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Humanities Section => Political/Government General Discussion => Topic started by: Mike Cl on February 05, 2021, 03:48:07 PM

Title: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 05, 2021, 03:48:07 PM
Trump and conspiracy theories go hand-in-hand.  Is this new?  Has it happened before--yeah, we knew it did, but for how long and what?  Was curious, so I spent a tiny amount of time on the net to do a little research.  Some of what I found.

I generally like what Christopher Hitchens says and this is what he said about conspiracy theories:  Christopher Hitchens described conspiracy theories as the "exhaust fumes of democracy": the unavoidable result of a large amount of information circulating among a large number of people. Conspiracy theories may be emotionally satisfying, by assigning blame to a group to which the theorist does not belong and so absolving the theorist of moral or political responsibility in society.

This is a wiki that has dozens and dozens of them:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_conspiracy_theories

Some I was not aware of:
--Conspiracy theories frequently emerge following the deaths of prominent leaders and public figures. In ancient times, widespread conspiracy theories were circulated pertaining to the death of the Roman emperor Nero, who committed suicide in 68 AD.[22] Some of these theories claimed that Nero had actually faked his death and was secretly still alive, but in hiding, plotting to return and reestablish his reign.[22] In most of these stories, he was said to have fled to the East, where he was still loved and admired.[22] Other theories held that Nero really was dead, but that he would return from the dead to retake his throne.[22] Many early Christians believed in these conspiracy theories and feared Nero's return because Nero had viciously persecuted them.[22] The Book of Revelation alludes to the conspiracy theories surrounding Nero's alleged return in its description of the slaughtered head returned to life.[22]

--Some theorists believe that Denver International Airport stands above an underground city which serves as a headquarters of the New World Order. Theorists cite the airport's unusually large size, its distance from Denver city center, Masonic and alleged Satanic symbols, as well as a set of murals which include depictions of war and death.[65]

--Conspiracy theories exist alleging that Israel uses animals to conduct espionage or to attack people. These are often associated with conspiracy theories about Zionism. Matters of interest to theorists include a series of shark attacks in Egypt in 2010, Hezbollah's accusations of the use of "spying" eagles,[79] and the 2011 capture of a griffon vulture carrying an Israeli-labeled satellite tracking device.[80]

--There are dozens more and the full article is a fun read.

Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 05, 2021, 04:17:12 PM
When these billions of dollars of lawsuits are done popularizing conspiracy theories is going to be in the same box with NAMBLA.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Cassia on February 05, 2021, 04:39:43 PM
My favorite recent example....

During a November 19 press conference, Trump legal team attorney Sidney Powell alleged without evidence that an international Communist plot had been engineered by Venezuela, Cuba, China, Hugo Chávez (who died in 2013), George Soros, and the Clinton Foundation, to rig the 2020 election. She also alleged that Dominion Voting Systems "can set and run an algorithm that probably ran all over the country to take a certain percentage of votes from President Trump and flip them to President Biden.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 05, 2021, 06:19:45 PM
Conspiracy theories were with us from the start:

Here’s an interesting snippet from the archives: Letters from George Washington discussing the Illuminati in 1798. Washington was responding to a parcel containing a book, Proofs of a Conspiracy against All the Religions and Governments of Europe (1797), written by John Robinson, a renowned Scottish Professor. The book accused European Freemasonry of being infiltrated by the Order of the Illuminati, who aimed to “root out all the religious establishments and overturn all the existing governments of Europe.”

Source of letters: https://archive.vn/bTWyY
[Washington to Reverend Snyder]:

“I have heard much of the nefarious, & dangerous plan, & doctrines of the Illuminati […] I believe notwithstandings, that none of the Lodges in this Country are contaminated with the principles ascribed to the Society of the Illuminati.”
[Washington responding to Reverend Snyder’ reply]:

“It was not my intention to doubt that, the Doctrines of the Illuminati, and principles of Jacobinism had not spread in the United States. On the contrary, no one is more fully satisfied of this fact than I am. The idea I meant to convey, was, that I did not believe that the Lodges of Free Masons in this Country had, as Societies, endeavoured to propagate the diabolical tenets of the first, or the pernicious principles of the latter (if they are susceptible of seperation). That Individuals of them may have done it, and that the founder, or instrument employed to found, the Democratic Societies in the United States, may have had these objects […] is too evident to be questioned.”
So, Washington believed that Illuminism was an evil threat, decried the Jacobins (French Revolutionaries), and called them both diabolical and pernicious. Apparently, he didn’t believe that Masonic lodges in America had fallen to Illuminism, but he did suspect that Illuminati-affiliated individuals were no doubt attempting to subvert the country, even though the Illuminati was outlawed almost a decade earlier. So, obviously he believed that Illuminati conspirators continued their schemes underground, or via other organizations, such as European Freemasonry.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 05, 2021, 08:18:15 PM
Lou Dobbs was removed from the FOX News programming lineup today, after Dobbs and two others were sued for spreading conspiracy theories harmful to their business.  I first noticed Dobbs over 20 years ago, and I thought he was predisposed to controversy that was not well founded.  He seemed like he had the lowdown on all kinds of horrible things Americans were not aware of.  He was never entirely clear where his information came from.  I thought he was kind of interesting at first, but later decided he was probably a lunatic, or at least was a vital part of the lunatic fringe.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/05/business/lou-dobbs-fox.html?campaign_id=60&emc=edit_na_20210205&instance_id=0&nl=breaking-news&ref=cta&regi_id=129705843&segment_id=51116&user_id=33a2a6e6868fd65c48b0f219d16ed7c2
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Hydra009 on February 05, 2021, 10:25:47 PM
I generally like what Christopher Hitchens says and this is what he said about conspiracy theories:  Christopher Hitchens described conspiracy theories as the "exhaust fumes of democracy": the unavoidable result of a large amount of information circulating among a large number of people. Conspiracy theories may be emotionally satisfying, by assigning blame to a group to which the theorist does not belong and so absolving the theorist of moral or political responsibility in society.
They're also emotionally gratifying because the theorist can feel like they "have everything figured out" (ambiguity intolerance (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambiguity_tolerance%E2%80%93intolerance), which is linked to right-wing authoritarian personality and low openness to experience) and privy to secret knowledge that sets them intellectually above the general public (an elevated status that no doubt appeals to people who aren't very intelligent).

