Mr. Finger.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 07, 2016, 06:30:50 PM
Mr. Finger has filed a restraining order against you, Mr. APA. You can approaching no closer than 500 yards to Mr. Finger.
Probably a good idea..lol
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160407_181933.jpg)
One end done.  It ain't gonna be pretty, but it ain't gonna just fall apart first time I hit something besides my finger with a mallet..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: aitm on April 07, 2016, 06:52:02 PM
If we lived in the same neighborhood we would have tremendously messy garages, but oh…..the furniture we could make….I love you.






er



ahem…..what the fuck is wrong with you and your fingers asshole?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 07, 2016, 08:59:42 PM
Jeeez.. You're starting to sound like my gf.. what the fuck is wrong with me indeed.... You should see my messy floor out here in the shop.. I leave the wood shavings there if for no other reason than they're cusioning for my feet and they help soak up the vomit when I read one of your posts.. lol
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160407_210045.jpg)
Messy yes, but it's very comforting to my feet and ankles. It's not a lot of fun when I inadvertently drop small parts on the floor though..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 07, 2016, 09:09:39 PM
I'm taking a break from pounding on chisels and such for awhile. My hands (fingers too) and shoulders are starting to ache. 4 mortises left to chop.. 3.5 inches deep and 3.5 long..then the fun part of cutting the tenons.. I could set up the tenon jig and use the table saw, but I like using chisels instead. It's probably just an illusion, but I feel like I'm actually accomplishing something that way..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 08, 2016, 01:49:55 PM
ahem…..what the fuck is wrong with you and your fingers asshole?
That need a comma somefuckingwhere in there.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 08, 2016, 08:21:52 PM
Personally I find it just a tad insulting to mention my finger and asshole in the same sentence, but in the name of why can't we all just get along and sing kumbyaism I'm willing to overlook it just this once.. However, the next time  be prepared to wake up chained to a tree naked and me standing there with my crappy, but very sharp Stanley SB4 plane and a very evil look on my face..It will fail to be the most pleasant experience of your life unless you have a strange kink and the burning desire to be castrated 1/100th of an inch at a time..

Enough of the unpleasantries.. I got my hands on a 1941 model OH4 Stanley two tone plane. It's a bit rusty, but cuts dead on.
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_20160408_125046.jpg)
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160408_201448.jpg)
It's going to need a new tote (back handle) because it's beginning to rot, but it still works pretty damn good..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 08, 2016, 09:31:57 PM
By the way..anyone in the market for a wood plane don't waste your money on much of anything newer than 40-50 years old. Go straight to ebay or a comparable site and find you an old Stanley made before 1970. Even if it looks old and rusty it'll likely slice through wood much better and faster than anything on the market today.  You might have to do a bit of truing the sole and honing the blade, but the difference is like the difference between trying to get to the moon by stacking up greasy ball bearings and taking a rocket ship.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 09, 2016, 01:37:33 PM
Well..apparently my hand isn't made of wood..
I'm off to the VA and likely stitches..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160409_133428.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 09, 2016, 06:57:08 PM
I'm probably not going to be chopping mortises for a few days. This hurts more now than it did when I actually jabbed the chisel into it, but on the bright side the lady doc who sewed me up was cute and flirty.. I'm kind of hoping she's the one who removes the stitches.. 5 new stitches in me.. I need to learn how to not hurt myself, but at least I got some good drugs out of the deal.. It even hurts to type so later..I'm going into a drug induced coma..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on April 09, 2016, 07:12:51 PM
Oye. Hoping for a speedy recovery.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Mike Cl on April 09, 2016, 07:53:13 PM
It's an old Wattaburger mug, about 50 years old..all glass. I like it..I try to avoid washing it. Coffee mugs shouldn't be washed unless something really nasty lands in it..
I am always surprised about the number of people who just don't know this!
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 10, 2016, 05:19:36 AM
I have a hunch this new hole in my hand is going to stick around awhile.. I've been up all night and it just throbs in a not so wonderful way.. Just petting the cat hurts.. lol  I'm kind of hoping it's just sewn a bit too tight and that's it.  I've been stitched up more times than I want to remember and sometimes the stitching job is what makes it hurt more than the actual cut. The doc was sweet and all, but if I had to do it all again I'd ask someone else to do the sewing.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 10, 2016, 10:16:16 AM
I have a hunch this new hole in my hand is going to stick around awhile.. I've been up all night and it just throbs in a not so wonderful way.. Just petting the cat hurts.. lol  I'm kind of hoping it's just sewn a bit too tight and that's it.  I've been stitched up more times than I want to remember and sometimes the stitching job is what makes it hurt more than the actual cut. The doc was sweet and all, but if I had to do it all again I'd ask someone else to do the sewing.
Keep your hand above your heart, a homebrew sling will do. That'll handle most of the throbbing. And use ice, as needed.

You're truly,
Ben There.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: aitm on April 10, 2016, 03:09:59 PM
Ice until you can't stand it. Then epsom salts in hot water for ten fifteen minutes, back into some ice and smack your toe with a hammer. Hand won't hurt at all…for awhile.

Nice gash by the way…..at least I cut my whole finger off…I don't fuck around.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on April 10, 2016, 03:30:12 PM
Bourbon until you can't stand. Then more bourbon.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 11, 2016, 12:46:48 PM


Nice gash by the way…..at least I cut my whole finger off…I don't fuck around.
Meh, no bone showing. Can't give full points.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: stromboli on April 11, 2016, 01:25:23 PM
Flush with Hydrogen Peroxide that you don't have at home. Elevate above heart. Cover with a sterile bandage that you also don't have, go to doctor. Be injected with painkiller multiple times that is way more painful than the stitches. After fighting back tears and anticipating agonizing pain after the feeling comes back, go on with your project. Infect wound not yet healed. Lose hand to infection.

First aid kit that you should have at home
http://i.imgur.com/sPwgpLj.gif?noredirect

Along with Hydrogen Peroxide 3% solution.

Used to teach this shit.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 11, 2016, 02:38:09 PM
I have all that stuff at home, I cross-trained with the team's medic.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: stromboli on April 11, 2016, 02:50:24 PM
I have all that stuff at home, I cross-trained with the team's medic.

Congrats. Taught advanced first aid when a firefighter.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 11, 2016, 03:46:38 PM
Ice until you can't stand it. Then epsom salts in hot water for ten fifteen minutes, back into some ice and smack your toe with a hammer. Hand won't hurt at all…for awhile.

Nice gash by the way…..at least I cut my whole finger off…I don't fuck around.
I remember some guy saying to never trust a shop teacher missing a finger.. He probably don't know what the fuck he's doing..  Are you or have you ever been a shop teacher? 

It's healing up thanks to good drugs..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 11, 2016, 03:51:15 PM
I do have a first aid kit at home although the stuff is all over the place and I have to go buy it every time I need it..  I probably ought to keep at least one filthy rag out in the shop though..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: stromboli on April 11, 2016, 06:34:59 PM
I do have a first aid kit at home although the stuff is all over the place and I have to go buy it every time I need it..  I probably ought to keep at least one filthy rag out in the shop though..

The reason I recommend the J&J first aid kit is because they are universally available, cheap, and you can buy more than one if need be. Hydrogen Peroxide is a universal disinfectant that is also cheap and readily available. About the needles, pain, stitches shit- I had a "power tool" accident last November. 6 stitches in the face of my left thumb, which is why I have no feeling there now.  :biggrin:
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: aitm on April 12, 2016, 06:11:04 PM
  Are you or have you ever been a shop teacher?   

Hell no, if I was, them little fuckers would be making hundreds of craft thingies that I would sell on-line.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 12, 2016, 06:15:38 PM
Hell no, if I was, them little fuckers would be making hundreds of craft thingies that I would sell on-line.
Or sell them little fuckers at the butcher shop.. At that age they're still nice and tender..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 12, 2016, 06:20:14 PM
The reason I recommend the J&J first aid kit is because they are universally available, cheap, and you can buy more than one if need be. Hydrogen Peroxide is a universal disinfectant that is also cheap and readily available. About the needles, pain, stitches shit- I had a "power tool" accident last November. 6 stitches in the face of my left thumb, which is why I have no feeling there now.  :biggrin:
I'm not sure that's the first-aid kit I want in the shop.. it seems just a tad...oh..I dunno.. Prissy might be the word I'm looking for..
(https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ_HRXDMoiTQDSKEapNZ9VCMnez4J_7YACiZvUoRqdzWOsxGi9A6vIByQSaCGTfdf4tFP1yxbBE&usqp=CAY)
Although whenever I chop into my hands and am in severe pain the first thing that comes to mind are Disney characters..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 13, 2016, 08:16:14 AM
Hell no, if I was, them little fuckers would be making hundreds of craft thingies that I would sell on-line.
Sell them to Wal-mart.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: stromboli on April 13, 2016, 12:20:55 PM
I'm not sure that's the first-aid kit I want in the shop.. it seems just a tad...oh..I dunno.. Prissy might be the word I'm looking for..
(https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ_HRXDMoiTQDSKEapNZ9VCMnez4J_7YACiZvUoRqdzWOsxGi9A6vIByQSaCGTfdf4tFP1yxbBE&usqp=CAY)
Although whenever I chop into my hands and am in severe pain the first thing that comes to mind are Disney characters..

And here I was thinking of a kinder, gentler and more sensitive APA.........
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 13, 2016, 05:17:45 PM
And here I was thinking of a kinder, gentler and more sensitive APA.........
I'll become kinder, gentler and more sensitiver if it'll make you happy. But I'm still not gonna buy one of them pansy assed first aid kits that you seem to favor.. I'm getting a Warner Brothers character kit..maybe a Speed Racer one if they make em..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 13, 2016, 05:23:57 PM
By the way..I tried hammering away to try to cut the rest of the mortises.. I can do it if I hold the mallet kind of sideways, but it ain't the same.  It cuts ok, but wears down the muscles in my hand that I ordinarily wouldn't use and a lot slower..
I gotta quit this shit of chooping into my hands someday..It's just not working out..