Scapegoating is also tempting when the truth is admission of widespread failure and lack of control (like 9/11 conspiracies and JFK conspiracies)
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: GSOgymrat on February 06, 2021, 01:11:41 AM
Here is a video exploring the nature, formation, and possible personality characteristics associated with conspiracy theories. I agree that the underlying emotion behind conspiracy theories is anxiety. As Dr. Grande points out, conspiracy theories don't have a happy component to them. The alien lizard humaniods are never merely here on vacation or here to help us. Conspiracy theories are associated with people who have political cynicism, low self-esteem, low intelligence, and a low sense of being in control.

https://youtu.be/-TdY1Bt0fpw
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 06, 2021, 08:21:14 AM
I hope we can benefit from the open discourse on conspiracy advocacy. (I use that term in lieu of "conspiracy theorist" because the latter gives too much dignity to those lunatics.)
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Cassia on February 06, 2021, 09:41:22 AM
Seth Andrews just tweeted this...LOL
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EtZxZOgXIAAZSE6?format=jpg&name=medium)
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 07, 2021, 03:45:12 AM
Fifteen years ago or so in my travels, I came across a guy who was convinced 9-11 was the work of the US government.  He was a theorist, and he had produced a set of dvds of him explaining why and how the government did it.  I was amiable to him, so he gave me his disks, which I did watch.  He had an interesting story to tell, but no proof of anything.  His tactic was to introduce one part of the conspiracy, and then announce, "As you will see, I will offer undeniable proof that this is true,"  but he never actually introduced proof of any kind.  What he could be remembered for was claiming he had proof, or that there was proof that was known by a large segment of "people in the know."  He did this over and over again, and I wondered if he thought he had actually produced proof, or if just liked saying he had proof.

Hey, the man says there's proof!  What more do you need to know?

In the above video, the Doctor points out that conspiracy theories are not delusions in the psychiatric sense, and the people holding them are still what we call normal.  Well OK, I'm not going to argue the point, but this shit sure seems delusional to me.  I guess when a delusion is widely held, it's not a real delusion, but those guys that attacked the Capitol, seemed nuts enough to me to qualify as full blown crazies.  What's dangerous about this is that society is willing to accept this as normal.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 07, 2021, 03:53:54 AM
I hope we can benefit from the open discourse on conspiracy advocacy. (I use that term in lieu of "conspiracy theorist" because the latter gives too much dignity to those lunatics.)
There does seem to be a rather open discourse on the subject going on, not just here, but the media in general.  How much it will help, I'm not sure.  But one thing I am grateful for is that at least people are talking about the phenomenon, as opposed to just presenting the conspiracies as "News."  This discussion seems far more important than some asshole spinning rumors for the general public.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: GSOgymrat on February 07, 2021, 06:02:56 AM
    
In the above video, the Doctor points out that conspiracy theories are not delusions in the psychiatric sense, and the people holding them are still what we call normal.  Well OK, I'm not going to argue the point, but this shit sure seems delusional to me.  I guess when a delusion is widely held, it's not a real delusion, but those guys that attacked the Capitol, seemed nuts enough to me to qualify as full blown crazies.  What's dangerous about this is that society is willing to accept this as normal.

Delusions are fixed, false, usually unshared beliefs, focused primarily on the believer. By definition, delusions are always false beliefs. In contrast, conspiracy theories are usually, but not necessarily, false. They are typically shared beliefs that don't explicitly or directly involve the believer, and are based on evidence that one finds from outside sources, such as on the internet. Conspiracy theories are highly communal in nature with networks of like-minded individuals reinforcing one another's beliefs in a particular socio-cultural context.

Examples of delusions include a woman who has a persistent belief she is pregnant despite all evidence to the contrary or a homeless man who believes he has his own record company and owns the songs he hears on the radio.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: viocjit on February 07, 2021, 07:02:27 AM
Who is a former conspiracy theorist there ? I'm a former believer in these things.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 07, 2021, 08:01:22 AM
   
Delusions are fixed, false, usually unshared beliefs, focused primarily on the believer. By definition, delusions are always false beliefs. In contrast, conspiracy theories are usually, but not necessarily, false. They are typically shared beliefs that don't explicitly or directly involve the believer, and are based on evidence that one finds from outside sources, such as on the internet. Conspiracy theories are highly communal in nature with networks of like-minded individuals reinforcing one another's beliefs in a particular socio-cultural context.

Examples of delusions include a woman who has a persistent belief she is pregnant despite all evidence to the contrary or a homeless man who believes he has his own record company and owns the songs he hears on the radio.
Yes, I understand that conspiracy theories are like believing in Gods, and most psychologists, don't classify conspiracy theories or religions as delusions, just as Christianity is not considered a cult by most sociologists.  It is an arbitrary line that divides such behaviors from our generalized perspectives of their relative counterparts.  To me it seems like reverse apologetics in an attempt to avoid classifying most of humanity as nuts:  "Here's the definition of delusion.  Here's the definition of a cult.  Now lets tinker with them so that we can make exceptions for special groups."

I think it's a matter our perception of the glass being half full or half empty and varies with our personal perceptions of humanity.  If you see humanity as mostly normal, the glass may be half full.  If you see half of humanity as abnormal, the glass will be half empty.  But humanity, including the individuals that make it up, are a little bit of both.  The glass is full but very cloudy, and all lines separating the mixture are arbitrary.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 07, 2021, 08:48:05 AM
There does seem to be a rather open discourse on the subject going on, not just here, but the media in general.  How much it will help, I'm not sure.  But one thing I am grateful for is that at least people are talking about the phenomenon, as opposed to just presenting the conspiracies as "News."  This discussion seems far more important than some asshole spinning rumors for the general public.
And I'm hopeful we will benefit from this discourse. And from the billion+ dollar la suit against Fux News et al.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 07, 2021, 09:11:35 AM
And I'm hopeful we will benefit from this discourse. And from the billion+ dollar la suit against Fux News et al.
I read an article yesterday that said the business community is doing more to control the spread of conspiracy theory than the media.  I think it was phrased as "doing for truth what the media could not."  But a lot of the Trumpsters will see it as voting machine companies just bringing fraudulent law suits to cover up their fraudulent business practices by paying off fraudulent judges.  But it could start a small drift toward reason, and may have a slight chilling effect on politicians that spread false information.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 07, 2021, 09:30:11 AM
https://mail.yahoo.com/b/folders/1/messages/ANPGK9BQ65plYB_SJQkrqEWRLUE?.src=ym&reason=unsupported_browser&folderType=INBOX&showImages=true&offset=0

Quote
The use of defamation suits has also raised questions about how to police a news media that counts on First Amendment protections. But one liberal lawyer said, “It’s gotten to the point where the problem is so bad right now there’s virtually no other way to do it.”
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 07, 2021, 09:55:05 AM
Who is a former conspiracy theorist there ? I'm a former believer in these things.
That is interesting.  I like to think that I have not developed or believed in any conspiracy theory.  But I've always been skeptical of most things, until I've had a chance to figure something out for myself.  But I have a close friend who believes JFK was killed because LBJ wanted him dead.  We have talked about this at some length (I have tried not to attack him but tried to figure out what he thinks is proof) and he still persists that LBJ had it done. 

So, you believed in a conspiracy(s) theory.  What caused you to not believe it anymore?
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Cassia on February 07, 2021, 10:18:03 AM
Got a good laugh when I logged onto FB. It has been weeks. An acquaintance of mine who has never read a book in her adult life is now quoting Ayn Rand, LOL. She is screaming for to us to "wake up" to her new found truths. Apparently without the benefit of any post high school education, international travel or personal involvement in economics beyond shopping, she has become the go-to Yoda on macro economics and political science.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 07, 2021, 01:02:22 PM
Ayn Rand? Well, I guess you've got to start being gullible some place, so why not start with Ayn Rand?  You can move on to the Moonies from there, and then to Alex Jones.  Sounds like a whole new world has opened up for your Facebook friend.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Hydra009 on February 07, 2021, 03:53:44 PM
She is screaming for to us to "wake up" to her new found truths.
Imho, that's the mating call of "too far gone" people.  It's basically all over at that point.

Quote
Apparently without the benefit of any post high school education, international travel or personal involvement in economics beyond shopping, she has become the go-to Yoda on macro economics and political science.
LOL.  While I do think lay opinions on that kind of thing are perfectly valid and important in a democracy, also it's very important to be able to cite authorities on the subject rather than just pretending to know-it-all.

I advocate for transitioning to green energy all the time, but I gotta tell you guys, if you handed me the power to do so, I wouldn't have the foggiest idea how to begin and would probably melt from the pressure.  One wrong move and we're talking about serious human consequences.  But I can at least point to countries that have had success in this area and experts who do know what they're doing and could take us further down that path if given the chance.  So it's a fairly grounded idea, not a pie-in-the-sky wish.  Without these sorts of sanity checks, politics would be madness incarnate.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: GSOgymrat on February 07, 2021, 04:37:49 PM
Got a good laugh when I logged onto FB. It has been weeks. An acquaintance of mine who has never read a book in her adult life is now quoting Ayn Rand, LOL. She is screaming for to us to "wake up" to her new found truths. Apparently without the benefit of any post high school education, international travel or personal involvement in economics beyond shopping, she has become the go-to Yoda on macro economics and political science.

People read Atlas Shrugged and always believe they are the John Galts of the world and not the parasites. Looking forward to that stimulus check, Deborah?
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 07, 2021, 06:25:59 PM
Imho, that's the mating call of "too far gone" people. It's basically all over at that point. ...

  :rotflmao:  The series of scenes popping in front of my eyes... oh my...
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 08, 2021, 08:19:56 AM
I read an article yesterday that said the business community is doing more to control the spread of conspiracy theory than the media.  I think it was phrased as "doing for truth what the media could not."  But a lot of the Trumpsters will see it as voting machine companies just bringing fraudulent law suits to cover up their fraudulent business practices by paying off fraudulent judges.  But it could start a small drift toward reason, and may have a slight chilling effect on politicians that spread false information.
Deplatforming is important. If Facebook says "We're not going to allow that" the conspiracy freaks have one less audience. The Loud Boys will whinge about "my right to Freedom of Speech" without ever looking at what that amendment says.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 08, 2021, 09:13:00 AM
I lost a post due to momentary black out....Ooof

E: Power was off for e few min,lol.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 08, 2021, 09:20:41 AM
Boss Lady sometimes says "Ctrl-Alt-Del" when I say something incomprehensible.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Cassia on February 15, 2021, 04:50:24 PM
The next big date for QAnon followers is March 4 when they claim Trump will be inaugurated as the 14th president.... because the U.S. was "incorporated" in 1871 and all amendments passed after that are invalid.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Hydra009 on February 15, 2021, 05:30:41 PM
The next big date for QAnon followers is March 4 when they claim Trump will be inaugurated as the 14th president.... because the U.S. was "incorporated" in 1871 and all amendments passed after that are invalid.
Surprised that they implicitly include the 13th amendment.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 15, 2021, 07:12:26 PM
A fun date to mark on our calendars.  Maybe they can get Mike Pence this time.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 15, 2021, 07:15:53 PM
The Millerites:

The Millerites were members of a ​religious sect who became famous in 19th century America for fervently believing the world was about to end. The name came from William Miller, an Adventist preacher from New York State who gained an enormous following for asserting, in fiery sermons, that Christ’s return was imminent.