Uhh..that's chopping, not chooping.. in case anyone thought I invented a new word..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 14, 2016, 09:10:40 AM
One tough old guy who takes his craft serious.. Mulberry is a really heavy and hard wood.. it grows wild all over the northeast. Makes me wonder why more of it isn't harvested for lumber..
https://youtu.be/3vUmbLfWZj4
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 14, 2016, 05:43:30 PM


Uhh..that's chopping, not chooping.. in case anyone thought I invented a new word..
Shit hoopens.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 14, 2016, 05:51:18 PM
Shit hoopens.
Well SHOOT! 
Can't kid me man.. Shoot is shit with 2 O's..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 14, 2016, 05:58:05 PM
I must be slipping..I made it through 2 new mortise holes WITHOUT chopping into a single finger or thumb..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160414_175316.jpg)
No fear though..2 to go plus 4 tenons..  Have faith..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 14, 2016, 06:03:50 PM
Just in case anyone is even thinking about buying a sharpening stone from bestsharpeningstones.com DON'T.. They ripped me off and apparently several other people who do woodworking. I filed a dispute with my bank, but still out the $55 in the meantime.. Fuckers..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 15, 2016, 03:14:37 PM
I finally got around to fixing the leg vise on the old bench.. it ain't pretty, but it grips great and does the job I pay it to do.. Total cost.. $4 for lag bolts and I think $8 for the 5/8th threaded rod and nuts..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160415_143644.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 15, 2016, 03:27:44 PM
Do you have the number for the fire department painted on the wall?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 15, 2016, 03:56:11 PM
Do you have the number for the fire department painted on the wall?
I probably should.  Sylvia came out and lit up a shaving just to see how fast they burn.
I should sweep it all up, but those shavings are great for standing on instead of bare concrete..Saves the ankles from concrete pain.. You know about that pain...right? 
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 15, 2016, 04:48:48 PM
I probably should.  Sylvia came out and lit up a shaving just to see how fast they burn.
I should sweep it all up, but those shavings are great for standing on instead of bare concrete..Saves the ankles from concrete pain..
Get one of those foam backed kitchen mats.
Quote
You know about that pain...right? 
"Went to sleep" in S.E.A., woke up in San Diego. Three months in hospital, two years physical therapy. Yeah, I know a little about pain.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 15, 2016, 11:42:11 PM
I thought about one of those mats,but I've worked in plenty of kitchens over the years..They just never seem to feel right to my feet..
Pain is very subjective. I have a low pain threshold and a high tolerance for pain medication so it typically goes untreated for the most part.  That kind of sucks.. I wish it were the other way around..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on April 16, 2016, 01:51:22 PM
http://www.harborfreight.com/4-piece-anti-fatigue-foam-mat-set-94635.html (http://www.harborfreight.com/4-piece-anti-fatigue-foam-mat-set-94635.html)
I've been using these for years. They're not expensive and they hold up great. I will not stand at a workbench without them.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: aitm on April 16, 2016, 02:16:55 PM
Since I know you all love stories about pain, and especially about me being in pain, I shall give you this delightful story:

The date is unimportant as Sheldon would say, so was this sentence.

I was replacing the deck on a pontoon boat I bought and did not have any good tools to cut off the bolts that held down the plywood so I was using a chisel to cut around the bolts so I could remove the plywood and cut the bolts off later when I got the parts. As I was using the chisel, I would have to use a hammer to pull the chisel back out of the plywood as it is pretty damn hard to just pull a chisel out of wood. So any-hoo….over the course of an hour or so the plastic handle started to slowly separate from the metal chisels ferrel.

Eventually it must have separated at least a quarter inch and when I set the chisel in place for another hammer, the skin between my thumb and first finger somehow slipped inside the gap and low and behold when I hit that fucker with the hammer I found myself not only in a great deal of pain, but trapped outside the reach of my hammer to pull the chisel back out! And I do mean pretty intensive pain so that I was writhing around the boat trying and quite willing to rip the skin to get out of the trap but it had too much skin, I would need to have had a knife which alas I did not, and frankly I had a hard time thinking at that time.

Luck, such as it was, was at least pitying me as a guy driving down the road saw me in quite an elaborate dance and figured out I needed help. Knowing that even pulling out the chisel the fact that my skin would still be trapped painfully between the ferrel and handle he grabbed the razor outside my grasp and asked me if I wanted him to proceed.  I told him in very kind language to cut me loose, and……by golly luck indeed smiled at my unfortunate condition and gave me a rescuer quite competent with a utility blade and though one might think that cutting off a nice chunk of skin might hurt….it was indeed a great relief. For a second or two……

Very funny in retro…whatever that word is…but not so much on that day.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 16, 2016, 10:27:57 PM
Since I know you all love stories about pain, and especially about me being in pain, I shall give you this delightful story:

The date is unimportant as Sheldon would say, so was this sentence.

I was replacing the deck on a pontoon boat I bought and did not have any good tools to cut off the bolts that held down the plywood so I was using a chisel to cut around the bolts so I could remove the plywood and cut the bolts off later when I got the parts. As I was using the chisel, I would have to use a hammer to pull the chisel back out of the plywood as it is pretty damn hard to just pull a chisel out of wood. So any-hoo….over the course of an hour or so the plastic handle started to slowly separate from the metal chisels ferrel.

Eventually it must have separated at least a quarter inch and when I set the chisel in place for another hammer, the skin between my thumb and first finger somehow slipped inside the gap and low and behold when I hit that fucker with the hammer I found myself not only in a great deal of pain, but trapped outside the reach of my hammer to pull the chisel back out! And I do mean pretty intensive pain so that I was writhing around the boat trying and quite willing to rip the skin to get out of the trap but it had too much skin, I would need to have had a knife which alas I did not, and frankly I had a hard time thinking at that time.

Luck, such as it was, was at least pitying me as a guy driving down the road saw me in quite an elaborate dance and figured out I needed help. Knowing that even pulling out the chisel the fact that my skin would still be trapped painfully between the ferrel and handle he grabbed the razor outside my grasp and asked me if I wanted him to proceed.  I told him in very kind language to cut me loose, and……by golly luck indeed smiled at my unfortunate condition and gave me a rescuer quite competent with a utility blade and though one might think that cutting off a nice chunk of skin might hurt….it was indeed a great relief. For a second or two……

Very funny in retro…whatever that word is…but not so much on that day.
You really should reconsider and become a shop class teacher..  That's almost as bad as me being stuck in a dumpster with half a glass window stuck in my elbow with absolutely no way to break the glass except to jam my elbow deeper into the glass till it broke ..lucky for me glass does eventually break, but it breaks slowly when it has your arm jammed between it and the window frame in a dumster on the weekend 3 miles from the nearest anything.. I still think about that day and wonder how the fuck I got my arm in there to begin with.  Nothing like getting stuck in pain for several hours..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: stromboli on April 16, 2016, 10:30:50 PM
Been impaled a few times. Once by a car..... Blunt force trauma by an asphalt roller when 14. Impaled myself on a barbed wire fence on a motorcycle. Ripped my bicep tendon clean in two when working as an aircraft welder. Thought my last name was Schwarzeneger and tried to pick up a 1 ton ford real axle; don't do that.

The main reason I learned first aid was to save myself, truth be known. Rule, stated once before; don't work construction if you are accident prone. 
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 16, 2016, 10:42:25 PM
I've been lucky that I have never had a serious injury on the job or even at home and I've been around a shitload of people who have. Funny thing is that the people who tell me that I don't pay attention to things are the people who are always cutting off body parts on a regular basis. I've pulled guy out of places where they probably should have died, but I still haven't been nailed by anything that required more than a few stitches.
The most dangerous was when I was rigging heavy machinery and could have very easily been crushed to death many times over, but I was the smartass who insisted on having equipment that was in new or almost new condition and having the safety guards in place. Screw craining things around with a worn out sling ESPECIALLY when the thing being held up by the sling can kill you in a split second..
And yet I have wood shavings all over the place.. I can run if the house is on fire..It's tough to run with 8 tons of steel falling on you..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 17, 2016, 04:11:17 PM
After looking at hundreds, perhaps thousands of different workbench examples I'm struck at how many people seem to think that their bench should be more of a work of art than an actual functional tool for getting the job done.
Personally I could care less about what mine looks like as long as it's sturdy, square and able to withstand whatever abuse that may come its way.  The leg vise I made ain't pretty and anyone who thinks that the looks are more important than the function is more than welcome to get their dick caught in it then tell me that it's just not pretty enough..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 17, 2016, 04:16:45 PM
Yey! Got the legs all built and ready to start building the tops and aprons..
I know..just not pretty enough..dammit! I'll be forever ashamed of myself for the lack of aesthetics..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160417_135335.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on April 17, 2016, 07:14:06 PM
Looks great. Good solid joinery along with good symmetrical lines will always an aesthetic appeal.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 17, 2016, 09:08:18 PM
Looks great. Good solid joinery along with good symmetrical lines will always an aesthetic appeal.
It's going to have to come apart though. The tenons on top have to be cut flush to fit the aprons. I don't know why I didn't think about that beforehand, but at least I haven't glued them in. I have the lumber for the aprons and the tool well and part of the top. I guess I got lucky and found plenty of nice straight lumber for once so there should be a minimum of planing..if you consider planing the wide parts of the 2x4s minimal..
A few of the joints won't need glue as they're tight enough, but a few will need glue. The last thing I need if to be assembling things and have the joints get stuck halfway in..
I'm still stuck on whether to make it 5' long or 6.. I like 5 better and less chance of it bowing in the middle.
I really wish I hadn't put the chisel into my hand..This would go a whole lot quicker..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 19, 2016, 12:44:09 PM
Holy crap it's a shitload of work planing a 12" by 6 foot long board, basically 3 2x4s glued together at the edges  so I need them down far enough to get past the rounded corners..I have two of them to do on both sides. It probably wouldn't be so bad if it were 70°, but it's already 85 and the garage sort of traps heat..
I should have invested in a power surface planer. This is going to take me a good long while..
If I die from a heart attack somewhere along the way just remember that I care about all of you.. Well,  some of you..Ok, almost nobody, but I do care..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 19, 2016, 07:44:18 PM
Does anyone believe that I actually swept up the mess in here yesterday?
It's BAAAAACK!
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160419_193955.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 19, 2016, 07:47:45 PM
Holy crap it's a shitload of work planing a 12" by 6 foot long board, basically 3 2x4s glued together at the edges  so I need them down far enough to get past the rounded corners..I have two of them to do on both sides. It probably wouldn't be so bad if it were 70°, but it's already 85 and the garage sort of traps heat..
I should have invested in a power surface planer. This is going to take me a good long while..
If I die from a heart attack somewhere along the way just remember that I care about all of you.. Well,  some of you..Ok, almost nobody, but I do care..
Have you considered standing them on the long edge and running them past the table saw blade? One pass on either side to get close to your thickness.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 19, 2016, 08:27:59 PM
I did consider it, but it's not really the thickness I'm trying to reduce so much as getting beyond the rounded corners not to mention that my table saw is a piece of junk as far as table saws go. I'm just about done with the aprons. I have the tool well to do then go buy the lumber for the top, glue it up, plane it then that moment of truth when I find out if I can assemle it square and true.. I'm getting all tingly inside just thinking about it..lol
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 19, 2016, 10:15:23 PM
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160419_215740.jpg)Glueup time always fun
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 20, 2016, 01:23:31 AM
Looks like something the First Order would dream up.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 20, 2016, 08:32:33 AM
Looks like something the First Order would dream up.
It's really nothing more than a mind control contraption. Once you look at the image you'll be forever wanting to send me all of your money so whatever you do DON'T LOOK at this image of a mind control contraption..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160419_215740.jpg)

The clamps symbolize the iron grip I have over all of your minds..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 20, 2016, 12:04:52 PM
You can't get an iron grip on Jello.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: stromboli on April 20, 2016, 01:36:34 PM
You can't get an iron grip on Jello.

Da Bum Ti- never mind.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 20, 2016, 05:36:49 PM
Half of the bench top, 8 2x4s.. I almost  ran out of glue just as I was finishing up on the 8th one.. That would have sucked..  8 more to go and it's assembly time!  Weeeeeeee! Things better damned well fit right..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160420_173049.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 21, 2016, 07:05:50 AM
  Things better damned well fit right..  [/img]
What could possibly go wrong?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 21, 2016, 10:10:35 PM
Got the last of the glueups done so now it's planing endlessly for a few days.
Go figure that the ONLY board I found with no knots at all I cut too short..oh well..
Somehow I have to find the space to assemble this thing before taking out the old bench. I'm going to need that for assembly.. .
I did a quick estimation of total weight.  Somewhere I read that the average dry 2x4 weighs about 1.21 pounds per foot.  I reckon about 165 total board feet so somewhere around 200 pounds.. It's not a snatch n grab item..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 22, 2016, 07:10:31 PM
It's about ready for assembly. This has been a long project with a lot of work and it's still not done. I'll be doing a lot of planing to smooth it all down, but I feel good about it all going together ok.. I really need to clean up the shop and make some space in here.  It's definitely going to need some wheels being over 200 pounds..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 23, 2016, 05:18:34 PM
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160423_170559.jpg)
Got the first fit up done.. I still need to cut new leg wedges and bolt it up and the tool well is too wide, but it's almost there.. Still a boatload of planing to do..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 25, 2016, 01:41:20 AM
So anyway..The bench disassembled into the 5 components..2 legs (well 4 actually), 2 top sections and the tool well.. The only thing holding it together is glue, the 4 small wooden wedges and 4 quarter inch lag bolts.. That's it and it'll probably support the weight of a couple of engine blocks or so..
Ignore the rest of the mess.. The garage is in transition from messy to slightly less messy..maybe more messy then less messy someday..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160425_013101.jpg)
I'm moving things around and going to take apart a bunch of shelving just taking up space and tossing out a LOT OF junk..
Oh yeah..gotta move a bunch of crap out of the way to cut the grass tomorrow..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 26, 2016, 09:42:44 AM
That pile of lumber is  now my new workbench!  Weeee!
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160425_232148_1.jpg) the old one is in the background..
Now I'm almost afraid to get it dirty, but I will. 
Fuck! I just realized that this means I have to start making stuff or else.. The garage just got a little smaller..
We've decided that I need a scantily clad young and comely woman to pose on top of it for pictures..  I sure can't think of anything more reasonable than that..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Flanker1Six on April 26, 2016, 01:32:09 PM
That pile of lumber is  now my new workbench!  Weeee!
Now I'm almost afraid to get it dirty, but I will. 
Fuck! I just realized that this means I have to start making stuff or else.. The garage just got a little smaller..
We've decided that I need a scantily clad young and comely woman to pose on top of it for pictures..  I sure can't think of anything more reasonable than that..

Looks nice! 

Aaaahhhhh yes; smaller available space...............the downside of new stuff.  Try to be philosophical about it though.........................if it gets bad enough you can always try for a little extra cash from those guys at the Buried Alive reality show as a featured episode!   

As attractive as the scantily young woman scheme is; keep in mind that if you have any kind of current love interest.....................there are potential risks  :hang: involved!   Good luck!   
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 27, 2016, 06:55:15 PM
The scantily comely young woman posing was my gf's idea..  She's a bit on the heavy side and knows it, but that's irrelevant.. The chances of it happening are very close to zero..maybe less than that.. lol
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 28, 2016, 05:42:10 AM
I'm about to have a very large pile of birch lumber. We had the tree out front taken down the other day and found a guy with a portable saw mill to come to the house to cut it for me. The trunk is about 15 feet long and about 20 inches in diameter.  Next I'll have to find a suitable place to dry it flat where I can keep it out of the rain.
We're thinking about making new kitchen counter tops,  laminated birch a few inches thick.. This is a long term project because I know that the wood may take a few years to dry properly and I don't know what kind of warping, cupping, twisting, etc., might take place..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on May 04, 2016, 04:30:56 PM
Something to use the gazillion 2x4 scraps for, planter boxes for the front yard.. I glued and clamped the 2x4 edges together to form 2x10s, cut the edges in a rough box joint, glued screwed and painted them. I have 2 made now, but going to make several more as time permits..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160504_162243.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on May 14, 2016, 09:43:52 AM
Bought a nice little Makita circular saw for $30.. I don't have that many actual uses for it right now other than cutting the ragged edges off my workbench which is done, looks good and that's the story of my day.  Hold your excitement till later after I'm gone.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on May 22, 2016, 03:50:54 AM
I'm building a new bed frame with laminated 2x4 construction. I planed them down square, laminated the footboard and legs. It goes together tomorrow.
A few weeks ago I got my hands on an old Stanley Bailey #4 corogated plane. Best hand tool I've ever had.. it cuts perfect thin strips off every time without having to constantly readjust..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on July 04, 2016, 03:26:04 AM
So considering buying a biscuit cutting machine . I've never used one and from everything I read about them one of the great bargains now with biscuit cutting machines is the improved model by Harbor Freight for about $65. Toss in the 25% off coupon it's about $50.
Normally I wouldn't buy power equipment from HF after getting burned repeatedly, but I simply have not seen a single bad review of their newest biscuit cutter.
I've got several boards to join coming up on several projects so tomorrow I'm heading to HF..
Additional I think I finally have a product I believe will sell fairly well on Etsy. It's a small space saving table that fits under a mattress.
I made 2 for our bed and for cheap they're very sturdy and good looking. I figure I can sell them for about $80 per pair and should cost me about $6 to make, give or take a buck or two. These are items I can turn enough profit and perhaps be able to afford to actually use the RV. In the perfect world I'll have a mobile wood shop built into a trailer which is something we're considering to make items to sell in different towns along the way. I'm changing the corner brace look, but this little table will support about 60-70 pounds, not that many people are going to pile that much weight on an under the mattress table, but it's good to know it's going to last as opposed to cheap Chinese crap..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160603_192736.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on July 04, 2016, 10:28:07 AM
Nice design. I bought the dewalt biscuit tool a while ago. I've used it on a few projects and its worked great for me. So long as the tolerances are tight on the HF tool, it should work fine. You can do some real nice looking strong joinery with biscuits.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on July 10, 2016, 01:17:31 AM
I did buy one (biscuit joiner), but there are many better and stronger joints. The biscuit cutter makes it easy and quick, but not necessarily stronger.
Anyway this used to be a 70 inch 2x4. It's now a 3/4 inch x 12 inch by 35 inch board. I priced a similar board at home depot today premade.. $35.. The 2x4 cost $2.29. I used the table saw and biscuit joiner to make it.. It's going to be part of the baby's cradle.
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160709_212431.jpg)
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160709_204100.jpg)

I bought a 8 foot 2x6 today to see how far it'll go to making 3/4 inch boards

I had to plane it smooth because I forgot to reset the blade angle of the table saw to 90 degrees.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on July 16, 2016, 01:10:19 AM
Well,  so far I've gotten to this point in making the cradle for my daughter's soon to be next kid. It's going to be made entirely of 2x4 lumber except for the hardware (screws and the pivot) and I may add some walnut veneer highlights.
The toughest learning curve for me at least was making 3/4 inch boards from 2x4s, but I have it down fairly well now.  I still have one end piece to glue up and the tenons and mortises to cut, a LOT of sanding to do then assembly..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160716_005959.jpg)
It's loosely based on something similar to this pendulum cradle.
(http://lumberjocks.com/assets/pictures/projects/156534-438x.jpg?1281637696)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on July 19, 2016, 05:56:47 PM
Almost.. I still need to fix the pivots and tighten up the joints.. 
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160719_174752.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on July 19, 2016, 08:00:16 PM
Looks fabulous. What's the plan for finish? Paint stain or just clear?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on July 23, 2016, 05:07:44 AM
Looks fabulous. What's the plan for finish? Paint stain or just clear?
I'm leaving it plain to let my daughter decide later on..
I've reached an impasse of irrational fear when it comes to finally assembly. The pivot bolts fit very tight with the bearings and I'm afraid that the holes in the support frame aren't going to line up properly so its been 3 days just setting there daring me to make the next move .. I hate that part of assembly of a project where I'm unsure if everything is going to line up square. It either will or it won't ,but I have the irrational fear that it won't no matter how well I've assembled and planned and designed..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on July 24, 2016, 01:49:24 PM
Ok..pencil and a ruler fixed my fears.. it works..
https://youtu.be/9dnF7qgQzvE
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on July 24, 2016, 07:50:49 PM
Looks like everything lined up ok after all. Very nice. Your daughter is going to love it. Big time.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on July 26, 2016, 12:14:38 AM
Thanks johan.. It's got a lot of nicks and dings in it being pine and made of 2x4s, but it'll hold together and rock nice and smooth.. What I really like is it only cost about 15 bucks altogether.. if it was hardwood it would have been more like 100 bucks just for the lumber..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on August 04, 2016, 01:00:15 PM
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/image-20160804_125316.jpg)
Now all it needs is a crying, popping, peeing baby..It looks about half the size in the living room as it does in the work shop.. I have no idea why..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on August 26, 2016, 04:56:23 AM
So I got another new toy! It's a Ridgid R4331 13" Thickness planer I got on CL for $200 up in Charlotte NC. It retails around $375-550 and is pretty close to being brand new except there's no warranty, but for $200 I can live with it. 
This is going to save me untold hours planing things down and I just got a job to produce 5 new table tops for a local restaurant so right off the top it's going to pay for itself..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160826_044125.jpg) 
I'm going to build a foldable outfeed table and I really need to set up a dust collection system someday, but for now it'll work as is..
Next on my list is either a bandsaw or a wood lathe, but I'm more than likely going to build the lathe from parts..