At hundreds of tent meetings around America throughout the summers of the early 1840s, Miller and others convinced as many as one million Americans that Christ would be resurrected between the spring of 1843 and the spring of 1844. People came up with precise dates and prepared to meet their end.


As the various dates passed and the end of the world did not occur, the movement began to be ridiculed in the press. In fact, the name Millerite was originally bestowed upon the sect by detractors before coming into common usage in newspaper reports.

The date of October 22, 1844, was eventually chosen as the day when Christ would return and the faithful would ascend to heaven. There were reports of Millerites selling or giving away their worldly possessions, and even donning white robes to ascend to heaven.

The world did not end, of course. And while some followers of Miller gave up on him, he went on to play a role in the founding of the Seventh Day Adventist Church.

Just like the Millerites, the Q people will not go away--break apart and form new organizations.  Apparently stupid can't be killed.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Hydra009 on February 15, 2021, 10:55:11 PM
The crazy thing about the Millerites is that they didn't die out, they just rebranded.

The Shakers (which pretty much entirely died out, celibacy tends to do that), Seventh Day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, the Davidians and their offshoot the Branch Davidians, and various other minor (I wanna use the word cult) sects.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 16, 2021, 09:04:43 AM
The crazy thing about the Millerites is that they didn't die out, they just rebranded.

The Shakers (which pretty much entirely died out, celibacy tends to do that), Seventh Day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, the Davidians and their offshoot the Branch Davidians, and various other minor (I wanna use the word cult) sects.
Yes, I find that amazing.  But I shouldn't.  I don't think the tale of the Millerites is unique.  Or even all that rare. In the Millerites instance, they not only did not die out, but eventually became bigger and stronger.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Hydra009 on February 16, 2021, 12:20:24 PM
Eh, I dunno about bigger.  Seventh Day Adventists = ~21.4 million and Jehovah's Witnesses = ~8.5 million, out of upwards of 900 million protestants.  Not insignificant, but dwarfed by other groups.  I'm not sure how many Millerites existed originally, though.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 16, 2021, 12:56:20 PM
Some of my lunatic cousins took the GED yesterday, forty in all. About twenty left without finishing the test and the rest failed it. (Who says there's no prayer in the classroom?) They were all homeschooled. The parents are going to sue Biden for not providing the necessary tools for success. Seems this part of the plot to get kids back where they can be endoctrinated in the liberal lifestyle.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 16, 2021, 01:02:37 PM
Eh, I dunno about bigger.  Seventh Day Adventists = ~21.4 million and Jehovah's Witnesses = ~8.5 million, out of upwards of 900 million protestants.  Not insignificant, but dwarfed by other groups.  I'm not sure how many Millerites existed originally, though.
Enough to cause quite a ripple effect thru the ages.

'False Prophet William Miller and The Seventh Day Adventists went on to spawn, in 1955, the Davidian Day Adventists, many of whose members perished in the fiery inferno that ended the infamous Waco Seige of 1993. (see David Koresh)

Other groups that would evolve from The Great Disappointment, either directly or indirectly, include The Christadelphians (circa 60,000) , The Church of God Seventh-Day (circa 200,000), The Church of God General Conference (circa 300,000) Church of the Blessed Hope (circa 800) The Seventh Day Adventists Reform Movement (circa 35,000) Davidian Seventh Day Adventists (unknown) United Seventh Day Adventist (unknown) primitive Advent Church (circa 500) and The Sabbath Rest Advent Church (circa 250).

Finally, Charles Taze Russell admitted that a presentation by Millerite preacher Jonas Wendell in 1870 (outlining Wendell’s own belief that Christ’s Second Coming would happen between 1873 & 1874) was the direct catalyst for the formation of his Bible Student Movement the same year. That group, which later included Millerite writers George Stetson and George Stoors, eventually led to the formation of the Jehovah’s Witnesses in 1931 (approx eight-million)'
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 16, 2021, 01:12:54 PM
Some of my lunatic cousins took the GED yesterday, forty in all. About twenty left without finishing the test and the rest failed it. (Who says there's no prayer in the classroom?) They were all homeschooled. The parents are going to sue Biden for not providing the necessary tools for success. Seems this part of the plot to get kids back where they can be endoctrinated in the liberal lifestyle.
Assuming you are not exaggerating, I wouldn't have thought the GED was that hard, or that a large segment of the population couldn't pass it.  But I never took it, so I don't really know.  The way you have talked about your cousins in the past, I'm wondering why they wanted to take it at all.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: GSOgymrat on February 16, 2021, 01:13:37 PM
The parents are going to sue Biden for not providing the necessary tools for success.