You know..I never did get around to making that wooden geared clock yet, but this is one step closer to getting started on that project..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on August 26, 2016, 06:18:28 AM
Nice. That will make many projects much quicker and easier.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on August 26, 2016, 06:27:24 AM
b
Nice. That will make many projects much quicker and easier.
That's the plan..
I made this table top last week and had to hand plane and sand it.. it took me about 6 hours of work in 95°+ temperature.
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160817_200610.jpg)
With the planer I'm thinking more like about 15 minutes plus about 5 minutes of sanding.. Quite a bit of difference I'd say.. The only real issue I can think of is I'm going to have to learn to be a bit more patient waiting for glue to set up.  I really don't want to have to dig into the planer to scrape out semi wet glue.. lol
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: DeltaEpsilon on August 27, 2016, 02:03:07 PM
This fall I am going to build a double necked guitar like the one Jimmy Page uses (Gibson EDS-1275). I am quite looking forward to it.

@AllPurposeAtheist Have you ever built a guitar?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on September 19, 2016, 05:26:07 AM
This fall I am going to build a double necked guitar like the one Jimmy Page uses (Gibson EDS-1275). I am quite looking forward to it.

@AllPurposeAtheist Have you ever built a guitar?
I have not, but did think about it..Electric guitars are much easier to build than accoustic varieties..
I'd kind of like to get into doing inlay work with guitars and such. There's a guy on one of the wood forums I post on who does some pretty amazing inlay work..To bad he's into the churchy thing. Obviously he's blessed to be so talented.. 
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on September 19, 2016, 05:28:47 AM
One of about 15 doors I'm making to retrofit the RV before we sell it.
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/IMG_20160919_051933.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on September 19, 2016, 06:56:28 AM
Not much of a woodworking project, but technically it counts I guess. The old mailbox post got hit by a drunk last winter and we've had a temporary thing cemented into a 5gal bucket ever since. Finally got around to doing something more permanent.

It's 6x6 with a bit of 4x4 for the angled support. Some grooved 2x2 holds the address sign and that's a solar light on top. Not bad for a quickie project.

I made it look kinda like a cross just so the locals won't suspect they have heathens living in the neighborhood.

(http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m142/joe_gremlin/Mailbox%20Post_zpslnprh4dn.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: DeltaEpsilon on September 19, 2016, 07:40:01 AM
I have not, but did think about it..Electric guitars are much easier to build than accoustic varieties..
I'd kind of like to get into doing inlay work with guitars and such. There's a guy on one of the wood forums I post on who does some pretty amazing inlay work..To bad he's into the churchy thing. Obviously he's blessed to be so talented..

Ya. Alex Lifeson (Rush) and David Gilmour (Pink Floyd) are two very talented guitarists that are atheists. Alex Lifeson owns a Gibson EDS-1275. Besides God must have had to forgive Jimmy Page for a shit load of sins :).
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on September 19, 2016, 12:54:32 PM
Didja use a genuine mortise and tennon joint to hold it together or didja fake it?  Real men hand chisel motises and hand cut tennons with their bare fucking teeth! 
I have dentures so I use a saw.. lol
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on September 20, 2016, 06:39:27 PM
I totally cheated. No mortise or tennons, just a basic cross lap joint. And even with that joint I cheated. I probably coulda and shoulda tried my hand at chisel and hammer to make the pockets. Instead I borrowed my neighbors 10" sliding miter saw and used a depth stop to carve out the pockets one blade kerf at a time. I did use a hammer and chisel a bit to square things up and dial in the final size of the pockets.

The angled support uses no joinery. Just cut on 45's and glued and screwed. Even the pocket joint is glued and screwed with 4 stainless lags.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on October 04, 2016, 03:45:10 AM
Woohoo! I finally got a lathe. It's an oldie,but goodie, an old cast iron Craftsman probably made in the 40s..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20161004_032140.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: SGOS on October 04, 2016, 06:03:22 AM
Not much of a woodworking project, but technically it counts I guess. The old mailbox post got hit by a drunk last winter and we've had a temporary thing cemented into a 5gal bucket ever since. Finally got around to doing something more permanent.

It's 6x6 with a bit of 4x4 for the angled support. Some grooved 2x2 holds the address sign and that's a solar light on top. Not bad for a quickie project.

I made it look kinda like a cross just so the locals won't suspect they have heathens living in the neighborhood.

(http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m142/joe_gremlin/Mailbox%20Post_zpslnprh4dn.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/725x406q90/r/924/IbhkRk.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on October 04, 2016, 07:03:52 PM

(https://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/725x406q90/r/924/IbhkRk.jpg)
Nice! I'm going into production. The price just went up $450 and I bet they still sell like hotcakes!
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: SGOS on October 04, 2016, 08:14:48 PM
Nice! I'm going into production. The price just went up $450 and I bet they still sell like hotcakes!

Yep, price it high so you can advertise, "Be the envy of your neighbors, and score 'get into Heaven' coupons while you're at it.  Comes with a certificate of authenticity."
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on October 06, 2016, 09:36:50 AM
Not a bad week for me. I got a old used lathe for $100, an air compressor for about $120, an air nailer for $22 and a brand spanking new rip fence for the table saw for $115.
Had I bought all this stuff brand new from the usual sources at full retail I could have easily spent upwards of several thousand bucks, but I got it all for just over $400 after taxes and accessories..
I didn't figure in the price of air hose and fittings, boxes of air nailer nails, hinges for the lathe, gasoline to go get it all, etc., but all in all not a bad week..
My spiffy new rip fence..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20161006_082552.jpg)
If you want a pretty damn nice table saw consider a used craftsman in the 113.xxxxxxx series and the fence from searspartsdirect for $115. You can get a pretty decent used craftsman saw for around $100 or so and add the aftermarket fence, $115 or spend several hundred for a new saw at home depot that's a piece of crap. My suggestion for anyone wanting a decent saw is the used route and beef it up.. In fact I might just start buying up used craftsman saws and adding the fence to resell. I've seen a few for sale with the addon fences selling for $500 and up.. I haven't seen one going for under 500 yet..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on November 06, 2016, 04:08:25 AM
Nice! I'm going into production. The price just went up $450 and I bet they still sell like hotcakes!

I have a fish with brass street number hanging from my mailbox.  Never thought of a religious connection,   Might have to change that.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on November 06, 2016, 10:10:46 AM

My spiffy new rip fence..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20161006_082552.jpg)
If you want a pretty damn nice table saw consider a used craftsman in the 113.xxxxxxx series and the fence from searspartsdirect for $115. You can get a pretty decent used craftsman saw for around $100 or so and add the aftermarket fence, $115 or spend several hundred for a new saw at home depot that's a piece of crap. My suggestion for anyone wanting a decent saw is the used route and beef it up.. In fact I might just start buying up used craftsman saws and adding the fence to resell. I've seen a few for sale with the addon fences selling for $500 and up.. I haven't seen one going for under 500 yet..
An new aftermarket fence can take a so so table saw and turn it into a viable furniture grade shop tool. What brand did you get?

My first saw was an old Ridgid brand that I picked up from Craigslist. It was a great saw and I loved everything about it except the cast iron top. My shop tends to stay damp in the summer so I was constantly battling surface rust on the cast iron. I sold it and picked up a granite top Ridgid model from craigslist. It was essentially the same exact saw as my first one except it had a granite top that wouldn't rust or warp. But the fence design was completely different and completely crap. My first Ridgid saw and an awesome fence design that was dead on square and fairly easy to dial in accurately.

The granite top saw had a knock off of a biesemeyer type design but with some poorly implemented cost cutting changes that rendered the fence about useless for anything other than extremely rough cutting. I finally broke down and bought a Vega aftermarket fence for it. Its like night and day what that saw can do now.

One of these days I'm going to build a drop-down outfeed table on the back of it but otherwise I wouldn't change a thing.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on November 06, 2016, 12:08:09 PM
I got the Sears Align-a-rip mainly because of cost. It's not as accurate as some aftermarket fences, but the difference between it and the one that came with the saw is the difference between Franklin Roosevelt and Donald Trumpster fire.. I didn't have to drill any holes or tap anything.  I asked around a bunch of different woodworking sites. Turns out that quite a few production shops use it and seem very happy with it and it's about a quarter of the price of a lot of other aftermarket fences..
I have an older Sears slotted aluminum top. I don't really like it much, but on the other hand it doesn't rust so there's that trade off.. Right now I'm using my workbench as the outfeed and it's ok, but because of space limitations I don't really have room for a separate outfeed. I'd love to make one to extend the miter slots and still might someday if I can find the space for it. I use several types of different sleds for different applications..occasionally they want to fall off the edge if I'm cutting something heavy..
I read quite a bit about granite tops. Some guys love them and some not so much.
If I ever get the money together I'll probably get a sawstop model to save my fingers,  but I've only nicked my finger once with the blade. That didn't feel too spiffy.. 
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on November 06, 2016, 12:22:02 PM
Nice! I'm going into production. The price just went up $450 and I bet they still sell like hotcakes!
So contrary to popular belief Jesus wasn't a capenter, but a mail man? Who knew?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on November 06, 2016, 06:58:04 PM
Space for outfeed is an issue for me as well. Don't ask me to find the link now, but I stumbled on a page once where a guy with the same saw I have built a collapsable out feed for his. It looked like a fairly simple project. A simple 1x3 frame with an MDF top. Attached to the rear of the saw with a hinge and then a couple fold under legs on the rear edge of the table. When its folded down, the saw takes up no more space than it already does. But when its time to use the saw, fold out the table and drop the legs and instant out feed table. Like I said, this was an example someone did on the saw I have. But I see no reason why you couldn't do it just about any roll-around table saw. The only tricky bit is to jigger the framing and hinge position so the table top ends up far enough out to allow space for the rear fence rail and ends up at the same height as the saw table when you fold it out.

Now that I'm writing this, I'm realizing I need to stop putting this project off and do it ASAP. Having no real out feed solution is an issue almost every time I use the saw. My current project is building a couple clone high end recording microphones so I'm not really in woodworking mode right now. But this out feed mod will definitely make a nice little weekend project this winter.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on November 11, 2016, 05:44:46 AM
I have a big Delta 220V tablesaw with an extension, a router extension on the other side and a wonderful Inca fence on side runners.  On lockable wheels.  LOL!
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on December 02, 2016, 03:20:40 AM
Built a hinged clamp rack the other day.  It ain't pretty, but gets them organized and up off the floor and workbench..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20161202_031301.jpg)
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20161202_031347.jpg)
I'm pretty sure that by next year this time I'll have to expand it or rebuild it to accommodate twice as many.
My son and I are going to give a go at supplying various apartment complex management companies with custom cabinetry.. Not fancy stuff, but good quality at better prices. One item that just one company buys runs about $600 and we can build them for about $38 in material.. They currently buy around 10 a month, but they also manage 1000s of units in Ohio and the east coast..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on December 02, 2016, 03:29:14 AM
Built a hinged clamp rack the other day.  It ain't pretty, but gets them organized and up off the floor and workbench..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20161202_031301.jpg)
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20161202_031347.jpg)
I'm pretty sure that by next year this time I'll have to expand it or rebuild it to accommodate twice as many.
My son and I are going to give a go at supplying various apartment complex management companies with custom cabinetry.. Not fancy stuff, but good quality at better prices. One item that just one company buys runs about $600 and we can build them for about $38 in material.. They currently buy around 10 a month, but they also manage 1000s of units in Ohio and the east coast..

I really need to make a decent clamp board!  That's a good one.  I have all mine upside down clamped to the workbench overhang.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on December 02, 2016, 03:31:16 AM
I also built some new cabinets for the shop.. Again, not pretty,  but sturdy and gets stuff off the ground and tables.. Removable with french cleats. Yup, one is upside down and apt to remain upside down..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20161130_164824.jpg)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on December 02, 2016, 03:37:10 AM
I have a big Delta 220V tablesaw with an extension, a router extension on the other side and a wonderful Inca fence on side runners.  On lockable wheels.  LOL!
Nice setup, but for my money I'll stick with affordable. Most of what Delta sells now days is all made in China with inferior materials. That's one company quickly losing customers. They used to make great stuff..the operative term there, used to.. If I ever buy an expensive table saw it'll be either Sawstop or Powermatic, but for now it's pre 80s craftsman with the align-a-rip fence..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on December 02, 2016, 03:43:38 AM
Clamp board/rack is pretty easy to make. Use plenty of glue and nails and remember to use wedges for support.  Clamps get heavy when you have about 30...
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20161202_034533.jpg)
Here's what I meant by wedges.. Just support all that weight.
That's made from old crap furniture mdf sitting out in the shed .
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on December 02, 2016, 04:31:13 AM
Nice setup, but for my money I'll stick with affordable. Most of what Delta sells now days is all made in China with inferior materials. That's one company quickly losing customers. They used to make great stuff..the operative term there, used to.. If I ever buy an expensive table saw it'll be either Sawstop or Powermatic, but for now it's pre 80s craftsman with the align-a-rip fence..

Yeah, but I bought mine 15 years ago US-made and added a router extension and Incra fence and on lockable wheels.  A real jewel!
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on December 05, 2016, 04:58:46 AM
Something to consider CV when making your clamp rack and a lesson I had to learn the hard way is if you make one with slots like mine for individual clamps (I have two rows of slots, top and bottom) cut both the top and bottom slots together so they match. If you don't you'll likely end up with a situation where the clamps bind and don't fit well. Also don't make the bracing like this POS I first made because it'll sag to the weight of the clamps.
You can see how by not cutting the slots in pairs things just don't line up right. It might be ok if you measure perfect, but who does that right the first time every time? Ha!   
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20161205_044111.jpg)
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20161205_044823.jpg)
Yeah, I know..measure twice, cut once and all that, but in the real world we forget..
DAMMIT! Compressor kicked in at 4am and scared the bajebus out of me! 
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on December 05, 2016, 06:42:17 PM

My son and I are going to give a go at supplying various apartment complex management companies with custom cabinetry.. Not fancy stuff, but good quality at better prices. One item that just one company buys runs about $600 and we can build them for about $38 in material.. They currently buy around 10 a month, but they also manage 1000s of units in Ohio and the east coast..
Those are attractive numbers. If the competition is selling for $600 what to do you think your retail will be? And how much time will each one take?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on December 06, 2016, 02:53:41 AM
They're not real complicated at all, but I figure at most an hour or two to make and that's if I have to build each one from scratch without a pattern at about $2-300 each  plus expenses. They've already told him they'll pay shipping which they already do. I don't even have to assemble them, just dry fit and ship. I can live with a few hundred bucks an hour. It beats fast food every single day of the year.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on December 06, 2016, 02:55:37 AM
https://miterset.myshopify.com  Something for my shopping list someday soon...  These little suckers are pretty amazingly accurate and simple..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on December 06, 2016, 07:36:55 PM
They're not real complicated at all, but I figure at most an hour or two to make and that's if I have to build each one from scratch without a pattern at about $2-300 each  plus expenses. They've already told him they'll pay shipping which they already do. I don't even have to assemble them, just dry fit and ship. I can live with a few hundred bucks an hour. It beats fast food every single day of the year.
That's a very respectable profit margin. I hope it comes together for you.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on December 06, 2016, 07:38:15 PM
https://miterset.myshopify.com  Something for my shopping list someday soon...  These little suckers are pretty amazingly accurate and simple..
I haven't seen those before. Simple and accurate. Brilliant.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on December 09, 2016, 06:31:14 AM
Oh man, shipping unassembled repeat-cut parts is great!
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on February 15, 2017, 01:02:40 AM
Well, the company my son works for nixed the notion of me building their stuff. They'd rather pay double for inferior products.. Oh well..
In the meantime I'm working on developing a few other items that seem to sell very well for a few other people I know who sell on Edsy and other venues..I'm also working on a few alternative sharpening products to sell to other woodworking enthusiasts..
I found that I can buy a 6"x2" diamond sharpening stone for about $6-8 all day long, but go from 6x2 to 8x3 and the price jumps to about $60-80... Ten times the price for just 2" more? That's crazy, but it's what they get away with.
Meanwhile I found a company that sells the same type of diamond coated material in larger sheets, but it's not connected to any kind of backing plate so it's thinner and less usable so...I figured I might just capture a segment of the market by assembling the various grits to my own material and selling it for much less than the companies selling for the high dollar. I can get 7x2.5 sheets and get several different grits from 120 up to about 3000 grit for around $6 which I can fasten to a hard, flat surface for much less than $60-80..
Right now I have an order for 5 or 6 grits to test out and if they perform as good as the expensive brands I'm in business..  It hasn't arrived so I'm still waiting, but I'm cautiously optimistic..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on February 15, 2017, 01:44:33 AM
Well, the company my son works for nixed the notion of me building their stuff. They'd rather pay double for inferior products.. Oh well..
In the meantime I'm working on developing a few other items that seem to sell very well for a few other people I know who sell on Edsy and other venues..I'm also working on a few alternative sharpening products to sell to other woodworking enthusiasts..
I found that I can buy a 6"x2" diamond sharpening stone for about $6-8 all day long, but go from 6x2 to 8x3 and the price jumps to about $60-80... Ten times the price for just 2" more? That's crazy, but it's what they get away with.
Meanwhile I found a company that sells the same type of diamond coated material in larger sheets, but it's not connected to any kind of backing plate so it's thinner and less usable so...I figured I might just capture a segment of the market by assembling the various grits to my own material and selling it for much less than the companies selling for the high dollar. I can get 7x2.5 sheets and get several different grits from 120 up to about 3000 grit for around $6 which I can fasten to a hard, flat surface for much less than $60-80..
Right now I have an order for 5 or 6 grits to test out and if they perform as good as the expensive brands I'm in business..  It hasn't arrived so I'm still waiting, but I'm cautiously optimistic..