I don't understand.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 17, 2021, 07:15:30 AM
I don't understand.
Neither do they. But they hope to get some money without working, so they take a shot. The judge called their last class action suit in one word, "Frivolous".
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 17, 2021, 07:19:33 AM
Assuming you are not exaggerating, I wouldn't have thought the GED was that hard, or that a large segment of the population couldn't pass it.  But I never took it, so I don't really know.  The way you have talked about your cousins in the past, I'm wondering why they wanted to take it at all.
The "home schooling" the kids get is 99% from the Bible, the only book most of them have at home. Some of the kids learned to read by watching subtitles on TV. As for the GED, the parents had them take "so we can show ya'll intellectuals that kids can be educated at home." I know kids who did very well being home schooled, but the parent really has to participate in the education for it to work. With my cousins this is seldom the case. And most of the kids want an GED so they can get into the Army.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 17, 2021, 08:24:14 AM
OK, that makes sense. 
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Cassia on February 17, 2021, 08:30:19 AM
I think of what Noam Chomsky says about public schools, that they are all about solidarity. In the 50's and 60's there was so much care put into public education. In the 90's I started hearing coworkers bitching big-time about taxes for schools. How fucking short-sighted can you get?
We moved around a lot when I was a kid. We headed from New England down South for my 5th grade. They were relatively at a 3rd grade reading and math level. I immediately got bored and often disciplined for yacking and ended up in a Catholic school, even worse..the uselessness of reciting fucking rosary beads for hours of torture. Their idea of PE was playing 4-square out in the church parking lot. I checked out a medical book about tropical diseases to gross the other kids out with the pictures. I think they thought I was devil-spawn.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 17, 2021, 09:20:46 AM
Education is a lower priority today.  I've thought about this too.  Both parties want to be the education party, but really they care most about their image, not the actual priority.  I remember Regan cutting education budgets, while claiming he could provide better education for less money.  Of course, that was a wonderful thing, but of course, it was nonsense.  It was brilliant politics that appeals to public fantasy, but it was mostly nonsense.  Everyone wants everything for less, for nothing if possible.  Education is very expensive.  I cannot imagine how to make it less expensive without making it less.

Also, as much as I think it's a good thing, I'm not sure how necessary it is today.  You can educate brilliant minds, but if you have nothing for them to do when they are ready to work, what have you accomplished?  And what good are smarter adults to either political party where the funding starts?  And then there is public perception that is not all in agreement about public school priorities.  Should it be football for their boys or more challenging classes?  Should it be easier grades or more challenge?  Not everyone has the same priorities, so there is no public movement toward a specific goal.

Back to Regan, I remember his education czar, I think it was William Bennett, making the case that teachers could be paid half salaries, because so many teachers were married to other teachers, giving them a double salary that they didn't need.

The bottom line is that I'm not sure Americans overall value education that much.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 17, 2021, 09:28:50 AM
Regan was the one who started this slide into what the country has become--1% land with room for nobody else.  A tiny example or two.  He shut down a large number of mental facilities and the patients then became homeless on CA streets.  And he passed a law that allows teachers to only get 50% of their social security--he labeled it double-dipping.  While he double-dipped himself with his actors guild pension, gov. of CA pension and so on.  Even though I managed to get my 40 quarters in, I receive only 50% of what I should. 
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 17, 2021, 09:35:14 AM
About putting mental patients out on the streets, I remember Regan saying, it was really what the patients wanted.  Yet the man was one of our more popular presidents.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Cassia on February 17, 2021, 10:11:04 AM
I wonder if the MGTOW thing is akin to conspiracies? A lot of them are way right of center. Have a nephew who went through that, but seems like he is over it now. They are a funny bunch. Saying stuff about women like this makes me chuckle, maybe because there is truth in it.

Woman, age 20: "Don't talk to me."
Woman, age 30: "He's talking to me!"
Woman, age 40: "Please talk to me!"
Woman, age 45: "Hey, I'm talking to you!"
Woman, age 50: "Here kitty, kitty, kitty!"
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Cassia on February 17, 2021, 10:23:26 AM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EucBNXqWYAIGtre?format=jpg&name=large)
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 17, 2021, 10:27:37 AM
What is she doing or what does she think she is doing? I don't know what's the corret question.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Cassia on February 17, 2021, 12:03:49 PM
What is she doing or what does she think she is doing? I don't know what's the corret question.
That's a Qanon conspiracy believing, US congresswoman Greene grabbing a feel of her jesus.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 17, 2021, 12:46:52 PM
I wonder if the MGTOW thing is akin to conspiracies? A lot of them are way right of center. Have a nephew who went through that, but seems like he is over it now. They are a funny bunch. Saying stuff about women like this makes me chuckle, maybe because there is truth in it.
I had to look that up, I'm so far behind on acronyms and texting short cuts, that I can hardly understand a thing anyone says anymore.  I think it's the iPhone culture, and it will undoubtedly play an important part in the apocalypse.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: GSOgymrat on February 17, 2021, 04:23:25 PM
I wonder if the MGTOW thing is akin to conspiracies? A lot of them are way right of center. Have a nephew who went through that, but seems like he is over it now. They are a funny bunch. Saying stuff about women like this makes me chuckle, maybe because there is truth in it.

I think MGTOW is akin to conspiracy theory thinking and the online MGTOW things I have seen appear to have a cultish flavor. There are people who become fixated on a particular way of viewing the world. With MGTOW everything is about gender roles and perceived inequities of men related to women. I remember in graduate school one of my classmates was the victim of childhood sexual abuse and in almost every roleplay he would view the situation in terms of abuse, even on completely unrelated topics. People can get stuck in ways of thinking-- when you only have a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 18, 2021, 06:23:57 AM
I think MGTOW is akin to conspiracy theory thinking and the online MGTOW things I have seen appear to have a cultish flavor. There are people who become fixated on a particular way of viewing the world. With MGTOW everything is about gender roles and perceived inequities of men related to women. I remember in graduate school one of my classmates was the victim of childhood sexual abuse and in almost every roleplay he would view the situation in terms of abuse, even on completely unrelated topics. People can get stuck in ways of thinking-- when you only have a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

You hit it on the nail. They hate that saying by the way and keep projecting it. You were working in a field related psychology, right? I can't be sure. I think you should read manosphere in general and red pill self help culture. Because it is nowhere near explicit and exclusive as your example. I think it could be useful for you. It's very widely and deeply spread. The worst part is, I believe the damage is irreversible.

Before getting fixated to see the world in a particular way -be it gender or something else- with all these movements, these young men have one thing in common. It is overexposing the life they uspposedly desire to live via social media. So they are exactly doing the same thing with the young women of their age -who they supposedly 'hate' so much and define as the main reason. (and of course women can't go their own way. :lol: It doesn't count.)

Anyway, it's nothing but attention skeeing behaviour of a childlike individual. Largely, they are kids. That and ripping out alienated males of any age online for the mature ones. If it wasn't so sad, it would be even funny. When this has first become a thing, most of the guys who worked these young men in youtube were traditionally married with children kind of types. It's probably a whole new level now.

If you decide to go your own way, you go your own way and live your life. If you want to advertise it, if you can't stop talking and showing your life, if this becomes your existance in any medium, you are not going anywhere. You are just making money by inflicting emoitonal disstres in others. That's why I keep saying it is like heavy narc. When they start somewhere and get in to this, they keep searching for a bigger dose all the time. That's actually why they can't go their own way or any way.

It reminds me a bit of the men who build cabins in woods, go hunting and then make videos of hours and hours with themes like 'my journey to self-sufficiency'...Writing, narrating some stuff about 'their trials against nature' and 'a man's value', 'fighting against the new age...'  That's your journey to become some internet persona which is the center of new age civilisation. Obviously, I'm not talking about normal people who loves living outdoors. This is a specific, cringe worthy thing. When I first saw it I'd even liked it... then you register what's actually going on.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 18, 2021, 06:31:41 AM
Read recently that QAnon is distraught over Biden using Air Force One. They seem to think that T.rump has the right to use it "until the election is settled", that being the magic date of March 4th. (Subject to change, of course.)
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 18, 2021, 06:40:48 AM
Like batman and batmobile or ironman and his suit? I can't decide.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 18, 2021, 07:03:26 AM
@Gawdzilla Sama Is there anything good on claims of experiments on American soliders during the Vietnam War? Anything beyond conspiracy theories.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 18, 2021, 07:41:30 AM
@Gawdzilla Sama Is there anything good on claims of experiments on American soliders during the Vietnam War? Anything beyond conspiracy theories.
The military is continuously experimenting, and getting volunteers for those experiments. One that comes to mind is extreme cold weather gear. Volunteers entered a chamber and the temperature was dropped to -40 (F and C at that point.) The guys wearing the new gear lasted longer than the ones in the current cold weather outfits.

Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 18, 2021, 08:07:59 AM
The military is continuously experimenting, and getting volunteers for those experiments. One that comes to mind is extreme cold weather gear. Volunteers entered a chamber and the temperature was dropped to -40 (F and C at that point.) The guys wearing the new gear lasted longer than the ones in the current cold weather outfits.

Oh yeah I see. What about that famous 'lsd' stuff, I mean heavy chemicals of that sort has any solid thing to do it?
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Cassia on February 18, 2021, 08:50:37 AM
I heard that Q christians have been able to harvest "likes" from atheist forums and are able to convert them into the socks that go missing in the dryer. It takes 100 "likes" to print out a sock, so I will stop hitting the like button until I get notice from admins that we have defeated the enemy.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 18, 2021, 09:12:56 AM
Oh yeah I see. What about that famous 'lsd' stuff, I mean heavy chemicals of that sort has any solid thing to do it?
Shoe, when I was in the Army on active duty in the late '60's and early 70's, I ended up as a Special Agent for Military Intelligence (yeah, yeah, I know....).  Anyway, I was on an interview team that interviewed LSD experimenters; each person who had taken it for the Army was interviewed every 5 years to monitor their reaction to the drug.  So, the US Army did experiment with the drug.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 18, 2021, 09:15:16 AM
Shoe, when I was in the Army on active duty in the late '60's and early 70's, I ended up as a Special Agent for Military Intelligence (yeah, yeah, I know....).  Anyway, I was on an interview team that interviewed LSD experimenters; each person who had taken it for the Army was interviewed every 5 years to monitor their reaction to the drug.  So, the US Army did experiment with the drug.

OK. Thanks.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 18, 2021, 09:17:01 AM
I heard that Q christians have been able to harvest "likes" from atheist forums and are able to convert them into the socks that go missing in the dryer. It takes 100 "likes" to print out a sock, so I will stop hitting the like button until I get notice from admins that we have defeated the enemy.

Hide the regular posters of the funny pic thread!
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 18, 2021, 09:23:54 AM
Trump Will Start the End of the World, Claim Evangelicals Who Support Him

https://www.newsweek.com/trump-will-bring-about-end-worldevangelicals-end-times-779643

Evangelical Christians overwhelmingly support President Donald Trump because they believe he'll cause the world to end.

Many have questioned why devout evangelicals support Trump, a man who has bragged about sexual assault, lies perpetually and once admitted he never asks God for forgiveness. Trump's lack of knowledge of the Bible is also well-known.

Nevertheless, many evangelical Christians believe that Trump was chosen by God to usher in a new era, a part of history called the "end times." Beliefs about this time period differ, but it is broadly considered the end of the world, the time when Jesus returns to Earth and judges all people.


Christian prophets continually show up over time.  It is a never ending stream of prophecy.  And it is very, very consistent--not once, has any prophecy ever come to pass.  Yet, the brain dead (or brainless) eat this shit up.  So, March 4th marks the time Trump will enter the presidency once again and will lead the world into the end times.  The sheeple will continue to be sheared.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 18, 2021, 09:53:00 AM
I'm not up on the apocalypse, but I seem to recall that the anti-christ plays an important role.  Doesn't he fool the righteous or something like that?  But then "ta-dah," the real Christ returns and sets things straight with a final reckoning.   I think the anti-Christ comes first.  If that's true, why to the righteous gravitate to the first obviously "Not Christ" that shows up.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Cassia on February 18, 2021, 09:59:09 AM
Trump Will Start the End of the World, Claim Evangelicals Who Support Him

https://www.newsweek.com/trump-will-bring-about-end-worldevangelicals-end-times-779643

Evangelical Christians overwhelmingly support President Donald Trump because they believe he'll cause the world to end.