I'm a bit confusing here.  Are you proposing a new business and wanting investors?  Or just upset at your son?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 21, 2017, 06:31:22 AM
https://miterset.myshopify.com  Something for my shopping list someday soon...  These little suckers are pretty amazingly accurate and simple..
I finally purchased a Miterset standard version.. This little fucker is amazing.. Before I could never quite get a perfect 45° angle cut, but now it's really easy even with the old miter gauge that came with my old crapman table saw.. It's worth every penny especially if you're cutting expensive lumber such as walnut or other hardwood..For that matter it's just about replaced my crosscut sled.. Before I could never get a perfect 90° angle with the miter gauge either.. Now it's perfect every time.. 
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20170405_142743.jpg)
My latest creation..a towel rack..
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20170419_201204.jpg)
The bathroom lighting is horrible so it shows every single flaw, but the 45° angles are dead on..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 21, 2017, 06:42:09 AM
Just for arguments sake..The walnut lumber I purchased for this towel rack cost over $70. The stuff ain't cheap..The miterset was $65. If I hadn't used the miterset I'd have likely wasted a few feet of lumber trying to zero in on the 45° angles or I wouldn't have bothered trying. I got the angles right the first time with almost no waste. That's worth the $65..
Next up, probably some segmented bowls. I'll practice with cheap lumber first then if all goes well more expensive hardwood..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on April 26, 2017, 10:51:43 PM
Woot! I dropped down $200 for an almost new Ridgid 14" bandsaw. They have a bad rap for vibration, but the guy I got it from fixed that issue.
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20170426_183809.jpg)
This is a game changer for things I've been wanting to do..Snazzy table and chair legs, rocking chairs, resawing and so forth.
I've become a big fan of craigslist for hunting for tools and equipment. Just keep looking every time you are looking for a good deal.  I've been waiting over a year now for a great deal on a bandsaw and finally got it.. That's birch wood,  about as hard as maple and it cut through it like warm butter..
I'm a happy guy now.
For those going through depression you might want to consider taking up woodworking.  It'll keep your mind occupied and give you a decent sense of accomplishment.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Sorginak on April 26, 2017, 10:53:00 PM
I commend any artist who creates with his hands.  Being an artist is one of the harshest professions in this world. 
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on April 27, 2017, 07:44:24 AM
But getting back to the scantily clad young lady...
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Johan on April 27, 2017, 06:25:29 PM
Nice. A bandsaw is on my wish list. How did the previous owner fix the vibration issue?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Mike Cl on May 05, 2017, 09:37:57 AM

For those going through depression you might want to consider taking up woodworking.  It'll keep your mind occupied and give you a decent sense of accomplishment.
That is a great solution!  I use the same idea, only with computer games and reading, to keep my mind occupied.  Your solution is practical in that you have a practical item when you are finished with a project.  I don't.  But that's okay, games do keep me out of other people's hair.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on May 09, 2017, 04:20:11 AM
Some people are artistic with wood.  My Grampa carved a whale and a greyhound.  My Dad made an eagle (I have them as keepsakes).  I do not have that talent.  To me, a block of wood does not have a figure waiting to be released from it.

I like making practical things.  A 2 level deck.  A 200' stepped shadowbox fence.  A wall-mounted 3-tier shoe rack.  A wall mounted 3-tier hat rack.  Shelves.  A garden shed.  Framed flower and veggie beds...

I don't lack imagination.  I read and write science fiction and fantasy.  I write poems.  I write haiku.  I cat-blog.

But I am just boringly practical when it comes to wood.  LOL!
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Munch on May 09, 2017, 10:05:29 PM
Not woodwork, but similar, after meeting a lot of extended family at the funeral and wake of my great-aunt, I meet my second cousin once removed, who was a black Smith and artisan, who made a career out of warping and bending metalwork works of art, similar to this.

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/1c/c9/c5/1cc9c5e581286f6b760854deaf51856e.jpg)

The way he described it gave me a good appreciation for metalwork and its craft.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on May 29, 2017, 08:13:10 AM
Nice. A bandsaw is on my wish list. How did the previous owner fix the vibration issue?
Well, he really didn't. It still vibrates, but I can live with it for the most part, but I do need to fix a few issues.
I have the wheels pretty even, but someday I need to remove the rubber dampeners from between the base and the saw itself. I did manage to break a 3/8th" blade recently..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on May 31, 2017, 12:09:12 PM
Well, he really didn't. It still vibrates, but I can live with it for the most part, but I do need to fix a few issues.
I have the wheels pretty even, but someday I need to remove the rubber dampeners from between the base and the saw itself. I did manage to break a 3/8th" blade recently..

Have you tried a linked belt?  A friend changed his to that and it helped.  I use one on my floor drill  press and riding mower.  It takes some work to get it adjusted right, but it seems to be worth it afterwards.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: trdsf on May 31, 2017, 03:30:24 PM
I put together a flat-pack bookcase yesterday, which for me is as close as I get to woodworking.  It's a skill I wish I had; my uncle was a genuine artisan and I have a couple of his better pieces.  I'd be happy to even manage the practical, never mind the artistic.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on June 07, 2017, 04:03:58 AM
I put together a flat-pack bookcase yesterday, which for me is as close as I get to woodworking.  It's a skill I wish I had; my uncle was a genuine artisan and I have a couple of his better pieces.  I'd be happy to even manage the practical, never mind the artistic.

I'm building a 2-bin compost bin right now.  Designed it myself.  Some parts by measurement, some by craft-fitting.  I'm no artisan, just a practical builder.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on June 09, 2017, 05:01:48 AM
I guess an update on what I've been up to in the shop may be in order if anyone gives a rats ass and frankly I won't blame anyone who doesn't..
Well, anyways..I decided to start giving something back to organizations who have helped me in the past. The furniture bank helped me out once and is a national organization that provides furniture to people getting back on their feet so I'm making limited amounts of furniture to give to them to distribute locally. Here's one chair I recently built and its been a real learning experience. I'll add the seat part later after the other chair is finished along with the table yet to be made.
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20170601_213255.jpg)
As I learned there's a lot more to building chairs than people realize..
That single chair came from a single 2x6 so the material cost for the wooden frame was just $4.50 for the lumber. The thing that I don't like about it is it's made from the cheap lightweight  species commonly called eastern white pine so the next is made from a 2x10 of southern yellow pine which is much harder and heavier wood with a much more distinct grain pattern. The cost is about the same.
I recently found a guy locally who owns his own sawmill and he is willing to sell me yellow pine for 50 cent per board feet.  Just to give you an idea..these are undressed boards, actual 2 inches by 4 inches instead of the dimensional stuff sold in stores (1.5" x 3.5") so.. An 8'-2x4 has 5.3 board feet.  That's about $2.65 for a real 2x4 instead of $3.50 for the shaved down stuff sold in stores.. Also he'll sell me white and red oak for $3 per bf which is WAYYYY cheaper than anything sold at home depot or lowes who sell it by the linier foot. A board foot of oak at the box stores probably runs around $10-12 per bf..  in case you're wondering 1 board foot is measured 12 inches by 12 inches by 1 inch..
He also sells the ever popular live edge lumber which in stores is through the roof. He quoted me a 2" slab, 5' long for under $100.. in stores that's around $500.. Live edge tables sell for the BIG $$$.. Live edge just means that the bark isn't dawn off the edge.  If you want to see what live edge tables are selling for take a gender at just some of the stuff selling on Edsy.. https://www.etsy.com/listing/260492401/9-live-edge-table-single-slab-boardroom?utm_campaign=shopping_us_TreeGreenTeam_sfc_osa&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&utm_custom1=0&utm_content=7154327&gclid=CjwKEAjwjunJBRDzl6iCpoKS4G0SJACJAx-Vx9dtnjY0qPrPC65rSN-Y20_ALFsZ-s3xERLtiui3GhoChC7w_wcB
I'm not going to be giving away $6,000 tables, but I might start building and selling them..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on June 09, 2017, 05:07:11 AM
Oh yeah, just something I made today to make life easier.. It's a tapering jig for making tapered legs for tables and chairs which can also be used to get a near perfect edge to a board that isn't quite straight. 
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20170608_171503.jpg)
In case you're wondering, those small wood pieces at the bottom of the rear bolts are homemade oak nuts. I was short two 3/8-16 nuts so I drilled a 5/16" hole then threaded through with the 3/8" bolts.  It ain't fancy, but it works..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on June 12, 2017, 06:04:04 AM
So I decided that if I ever decide to start selling my wood chairs my ad will say,  "Guaranteed that Joe Cartright ain't getting back up if you beat him over the head in a saloon brawl with my chairs! Even Hoss ain't getting back up"
Funny thing those old TV Westerns.. You would think that nobody back in the 1800s knew a damned thing about furniture construction, but the truth is most furniture in those days used what's referred to as through tenon construction and that stuff didn't just fall apart getting slapped over someone's shoulder. Chances are those kinds of violent actions would've been lethal. Ever seen someone get hit with a chair?  It ain't pretty.. lol
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on June 14, 2017, 06:45:41 AM
I guess an update on what I've been up to in the shop may be in order if anyone gives a rats ass and frankly I won't blame anyone who doesn't..
Well, anyways..I decided to start giving something back to organizations who have helped me in the past. The furniture bank helped me out once and is a national organization that provides furniture to people getting back on their feet so I'm making limited amounts of furniture to give to them to distribute locally. Here's one chair I recently built and its been a real learning experience. I'll add the seat part later after the other chair is finished along with the table yet to be made.
(http://i1160.photobucket.com/albums/q490/atheola/20170601_213255.jpg)
As I learned there's a lot more to building chairs than people realize..
That single chair came from a single 2x6 so the material cost for the wooden frame was just $4.50 for the lumber. The thing that I don't like about it is it's made from the cheap lightweight  species commonly called eastern white pine so the next is made from a 2x10 of southern yellow pine which is much harder and heavier wood with a much more distinct grain pattern. The cost is about the same.
I recently found a guy locally who owns his own sawmill and he is willing to sell me yellow pine for 50 cent per board feet.  Just to give you an idea..these are undressed boards, actual 2 inches by 4 inches instead of the dimensional stuff sold in stores (1.5" x 3.5") so.. An 8'-2x4 has 5.3 board feet.  That's about $2.65 for a real 2x4 instead of $3.50 for the shaved down stuff sold in stores.. Also he'll sell me white and red oak for $3 per bf which is WAYYYY cheaper than anything sold at home depot or lowes who sell it by the linier foot. A board foot of oak at the box stores probably runs around $10-12 per bf..  in case you're wondering 1 board foot is measured 12 inches by 12 inches by 1 inch..
He also sells the ever popular live edge lumber which in stores is through the roof. He quoted me a 2" slab, 5' long for under $100.. in stores that's around $500.. Live edge tables sell for the BIG $$$.. Live edge just means that the bark isn't dawn off the edge.  If you want to see what live edge tables are selling for take a gender at just some of the stuff selling on Edsy.. https://www.etsy.com/listing/260492401/9-live-edge-table-single-slab-boardroom?utm_campaign=shopping_us_TreeGreenTeam_sfc_osa&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&utm_custom1=0&utm_content=7154327&gclid=CjwKEAjwjunJBRDzl6iCpoKS4G0SJACJAx-Vx9dtnjY0qPrPC65rSN-Y20_ALFsZ-s3xERLtiui3GhoChC7w_wcB
I'm not going to be giving away $6,000 tables, but I might start building and selling them..

It's a lovely chair.  But I know people who would plop down on it and break it to bits.  There are no diagonal supports.  I mention that only because I built a porch swing very much like that and it failed the first hard "sit". 
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on September 09, 2017, 04:31:14 AM
Probably had to do with the details of your construction CB..
Few chairs have diagonal parts. They do however have curved back legs which helps distribute weight better. There's a lot of little details in chair construction most people just don't know about.  I use 3/8" oak dowels, 2 in each joint about 3/4 inch deep in each side, but you can use tenon and mortise or similar to dowels, floating tenons..

Anyway, I've finally settled on making weed stash boxes and have a logo I'm going to burn into the tops of them.
They're just simple hardwood boxes with simple,  straightforward dado joinery. The selling point really isn't the box itself, it's the logo and the idea of them being weed stash boxes or as my logo says, Weedstache boxes.. Easy to assemble and strong enough to hold dried marijuana.. lol
I'd post a picture, but that fucking image sharing service decided to shit all over everyone who has been using their free service for years..  fuck photobucket.. lol
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on September 11, 2017, 04:21:56 AM
Probably had to do with the details of your construction CB..
Few chairs have diagonal parts. They do however have curved back legs which helps distribute weight better. There's a lot of little details in chair construction most people just don't know about.  I use 3/8" oak dowels, 2 in each joint about 3/4 inch deep in each side, but you can use tenon and mortise or similar to dowels, floating tenons..

Anyway, I've finally settled on making weed stash boxes and have a logo I'm going to burn into the tops of them.
They're just simple hardwood boxes with simple,  straightforward dado joinery. The selling point really isn't the box itself, it's the logo and the idea of them being weed stash boxes or as my logo says, Weedstache boxes.. Easy to assemble and strong enough to hold dried marijuana.. lol
I'd post a picture, but that fucking image sharing service decided to shit all over everyone who has been using their free service for years..  fuck photobucket.. lol

Maybe I should have specified that two 200 pound people jumped up and landed on the porch swing I built at the same time.  I wasn't prepared for THAT!

Still it was a failure.

Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: fencerider on September 26, 2017, 12:33:18 AM
This post is already getting long. Not sure if I should start a new post on wood working....

I mentioned a few pages ago that I like going to youtube to learn new tricks that I didnt learn while working with cabinets on the job. (all thos jigs for routers and table saws)

I was looking into refinishing; something I never did; and discovered this wonderful thing called wood dye. Stains are solid particles of color that are suspended in a medium and applied to the surface of the wood. Because they don't dissolve they mostly stay on the surface. However dye dissolves completely in water so it can penetrate into the wood (It's how they get the cool look on electric guitars) Because they go farther than the surface dye can give rich color or just a tint. After it dries stain can be applied on top of it. So far I've found 3 brands that make dye specifically for wood (comes with the price tag).

After spending the weekend on this subject I came to realize any water soluble dye can be used ( I am not sure if there are any oil dyes or if they are all pigments). People have used food color to create their wooden masterpiece. Well I think I got overloaded to think you can also use hair dye to color wood. The only bad part is that all these brilliant colors are sensitive to UV light so you have to put a UV protection in the finish....
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on September 28, 2017, 03:13:22 AM
This post is already getting long. Not sure if I should start a new post on wood working....

I mentioned a few pages ago that I like going to youtube to learn new tricks that I didnt learn while working with cabinets on the job. (all thos jigs for routers and table saws)

I was looking into refinishing; something I never did; and discovered this wonderful thing called wood dye. Stains are solid particles of color that are suspended in a medium and applied to the surface of the wood. Because they don't dissolve they mostly stay on the surface. However dye dissolves completely in water so it can penetrate into the wood (It's how they get the cool look on electric guitars) Because they go farther than the surface dye can give rich color or just a tint. After it dries stain can be applied on top of it. So far I've found 3 brands that make dye specifically for wood (comes with the price tag).

After spending the weekend on this subject I came to realize any water soluble dye can be used ( I am not sure if there are any oil dyes or if they are all pigments). People have used food color to create their wooden masterpiece. Well I think I got overloaded to think you can also use hair dye to color wood. The only bad part is that all these brilliant colors are sensitive to UV light so you have to put a UV protection in the finish....

Um, this may sound strange.  I have a split foyer house.  Which means a half stair up to effectively a ranch house and a half stair down to an above ground basement the same size.  It's weird.  But it means there is a half-height wall along the upper half stair. 

I would like to build a wood box the 12' length of the half-height wall, set some fluorescent lights in it and hang it from the ceiling with hang plants below.

I want the box shiny jet black and unaffected by heat from the bulbs.  What kind of finish?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: fencerider on September 30, 2017, 11:16:40 PM
I put together a flat-pack bookcase yesterday, which for me is as close as I get to woodworking.  It's a skill I wish I had; my uncle was a genuine artisan and I have a couple of his better pieces.  I'd be happy to even manage the practical, never mind the artistic.
Hey you accomplished something!!! - I assembled all manner of cabinets as a job for 3 1/2 years. Sometimes customers would ask me to put together something they got at Home Depot or Ikea. The directions they give are confusing as hell. I put things together a whole lot faster when I threw the directions away and just looked at the parts.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: fencerider on September 30, 2017, 11:29:21 PM
Um, this may sound strange.  I have a split foyer house.  Which means a half stair up to effectively a ranch house and a half stair down to an above ground basement the same size.  It's weird.  But it means there is a half-height wall along the upper half stair. 

I would like to build a wood box the 12' length of the half-height wall, set some fluorescent lights in it and hang it from the ceiling with hang plants below.

I want the box shiny jet black and unaffected by heat from the bulbs.  What kind of finish?

I've been in a few town houses like that half floor down to the garage and half floor up to the main floor. There are actually quite a few around Los Angeles. The authors houses in Beverly Hills outside the gated communities. Hills around here have some crazy houses. ... and Ventura, the garage is on top of the living room and the rest of the house goes down the hill.

If you're not picky about finish, there are high temperature paints available in some places. Black is one of the most popular colors (for stage lights in theaters). I don't remember if they have it at Home Depot or Lowes. If you want a finish not sure... fluorescent lights not usually that hot from far away, but if you're using them as a grow light it might get warm
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on October 01, 2017, 01:53:59 AM
I've been in a few town houses like that half floor down to the garage and half floor up to the main floor. There are actually quite a few around Los Angeles. The authors houses in Beverly Hills outside the gated communities. Hills around here have some crazy houses. ... and Ventura the garage is on top of the living room and the rest to the house goes down the hill.

If you're not picky about finish, there are high temperature paints available in some places. Black is one of the most popular colors (for stage lights in theaters). I don't remember if they have it at Home Depot or Lowes. If you want a finish not sure Fluorescent lights not usually that hot from far away, but if you're using them as a grow light it might get warm

I had in mind a black box (13' now that I actually measure it) so there would 3 4'f 2 bulb fluorescent growlight fixtures in it.  The black wood box heavily finished.  Just large enough to prevent heat causing a problem.  Deep enough to direct most light below to hanging plants.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: fencerider on October 01, 2017, 02:22:15 AM
In general you want the properties of an exterior finish. Most important is UV protection. Most of the big brands have a clear coat with UV protection.

I found this brand in a forum by someone that has an outside deck in Arizona
https://www.flood.com/search
search cwf

I don't know that that one is any better than deft or minwax

Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on October 01, 2017, 02:26:40 AM
In general you want the properties of an exterior finish. Most important is UV protection. Most of the big brands have a clear coat with UV protection.

I found this brand in a forum by someone that has an outside deck in Arizona
https://www.flood.com/search
search cwf

I don't know that that one is any better than deft or minwax

Something like shiny black varnish finish.  But my only experience with black paint and varnish as a teen left a gummy finish that refused to dry.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: fencerider on October 01, 2017, 02:41:01 AM
I missed the part about you using the boxes as a light fixture. Here are a few more links for high temp finish

https://www.technolit.de/App/WebObjects/XSeMIPS.woa/cms/page/pid.102.104.271/agid.552.553.5038/lg.en/ecm.ag/Clear-varnish-heat-resistant.html

http://www.vhtpaint.com/high-heat/vht-flameproof-coating

http://www.deco-color.com/products_en/high_temperature.html

https://m.delcity.net/store/High-Heat-Primers-and-Lacquers/p_803480.h_803481

Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on October 01, 2017, 02:45:59 AM
I missed the part about you using the boxes as a light fixture. Here are a few more links for high temp finish

https://www.technolit.de/App/WebObjects/XSeMIPS.woa/cms/page/pid.102.104.271/agid.552.553.5038/lg.en/ecm.ag/Clear-varnish-heat-resistant.html

http://www.vhtpaint.com/high-heat/vht-flameproof-coating

http://www.deco-color.com/products_en/high_temperature.html

https://m.delcity.net/store/High-Heat-Primers-and-Lacquers/p_803480.h_803481
Thank you.  Bookmarked a couple.  You think they would be good for renewing a smoker/grill?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: fencerider on October 01, 2017, 02:52:25 AM
I saw a couple, but maybe not those links. If you mean the outside, one of those was listed at 650F. There are metal paints made for repainting car engines (maybe Autozone). If you mean the grill where you put the food... not a good idea to paint the food rack.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on October 01, 2017, 03:04:17 AM
I saw a couple, but maybe not those links. If you mean the outside, one of those was listed at 650F. There are metal paints made for repainting car engines (maybe Autozone). If you mean the grill where you put the food... not a good idea to paint the food rack.

Ack.  OK, The outsides of a lightbox supporting interior lights over a rack of hanging houseplants.  And about the grill; the outside after wirebrushing off some rust where the heat inside wouldn't peel off the new paint on the outside.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: fencerider on October 01, 2017, 03:09:38 AM
there is also a product called stove bright made for the exterior of a stove. It says specifically it is not food safe so only on the outside.