Many have questioned why devout evangelicals support Trump, a man who has bragged about sexual assault, lies perpetually and once admitted he never asks God for forgiveness. Trump's lack of knowledge of the Bible is also well-known.

Nevertheless, many evangelical Christians believe that Trump was chosen by God to usher in a new era, a part of history called the "end times." Beliefs about this time period differ, but it is broadly considered the end of the world, the time when Jesus returns to Earth and judges all people.


Christian prophets continually show up over time.  It is a never ending stream of prophecy.  And it is very, very consistent--not once, has any prophecy ever come to pass.  Yet, the brain dead (or brainless) eat this shit up.  So, March 4th marks the time Trump will enter the presidency once again and will lead the world into the end times.  The sheeple will continue to be sheared.
Welp, there it is. The longing for the end so the ungrateful fools can go on.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 18, 2021, 10:21:22 AM
Oh yeah I see. What about that famous 'lsd' stuff, I mean heavy chemicals of that sort has any solid thing to do it?
That has been confirmed to be an CIA experiment program.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: SGOS on February 18, 2021, 10:52:34 AM
I don't know if Agent Orange was an experiment or just disregard for soldiers, and I'm not sure if they have yet to resolve the harm it may have caused.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 18, 2021, 11:34:15 AM
Oh, I am just trying to think of ideas for a short story. That's why I keep asking about horrible stuff, lol.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 18, 2021, 01:06:12 PM
I don't know if Agent Orange was an experiment or just disregard for soldiers, and I'm not sure if they have yet to resolve the harm it may have caused.
Agent Orange was a defoliant. Removed the jungle cover so the supply lines could be spotted and interdicted.

My brother dropped Agent Orange on me. We had to have a talk about that.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 18, 2021, 01:07:52 PM
Oh, I am just trying to think of ideas for a short story. That's why I keep asking about horrible stuff, lol.
Agent discusses with old Vietnam vet about volunteering for a special project, a time machine. The agent asks him who he would shoot if he went back to 1963, just  before JFK got shot? And why?
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 18, 2021, 01:16:35 PM
Agent discusses with old Vietnam vet about volunteering for a special project, a time machine. The agent asks him who he would shoot if he went back to 1963, just  before JFK got shot? And why?

LOL Nothing like that. It is just collecting topics of real events in history to put in a basket as it were. It's not to be used in a complete sense.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 18, 2021, 01:58:48 PM
I saved the punchline. Every time the vet is interviewed it is the first time for him. But he's been the shoot/bomber/etc. in a long string of executions.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 18, 2021, 02:28:30 PM
Agent discusses with old Vietnam vet about volunteering for a special project, a time machine. The agent asks him who he would shoot if he went back to 1963, just  before JFK got shot? And why?
I would say trump. :) And Cruz and the turtle, and....................well, you get the idea.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 19, 2021, 02:34:41 PM
I think Zilla has meant Oswald.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Gawdzilla Sama on February 19, 2021, 04:15:36 PM
I think Zilla has meant Oswald.
I was twelve at the time.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: GSOgymrat on February 23, 2021, 12:04:43 PM
People will believe literally anything.

TikTok Users Are Burning Snowballs in Viral Videos to 'Prove' the Snow is Fake (https://gizmodo.com/tiktok-users-are-burning-snowballs-in-viral-videos-to-p-1846322841)

Have you seen those viral videos on TikTok and Twitter where users are burning snow to “prove” that it’s actually fake? Needless to say, the snow is real. The viral videos actually show a perfectly normal reaction to placing the flame of a lighter or match against a snowball. But that hasn’t stopped these videos from racking up millions of views.

Who’s creating this “fake” snow that’s falling from the sky all around the world, according to the conspiracy theorists? Bill Gates, of course, the evil puppetmaster behind so many of the world’s ills right now—from the covid-19 pandemic to secret tracking chips inside all of the world’s coronavirus vaccines.

Yes, conspiracy theorists with smartphones are really worried about being constantly tracked through their... vaccines. And it’s not just Bill Gates. Some people believe China is in on the whole conspiracy, sending fake snow to the U.S. in an effort to convince Americans climate change is real. China may have even done this to make Ted Cruz look bad, according to some conspiracy theorists. ...

Why is this conspiracy theory gaining traction again? It seems to be two factors: First, Texas was hit with an absolutely devastating winter storm that brought snow to areas that almost never see snow. A lot of people in Texas are seeing snow for the first time in their lives and that naturally leads to a lot of questions.

Secondly, there’s the fact that Bill Gates has actually floated the idea of using weather control to battle climate change. The idea is to spray calcium carbonate into the atmosphere so that it can reflect some of the sun’s rays back and hopefully cool down the Earth, as Forbes explains. ...
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Mike Cl on February 23, 2021, 12:23:09 PM
Just another reason to think out country is simply too stupid to live.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Blackleaf on February 23, 2021, 03:54:44 PM
Secondly, there’s the fact that Bill Gates has actually floated the idea of using weather control to battle climate change. The idea is to spray calcium carbonate into the atmosphere so that it can reflect some of the sun’s rays back and hopefully cool down the Earth, as Forbes explains. ...

I heard about that. It delays global warming, but it also turns the atmosphere into a ticking timebomb, if we don't take action to actually reduce carbon emissions. Rather than see the effects gradually over many years, it would hit us all at once like an apocalypse.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Hydra009 on February 23, 2021, 04:21:30 PM
Snow is apparently a lot cheaper to make than ski resorts let on.  Also, you have to wonder at what anyone could gain by an unusually large snowstorm.  Aside from the power companies charging Texans ludicrous bills, not a whole lot of people are benefiting.