I found a few places that can do a food safe high temp finish, but none of them are take home products. Have to go to a service center to do it...
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on October 01, 2017, 03:13:01 AM
there is also a product called stove bright made for the exterior of a stove. It says specifically it is not food safe so only on the outside.

I found a few places that can do a food safe high temp finish, but none of them are take home products. Have to go to a service center to do it...

There is a 'woodstove and hearth' business nearby.  I think I will visit them to see what they have for paint.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: fencerider on October 01, 2017, 03:18:00 AM
http://www.instituteofman.com/2011/04/04/acts-of-manliness-how-to-refurbish-or-recondition-at-bbq-smoker/

a little diy
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on October 01, 2017, 03:30:50 AM
http://www.instituteofman.com/2011/04/04/acts-of-manliness-how-to-refurbish-or-recondition-at-bbq-smoker/

a little diy

Useful.  Printed the article.  My red ink is out, but the pictures are sufficient.  LOL! 
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on November 08, 2017, 02:40:15 PM
I'm supposed to be getting my branding iron delivered today.  I'm currently making and plan on selling boxes I call Weedstache Box(es)..
I have about 30 boxes made and ready to go and if they sell well I can scale up to produce about 10-20 a day and many more if I have help. My son may decide to move here to help. Between the two of us we can probably knock out about 50-75 a day if they sell well enough.. If we get to that point we will likely branch out, rent a shop and start producing other things.
We've talked about making cabinets for big apartment complexes. They're easy to build once you have the right setup and equipment.
Right now I'm still using my old Crapman table saw, but I'm definitely eyeballing a cabinet saw. I'd like to go with a Sawstop saw for the safety aspect. I'd really love to never have to worry about chopping off a finger or so.. 

One box minus the lid.. It's Caribbean Walnut or Tzasam with just a coating of boiled linseed oil on it..
(https://imageshack.com/i/poRWwOrdj) It's a beautiful wood with really nice grain patterns.. Kind of pricey, but not too expensive..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on November 09, 2017, 08:04:27 PM
Finally received my branding iron for putting my design on the boxes I make.. I have a bit of a learning curve to go through with various wood species I use.  Certain softwood and hardwood burn faster and I have to make sure the surface is really flat.
The iron I have is electric, but can also be heated with gas heat as well and I have a digital infrared thermometer on order to make sure I have the right temperature for various woods..
So here's the design.. You don't have to like it, but I do.. If you're interested in ordering one of my famous boxes (or two or 50!) let me know and I'll give board members a discount.  $15 instead of my regular asking price of $20.
Remember, you're not buying the steak, you're buying the sizzle. lol
Boxes are appx 6" long x 3" high x 3" wide and it varies a bit because of sanding and other factors..
 (https://imageshack.com/i/pmqjOFluj)
This one is a practice box.. Cedar..The top wasn't completely flat so there are weak spots. And I had resanded the top of this one so the finish doesn't match well.
You get the idea..
Here's a much better burn on a piece of plywood. I have a lot of practice ahead to get proficient at this..
(https://imageshack.com/i/poIb0LmZj)
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on November 09, 2017, 08:49:58 PM
Just did a quick search for a cheapo propane torch head and man! They've really jumped up in price since the last one I bought.. Maybe it's just me and I imagined that I didn't pay much last time or maybe it's been 20 years since I bought the last one I just forgot how much they used to cost..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on November 11, 2017, 12:03:48 AM
Finally received my branding iron for putting my design on the boxes I make.. I have a bit of a learning curve to go through with various wood species I use.  Certain softwood and hardwood burn faster and I have to make sure the surface is really flat.
The iron I have is electric, but can also be heated with gas heat as well and I have a digital infrared thermometer on order to make sure I have the right temperature for various woods..
So here's the design.. You don't have to like it, but I do.. If you're interested in ordering one of my famous boxes (or two or 50!) let me know and I'll give board members a discount.  $15 instead of my regular asking price of $20.
Remember, you're not buying the steak, you're buying the sizzle. lol
Boxes are appx 6" long x 3" high x 3" wide and it varies a bit because of sanding and other factors..
 (https://imageshack.com/i/pmqjOFluj)
This one is a practice box.. Cedar..The top wasn't completely flat so there are weak spots. And I had resanded the top of this one so the finish doesn't match well.
You get the idea..
Here's a much better burn on a piece of plywood. I have a lot of practice ahead to get proficient at this..
(https://imageshack.com/i/poIb0LmZj)

I am more interested in the branding iron.  I'm finally starting to actually build some simple furniture and would like that ID marking.  Where did you get yours?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: fencerider on November 11, 2017, 02:15:59 AM
wow just talked to a coworker about this subject

here is a good place to start Cavebear

https://brandingirons.com/collections/wood


Allpurpose your just in time for legal marijuana in California.🤔 I was checking out being a grower a couple days after that ballot passed last year but I dont have a yard to grow a crop😕
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on November 11, 2017, 05:31:23 AM
wow just talked to a coworker about this subject

here is a good place to start Cavebear

https://brandingirons.com/collections/wood


Allpurpose your just in time for legal marijuana in California.🤔 I was checking out being a grower a couple days after that ballot passed last year but I dont have a yard to grow a crop😕

Thank you.  I want my name and a bear shape.  I'll contact the sites.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: fencerider on November 11, 2017, 01:08:24 PM
If you want to do it by hand you can pick up a wood burning/ engraving tool at a hobby store for $30-$40. I don’t know if there are other websites. My coworker wants to make little things to sell at the swap-meet, but he didnt say what design he wanted.


My last post I was talking about wood dye (Keta wood dye et.al.) Since then I discovered Cactus Juice Wood Stabilizing Resin. (mostly clear with a yellow tint) It can be colored with alumilite dye or left plain. They work it by putting the piece of wood in a large container of cactus juice inside a vacume chamber. Then cook it to make it set.

Has anyone tried using a vacume chamber to get linseed oil or tung oil into a piece of wood?
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on November 11, 2017, 01:21:39 PM
If you want to do it by hand you can pick up a wood burning/ engraving tool at a hobby store for $30-$40. I don’t know if there are other websites. My coworker wants to make little things to sell at the swap-meet, but he didnt say what design he wanted.


My last post I was talking about wood dye (Keta wood dye et.al.) Since then I discovered Cactus Juice Wood Stabilizing Resin. (mostly clear with a yellow tint) It can be colored with alumilite dye or left plain. They work it by putting the piece of wood in a large container of cactus juice inside a vacume chamber. Then cook it to make it set.

Has anyone tried using a vacume chamber to get linseed oil or tung oil into a piece of wood?

Thank you.

And I wondered where the yellow went...
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on November 13, 2017, 05:31:57 PM
I am more interested in the branding iron.  I'm finally starting to actually build some simple furniture and would like that ID marking.  Where did you get yours?
A guy in Czech Republic,  https://www.etsy.com/listing/463111385/custom-logo-branding-iron-with-custom
Very helpful with questions and the brand itself is made of much thicker material than most which holds heat much longer than thin brass brands. The shipping costs are kind of pricey, but the product is top notch.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on November 13, 2017, 05:37:31 PM
I am more interested in the branding iron.  I'm finally starting to actually build some simple furniture and would like that ID marking.  Where did you get yours?
One problem selling furniture is a lot of people are hesitant because so much stuff on sites such as craigslist, etc has bedbugs on or in it and its tough to sell furniture plus it's expensive to ship.
I thought about selling furniture, but man, you either have to just about give it away or the quality has to be so well made with extreme workmanship that you have to price it so high that nobody can afford it..
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on November 15, 2017, 02:25:54 AM
One problem selling furniture is a lot of people are hesitant because so much stuff on sites such as craigslist, etc has bedbugs on or in it and its tough to sell furniture plus it's expensive to ship.
I thought about selling furniture, but man, you either have to just about give it away or the quality has to be so well made with extreme workmanship that you have to price it so high that nobody can afford it..

No. I mean only building furniture for myself.  Starting with a real workbench.  I'm still using a cheap workbench that doubles as an extension to the old radial saw.  I am intending to build one of those rollable island workbenches like in the woodworking mags, then  some end tables, and finally a dining table.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: fencerider on November 16, 2017, 02:04:33 AM
One problem selling furniture is a lot of people are hesitant because so much stuff on sites such as craigslist, etc has bedbugs on or in it and its tough to sell furniture plus it's expensive to ship.
I thought about selling furniture, but man, you either have to just about give it away or the quality has to be so well made with extreme workmanship that you have to price it so high that nobody can afford it..
I worked long enough for a contractor to get my own licence for finsh carpentry, but I also thought about going the Amazon route. A quick look at Amazon will show that whatever price range you’re looking at has a niche there. (you can name your price because there will always be vendors much higher price than you. Problem is that a quick look at Amazon will also show thousands of products in the price range that you want to work at
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Cavebear on November 18, 2017, 03:39:17 AM
I worked long enough for a contractor to get my own licence for finsh carpentry, but I also thought about going the Amazon route. A quick look at Amazon will show that whatever price range you’re looking at has a niche there. (you can name your price because there will always be vendors much higher price than you. Problem is that a quick look at Amazon will also show thousands of products in the price range that you want to work at

I doubt you can make any money on Amazon.  They whole premise is eliminating profits of manufacturers i their favor.

Fortunately, I just want to build a set of personal floating wood top furniture with a few arts and crafts techniques.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: Baruch on November 18, 2017, 09:58:50 AM
I doubt you can make any money on Amazon.  They whole premise is eliminating profits of manufacturers i their favor.

Fortunately, I just want to build a set of personal floating wood top furniture with a few arts and crafts techniques.

My Ex was doing used books, back in 2002.  By that time she was already losing money .... too many other people doing the same thing, and the source of used books (thrift shops) had gotten wise, no longer put the good stuff out.  Now that is Adam Smith capitalism.  For every action, eventually there is an opposite reaction ... but only if you keep government monopoly or manipulation out of the market.  There are few natural monopolies, except the government creates them for their favored campaign contributors.
Title: Re: Woodworking
Post by: AllPurposeAtheist on November 19, 2017, 12:18:28 AM
Just testing out the google photo sharing app..
(https://photos.app.goo.gl/36uvOWLd7b4pLQW22)

Nope..doesn't do didly squoot.. Never mind..