This seems like yet another example of a systemic failure covered up by conspiracy theory.  Can't find someone to blame, so blame Canada Bill Gates.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: viocjit on February 27, 2021, 01:24:33 AM
That is interesting.  I like to think that I have not developed or believed in any conspiracy theory.  But I've always been skeptical of most things, until I've had a chance to figure something out for myself.  But I have a close friend who believes JFK was killed because LBJ wanted him dead.  We have talked about this at some length (I have tried not to attack him but tried to figure out what he thinks is proof) and he still persists that LBJ had it done. 

So, you believed in a conspiracy(s) theory.  What caused you to not believe it anymore?

I did analyzed what say the debunkers and I did concluded what say debunkers is more sensical that what say conspiracy theories.
When I deconvert from Christianity to became an Atheist I understood than my beliefs about my destiny were false

1.Between my 4 years old until my deconversion at age of 19 or 20 I always had the feeling that I will take part to the last battle (Armageddon not the film but the place).

2.Between my 4 years old until my deconversion at age of 19 or 20 I had often this weird sensation in my Thorax , a sensation to be like a empty memory card that was a physical sensation of my faith.

3.Between my 4 years old until my deconversion at age of 19 or 20 I always had the feeling that I will have the chance to see the second coming of Christ.

4.Conspiracy theories make me believe I was on the good side and reinforced my belief in religion.

5.When I began to deconvert from Christianity. I began to understand my beliefs in conspiracy theories weren't true.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: aitm on February 27, 2021, 08:09:21 AM
My wife’s aunt sent her a notice straight from Quacker-non...this one was from mid Jan. They claimed there were some 375,000 Chinese troops “surrounding us...75,000 in Canada and the rest in Mexico....but DONT WORRY Trumps general are ready to wipe them out...

Keepers, you’d think some folks in Canada would notice 75,000 chinks....

Supposedly the space force has been in existence for years only under a old name. Now it is up and running and they have already shot down a dozen Chinese missies off the coast of Florida...but DONT WORRY...Trumps general are all over it...you won’t even hear about it.

LOL...jesus fucking christ...these followers are some really really stupid people...and THAT makes them dangerous.
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on February 27, 2021, 11:18:53 AM
Snowfake videos! AHAHAAH I'm sure sombody thought of that before. 

E: posted to the wrong thread before...
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: GSOgymrat on March 18, 2021, 10:34:09 AM
Interesting article on conspiracy theories and the strategy of engaging people's doubts rather than challenging their beliefs.

What Conspiracy Theorists Don’t Believe - Distinguishing excessive doubt from excessive belief can help inform how to bring a conspiracy theorist back to reality. (https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/03/the-conspiracy-theorists-problem-isnt-what-they-believe/618285/?utm_source=feed)

... Is the line between excessive doubt and excessive belief a distinction without a difference? I don’t think so, because it helps inform how to bring a conspiracy theorist back to reality. One must recognize that this is a person who already mistrusts what most authoritative sources say. One should ask calm questions, inviting the conspiracy theorist to explain and reflect on his beliefs, rather than advance evidence or quote the experts. The evidence and the experts, remember, are exactly what the conspiracy theorist has already rejected.

When someone has dismissed the obvious facts, repeating them will not persuade him to see sense. But when people are given time and space to explain themselves, they may start to spot the gaps in their own knowledge or arguments. The psychologists Leonid Rozenblit and Frank Keil coined the phrase “the illusion of explanatory depth” to refer to the way our self-assurance crumples when we are invited to explain apparently simple ideas.

A focus on excessive credulity distracts from the problem of excessive doubt, which is everywhere in our modern information ecosystem. We are all capable of motivated reasoning, of believing what we want to believe. But we are all also capable of doubting what we want to doubt, and studies have found that motivated reasoning has a special power when it takes the form of doubt. ...

Propagandists have long understood this quirk of human psychology. In the 1950s, when Big Tobacco faced growing evidence that cigarettes were deadly, the industry turned doubt into a weapon. Realizing that smokers dearly wished to believe that their habit wasn’t killing them, Big Tobacco concluded that the best approach was not to try to prove that cigarettes were safe. Instead, it would merely raise doubts about the emerging evidence that they were dangerous. The famous “Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers” from 1954 managed to look socially responsible while simultaneously reassuring smokers that “research scientists have publicly questioned” the significance of the new findings. ...

Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: drunkenshoe on March 18, 2021, 11:22:03 AM
OK. But these people do not make researches or readings about what experts say on some subject and decide according to that. They are opinions and ideas are not really built. They only listen what few people in their circle says, whoever in the most powerful position and repeat that to each other and others to have a standing, to be accepted in that group. Religious, nationalist groups are closed groups with strong hierarchies by thier nature and definition. They are not tolerant, diverse groups.

If you join one of these groups and ask them to explain their beliefs, nobody would try to explain something but hand you some source telling what it is the truth and that it is the truth. Chances are high that you won't have conversations and probably won't last long if you insist and at some point, you'll be told to leave. You would even be in danger of some sort. 

If you join some tolerant, diverse, democratic group in general and try to argue about conspiracy theories, people would argue back with different ways, styles, sources, books and at most laugh at you some point, if you insist on it.

Also, I've missed this one somehow: "...airplane GPS is rigged to fool pilots into thinking otherwise. ..." LOL
Title: Re: Conspiracy theories
Post by: Hydra009 on March 18, 2021, 03:00:20 PM
Quckoos find special significance in the White House having a green light on St. Patrick's Day (https://www.newsweek.com/qanon-white-house-green-light-1577144)

Two possibilities:
1) celebrating St. Patrick's Day (pretty straightforward and obvious)
2) a secret signal to a band of nutjobs to *do something* cause green street lights mean go